CollectionsWater Quality
IN THE NEWS

Water Quality

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 8, 1987 | By Vanessa Herron, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Downingtown Borough Council has taken steps to deal with chronic problems with water-quality and parking on Manor Avenue. During its work session Wednesday, the council took preliminary action to ban parking on the busy street and voted to add a chemical to the borough's water that will cut down on a rusty sediment that is especially prevalent in Manor Avenue homes. The vote on water quality came after months of complaints from residents of Manor Avenue that their water often was a rusty brown.
NEWS
June 28, 2012 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
SEA BRIGHT, N.J. - New Jersey had the fourth-best beach water quality in the nation last year, a new report from the Natural Resources Defense Council says. The environmental group's annual water quality report found that Tropical Storm Irene took a toll on beachgoers last summer, forcing beaches to be closed or warnings issued at a rate nearly double that of the previous year because of pollution concerns. The report, using government data, found that in New York and New Jersey, there were 1,972 days when beaches were closed or advisories issued to the public, compared with 1,065 in 2010.
NEWS
April 2, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The William Penn Foundation is announcing Tuesday a massive effort to turn the Delaware River watershed into a lab for innovation - for investigating and determining how best to protect or restore water quality. About $35 million in grants mainly over the next three years - with the potential of nearly $200 million more to follow in leveraged money - will fund the work that will protect more than 30,000 acres, implement more than 40 restoration projects, find solutions that can be replicated elsewhere, and follow through with years of data collection to quantify the effects.
NEWS
July 17, 2012 | Daily News Editorial
LAST WEEK, DUKE University released a study on water quality in the Marcellus Shale region. Many Pennsylvanians concerned about the state's new industry of gas drilling will be interested in the findings of this study. Here's a sampling of headlines from the media coverage: Marcellus Shale study claims gas drilling did not contaminate drinking-water wells; New research shows no Marcellus Shale pollution; Pennsylvania fracking can put water at risk, Duke study finds; Yet another study confirms fracking can pollute groundwater; New study: Fluids from Marcellus Shale likely seeping into Pa. drinking water; Findings are mixed in fracking-water study.
NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Delaware River Basin Commission has named a longtime water company official with connections on both sides of the river as its next executive director. Steven J. Tambini, 54, a civil and environmental engineer who lives in Medford, will take over the position on Aug. 1, the commission announced Monday. He will make $120,000 a year. He replaces Carol R. Collier, who is retiring after 15 years with the commission. Tambini has worked in water supply engineering and water resource planning and management for three decades.
NEWS
March 19, 1995 | By David Kinney, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A year after setting up a small laboratory to study the water quality in streams, lakes and ponds here, the township has a verdict: The water is fine. The township's environmental commission, with the help of a $5,000 grant from the Delaware Estuary Program, planted 13 testing stations in half a dozen tiny tributaries such as Mantua Creek, Big Timber Creek and Stevens Run last year. Then it took two readings at each site and analyzed them for levels of dissolved oxygen, iron, sulfate, ammonia and other substances.
NEWS
December 26, 1993 | By Josh Zimmer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It may go down as the Great Gloucester City Water Crisis of 1993. In late June, a sudden outbreak of bacterial growth in the water supply, which manifested itself through foggy water and the rotten-egg smell of hydrogen sulfide, turned one of life's simple pleasures - taking a shower - into a nauseating experience. "You smelled . . . because the water had an odor to it," Mayor Walter W. Jost remembered. "There was nothing the matter with drinking it, if you could get it past your nose.
NEWS
July 16, 1999 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The ocean water quality off the Jersey Shore has been "tremendous" this summer after a season that saw the fewest beach closings in at least a decade, local officials and environmental groups said yesterday. "I believe our ocean and beaches in Atlantic City and throughout New Jersey are cleaner now than at any time that I remember," Atlantic City Mayor James Whelan, a former lifeguard, said at a news conference at the Beach Patrol Headquarters at South Carolina Avenue. Atlantic City has not had a beach closing because of ocean water quality since 1995, officials said.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The angler remains unknown to officials. But in a photo one of his buddies took before the fish was released back into the Schuylkill, the species was unmistakable. The catch last summer just below the Fairmount Dam was a shortnose sturgeon, on the endangered list since 1967. Although they are known to live in the Delaware River, no historic records indicate shortnose sturgeon in the Schuylkill. And in 14 years of fish sampling below the dam, aquatic biologists with the Philadelphia Water Department have never seen one. Yet there it was, held up by the angler, with the dam and the Art Museum in the background.
