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Water Quality

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NEWS
November 8, 1987 | By Vanessa Herron, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Downingtown Borough Council has taken steps to deal with chronic problems with water-quality and parking on Manor Avenue. During its work session Wednesday, the council took preliminary action to ban parking on the busy street and voted to add a chemical to the borough's water that will cut down on a rusty sediment that is especially prevalent in Manor Avenue homes. The vote on water quality came after months of complaints from residents of Manor Avenue that their water often was a rusty brown.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The angler remains unknown to officials. But in a photo one of his buddies took before the fish was released back into the Schuylkill, the species was unmistakable. The catch last summer just below the Fairmount Dam was a shortnose sturgeon, on the endangered list since 1967. Although they are known to live in the Delaware River, no historic records indicate shortnose sturgeon in the Schuylkill. And in 14 years of fish sampling below the dam, aquatic biologists with the Philadelphia Water Department have never seen one. Yet there it was, held up by the angler, with the dam and the Art Museum in the background.
NEWS
June 28, 2012 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
SEA BRIGHT, N.J. - New Jersey had the fourth-best beach water quality in the nation last year, a new report from the Natural Resources Defense Council says. The environmental group's annual water quality report found that Tropical Storm Irene took a toll on beachgoers last summer, forcing beaches to be closed or warnings issued at a rate nearly double that of the previous year because of pollution concerns. The report, using government data, found that in New York and New Jersey, there were 1,972 days when beaches were closed or advisories issued to the public, compared with 1,065 in 2010.
NEWS
April 2, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The William Penn Foundation is announcing Tuesday a massive effort to turn the Delaware River watershed into a lab for innovation - for investigating and determining how best to protect or restore water quality. About $35 million in grants mainly over the next three years - with the potential of nearly $200 million more to follow in leveraged money - will fund the work that will protect more than 30,000 acres, implement more than 40 restoration projects, find solutions that can be replicated elsewhere, and follow through with years of data collection to quantify the effects.
NEWS
July 17, 2012 | Daily News Editorial
LAST WEEK, DUKE University released a study on water quality in the Marcellus Shale region. Many Pennsylvanians concerned about the state's new industry of gas drilling will be interested in the findings of this study. Here's a sampling of headlines from the media coverage: Marcellus Shale study claims gas drilling did not contaminate drinking-water wells; New research shows no Marcellus Shale pollution; Pennsylvania fracking can put water at risk, Duke study finds; Yet another study confirms fracking can pollute groundwater; New study: Fluids from Marcellus Shale likely seeping into Pa. drinking water; Findings are mixed in fracking-water study.
NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Delaware River Basin Commission has named a longtime water company official with connections on both sides of the river as its next executive director. Steven J. Tambini, 54, a civil and environmental engineer who lives in Medford, will take over the position on Aug. 1, the commission announced Monday. He will make $120,000 a year. He replaces Carol R. Collier, who is retiring after 15 years with the commission. Tambini has worked in water supply engineering and water resource planning and management for three decades.
NEWS
March 19, 1995 | By David Kinney, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A year after setting up a small laboratory to study the water quality in streams, lakes and ponds here, the township has a verdict: The water is fine. The township's environmental commission, with the help of a $5,000 grant from the Delaware Estuary Program, planted 13 testing stations in half a dozen tiny tributaries such as Mantua Creek, Big Timber Creek and Stevens Run last year. Then it took two readings at each site and analyzed them for levels of dissolved oxygen, iron, sulfate, ammonia and other substances.
NEWS
December 26, 1993 | By Josh Zimmer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It may go down as the Great Gloucester City Water Crisis of 1993. In late June, a sudden outbreak of bacterial growth in the water supply, which manifested itself through foggy water and the rotten-egg smell of hydrogen sulfide, turned one of life's simple pleasures - taking a shower - into a nauseating experience. "You smelled . . . because the water had an odor to it," Mayor Walter W. Jost remembered. "There was nothing the matter with drinking it, if you could get it past your nose.
NEWS
July 16, 1999 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The ocean water quality off the Jersey Shore has been "tremendous" this summer after a season that saw the fewest beach closings in at least a decade, local officials and environmental groups said yesterday. "I believe our ocean and beaches in Atlantic City and throughout New Jersey are cleaner now than at any time that I remember," Atlantic City Mayor James Whelan, a former lifeguard, said at a news conference at the Beach Patrol Headquarters at South Carolina Avenue. Atlantic City has not had a beach closing because of ocean water quality since 1995, officials said.