NEWS
August 15, 1991 | Daily News Wire Services
No other state acts more forcefully than New Jersey to protect swimmers from polluted beach waters, according to a study of 10 coastal states released yesterday. "Only New Jersey mandates that beaches close if tests indicate that the bacterial concentration standard has been exceeded," the Natural Resources Defense Council said. More than 228 New Jersey beaches, mainly in the north, were closed last year due to high concentrations of human and animal fecal bacteria in the water, the group said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The angler remains unknown to officials. But in a photo one of his buddies took before the fish was released back into the Schuylkill, the species was unmistakable. The catch last summer just below the Fairmount Dam was a shortnose sturgeon, on the endangered list since 1967. Although they are known to live in the Delaware River, no historic records indicate shortnose sturgeon in the Schuylkill. And in 14 years of fish sampling below the dam, aquatic biologists with the Philadelphia Water Department have never seen one. Yet there it was, held up by the angler, with the dam and the Art Museum in the background.
NEWS
October 14, 2014
ISSUE | DUI CASE Justice for officer Thanks to Inquirer staff writer Barbara Boyer for highlighting Carrie Berner's fight for answers in the death of her husband, Moorestown Police Officer Craig Berner ("Moorestown officer's widow seeks answers in fatal crash," Oct. 6). There are two issues plaguing our sense of right and wrong here: Drivers who continue to drive under the influence despite being caught over and over again, and police officers receiving a slap on the wrist for a crime that would send others (rightly so)
NEWS
August 19, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Days since last rainfall?" "Well, yesterday we got a little bit. " "Water clarity?" "Looks pretty clear to me. " "All righty. Stream bed color?" "Brown," Doug McClure pauses, staring at the mud, "with green highlights. " "Odor?" Wendy McClure doesn't wait for her husband's answer. She spreads her arms wide and raises her nose to the sky: "Doesn't smell like much of anything. Just a creek. " The North Wales couple were on their first official field survey Wednesday as "Creek Watchers" - a group of 60 amateur scientists collecting water-quality data for the Wissahickon Valley Watershed Association.
NEWS
May 1, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
LAWRENCEVILLE, N.J. After a hiatus of more than three years that had upset environmentalists, the state's advisory panel for drinking water standards reconvened Tuesday and immediately began considering regulations for a contaminant that has disconcerted several South Jersey towns. The Drinking Water Quality Institute's meeting was its first since September 2010. Half of the panel is new, either appointed or ex-officio since then. The institute was created in 1983 to make regulatory recommendations to the state Department of Environmental Protection.
NEWS
April 2, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The William Penn Foundation is announcing Tuesday a massive effort to turn the Delaware River watershed into a lab for innovation - for investigating and determining how best to protect or restore water quality. About $35 million in grants mainly over the next three years - with the potential of nearly $200 million more to follow in leveraged money - will fund the work that will protect more than 30,000 acres, implement more than 40 restoration projects, find solutions that can be replicated elsewhere, and follow through with years of data collection to quantify the effects.
NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Delaware River Basin Commission has named a longtime water company official with connections on both sides of the river as its next executive director. Steven J. Tambini, 54, a civil and environmental engineer who lives in Medford, will take over the position on Aug. 1, the commission announced Monday. He will make $120,000 a year. He replaces Carol R. Collier, who is retiring after 15 years with the commission. Tambini has worked in water supply engineering and water resource planning and management for three decades.
NEWS
August 24, 2013 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
OCEAN CITY, N.J. - The beach on Thursday was covered in visitors who would likely go home, flush the toilet, take a shower, dry off with a laundered towel, and maybe have a nice glass of . . . something. Probably none of them considered exactly where the water that would allow them to do all of those things - including making an iced tea - came from. Except, perhaps, for those beachgoers at the Seventh Street beach who stopped to look at a quirky sand sculpture by the artist John Gruber, commissioned by New Jersey American Water.
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
When beachgoers take to the water at the New Jersey Shore and elsewhere, they may expect to come away with a nasty sunburn if they are not careful. But the Natural Resources Defense Council, in its 23d annual good-news-bad-news report on the nation's beaches released Wednesday, contends that beach lovers may be in for more than they bargained for these days in the form of dysentery, hepatitis, stomach flu, and rashes. Such cases are "extremely underreported," according to Jon Devine, a senior attorney for the NRDC, who spoke at a teleconference Wednesday from Washington.
NEWS
April 18, 2013 | By Tom Johnson, NJ SPOTLIGHT
New Jersey expects to buy out 1,000 properties damaged by Hurricane Sandy, with the focus on purchasing entire streets or neighborhoods, according to the state Department of Environmental Protection. With $250 million in federal money allocated for the effort, DEP Commissioner Bob Martin faced repeated questions Monday from the Senate Budget and Appropriations Committee during a hearing on the agency's proposed budget for fiscal year 2014. "What we're trying to do is buy out whole streets and whole neighborhoods.
NEWS
April 13, 2013
Another shellfish bed damaged by Hurricane Sandy has reopened in New Jersey's Barnegat Bay. The state's Department of Environmental Protection reopened beds in the Little Egg Harbor section at sunrise Friday. DEP is planning to open all of the beds in the Raritan Bay on Monday. The plans are part of an administrative order signed by DEP Commissioner Bob Martin in November that reopened beds from Little Egg Inlet south to Cape May Point. The beds had been closed since Oct. 29 because of concerns over water quality caused by Sandy.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|