NEWS
August 17, 2016 | By Mensah M. Dean, Staff Writer
HYDRATION STATIONS have arrived in the School District of Philadelphia. The stations - water fountains equipped with filters and separate faucets from which to fill water bottles - will be up and running at 43 schools when classes start next month, school officials announced Monday. Each school is receiving at least three hydration stations, and plans call for the remainder of the district's more than 170 schools to receive stations by the end of the school year, spokesman Kevin Geary said.
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NEWS
August 17, 2016 | By Mensah M. Dean, Staff Writer
Hydration stations have arrived in the School District of Philadelphia. The stations - water fountains equipped with filters and separate faucets from which to fill water bottles - will be up and running at 43 schools when classes start next month, school officials announced Monday. Each school is receiving at least three hydration stations, and plans call for the remainder of the district's more than 170 schools to receive stations by the end of the school year, spokesman Kevin Geary said.
NEWS
August 1, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
The city of Camden on Saturday afternoon lifted its water-boil advisory following a water main break Thursday that affected more than half of the city's residents. The city and American Water, which operates most of Camden's system, said repairs have been completed and testing shows the water quality to be safe. Before using water straight from faucets, the city urged residents to first run faucets for three to five minutes to flush out pipes, to empty and clean automatic ice makers, and to drain and refill hot water heaters if the temperature is set below 113 degrees Fahrenheit, among other precautions.
NEWS
July 25, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
From the greener suburbs of Montgomery County to urbanized Manayunk, the Wissahickon Creek courses through some of the region's most-scenic areas and alongside a well-traveled trail. It is a popular fishing, and even a swimming, stream. It is also a troubled stream; a source of concern, particularly since it supplies 10 percent of Philadelphia's drinking water. The Environmental Protection Agency has identified the Wissahickon's water quality as "impaired," and efforts to improve it have been more than a decade in the making.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
The water crisis in Flint, Mich., where residents unknowingly drank water with harmful levels of lead, has brought new scrutiny to public water-supply systems. How does Philadelphia's water rate? Officials will address that question at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University on Tuesday evening. Debra McCarty, the new commissioner of the Philadelphia Water Department, will be joined by Lynn Thorp, national campaigns director for Clean Water Action, and Jerry Fagliano, chair of the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health at Drexel University's Dornsife School of Public Health.
NEWS
April 16, 2016
By Joseph M. Manko In recent weeks, the issue of safe drinking water has been unusually conspicuous, thanks to headlines emanating from Flint, Mich., and elsewhere. Philadelphians have good reason to be proud of their city's robust tradition of watershed protection and commitment to providing safe, top-quality drinking water. That commitment was first made 200 years ago, when the city's government, business, and community leaders decided on an innovative plan to create a public waterworks system that would guarantee safe drinking water for the citizens of Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 10, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
New water tests at a Lower Merion school showed a cafeteria faucet suspected of having elevated lead levels now registers at an acceptable rate - but also found possible contaminants in a drinking fountain and a water line. The result of the drinking fountain test at Penn Wynne Elementary were at the Environmental Protection Agency's "action level," while the basement water line was near the action level, according to school officials. In a letter to parents Thursday informing them of the test results, principal Shawn Bernatowicz said action-level readings are not necessarily a public-health concern, according to the EPA, but could require more testing and monitoring at the 600-student school.
NEWS
April 9, 2016
New Jersey legislators are trying to correct an oversight in the state's environmental laws, which do not require schools to regularly test their water for lead. Unacceptable levels of lead have been found in the water at 30 of Newark's 67 public schools, which have shut down their water fountains. The discovery raises questions about water quality in schools around the state. A bill sponsored by Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester) and Sens. Ron Rice and Teresa Ruiz (both D., Essex)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2016 | By Sienna Vance, Staff Writer
At Camden's Adventure Aquarium, visitors can swim with sharks and touch sharks. And now they will be able to walk above them. Shark Bridge will allow the most daring visitors to walk the 81-foot-long, V-shaped rope suspension bridge across the aquarium's 21-foot-deep Shark Realm, a 550,000-gallon exhibit housing the aquarium's massive collection of sharks. A "Dare to Cross" sign invites you to stand only inches away from some of the ocean's fiercest predators. Continue walking, as sharks swim beneath your feet.
NEWS
March 10, 2016
New Jersey's Pinelands Commission was once a respected, independent steward of a forest that filters the drinking water for millions in the region. But political manipulation has turned it into an ineffective agency that looks the other way when the preserve's delicate balance is threatened. The latest annual report of the Pinelands Preservation Alliance rightly notes that the forest is facing its greatest threat in decades because the commission simply is not doing its job. The panel's abdication is astounding given national concern over the lead-laden water that is threatening the health of Flint, Mich., residents.
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