CollectionsWater Quality
IN THE NEWS

Water Quality

NEWS
July 19, 1995 | BY KUMAR KISHINCHAND
On the heels of another heat wave, I thought it appropraite to respond to your editorial, "Guess what - its hot" (June 23), and address why the redundancy of our message about the dangers of hydrant misuse does not lessen the importance of the message, nor justify use of hydrants for recreational purposes. Illegally opening fire hydrants drains water that is essential to supplying the needs of residents and businesses, and defeats a hydrant's ability to avert tragedy in firefighting situations.
NEWS
July 8, 1990 | By Karen Weintraub, Special to The Inquirer
The Delaware River has become a much better place to swim in the 30 years since Burlington resident Mike Edwardson took his first dunk. Edwardson, 38, a member of Burlington City's Endeavor Emergency Squad, said the Delaware has better visibility than most of the other waterways in Burlington County. He can now see things six feet away in the Delaware, in contrast to places like Sylvan Lake in Burlington Township, where the visibility is about six inches, Edwardson said. "The river's the best around," he said.
NEWS
January 16, 2002 | By Jonathan Gelb INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Caught on the defensive after the release of a federal report indicating poor water quality in some Chester County streams, county commissioners pledged yesterday to increase efforts to improve stream water. At the weekly commissioners' meeting, county water authority officials gave a sobering overview of stream water health in a county known for its commitment to conservation. In Chester County, 276 of 1,300 total miles - about 21 percent - of streams do not meet state water quality standards, officials said.
NEWS
October 14, 2014
ISSUE | DUI CASE Justice for officer Thanks to Inquirer staff writer Barbara Boyer for highlighting Carrie Berner's fight for answers in the death of her husband, Moorestown Police Officer Craig Berner ("Moorestown officer's widow seeks answers in fatal crash," Oct. 6). There are two issues plaguing our sense of right and wrong here: Drivers who continue to drive under the influence despite being caught over and over again, and police officers receiving a slap on the wrist for a crime that would send others (rightly so)
NEWS
April 13, 2013
Another shellfish bed damaged by Hurricane Sandy has reopened in New Jersey's Barnegat Bay. The state's Department of Environmental Protection reopened beds in the Little Egg Harbor section at sunrise Friday. DEP is planning to open all of the beds in the Raritan Bay on Monday. The plans are part of an administrative order signed by DEP Commissioner Bob Martin in November that reopened beds from Little Egg Inlet south to Cape May Point. The beds had been closed since Oct. 29 because of concerns over water quality caused by Sandy.
NEWS
July 14, 2011 | Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Republican-controlled House passed a bill yesterday that would sharply curtail the federal government's role in protecting waters from pollution by barring the Environmental Protection Agency from overruling state decisions on water quality. The bill passed on a 239-184 vote. Sixteen Democrats joined the majority of Republicans in supporting it. The White House threatened to veto the bill, saying that it "would roll back the key provisions . . . that have been the underpinning of 40 years of progress in making the nation's waters fishable, swimmable and drinkable.
NEWS
June 28, 2011 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
TOMS RIVER - Barnegat Bay is in trouble, and the economy of the region that depends on it could be badly hurt if things don't change, New Jersey's chief environmental official said Monday. Environmental Commissioner Bob Martin noted that the bay is a huge part of New Jersey's $35.5 billion tourism-based economy. He said pollution from lawns and storm sewers is killing it. "The ecological health of Barnegat Bay is in decline, threatening the economic health of the region," he said at a hearing.
NEWS
June 30, 1989 | By Carol D. Leonnig and Mike Schurman, Special to The Inquirer
Health officials yesterday reopened the Ninth Street Beach in Ocean City, 22 hours after closing it because of high concentrations of fecal bacteria in the water. The Cape May County Health Department, working with Ocean City officials and the state Department of Environmental Protection, determined that the contamination came from several leaking sewer lines. The latest tests - taken after some offending pipes were patched - found the count had dropped from 350 to 11 fecal coliform colonies per 100 milliliters of water.
NEWS
July 5, 2011
THIS JUST IN: Rivers often cross state boundaries. In fact, some rivers actually are state boundaries. So if hazardous waste were dumped into the Delaware River in, say, Trenton, some of it would almost certainly find its way to Philadelphia. And we likely would have a problem with that. When it comes to water quality, we're all in this together. That's why the Clean Water Act - which sets and mandates the enforcement of national standards for water quality - has been essential to protecting the environment for nearly four decades.
NEWS
March 30, 1989 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / JOHN COSTELLO
The Friends of Pennypack Park joined the Pennypack Environmental Center March 18 for the center's spring cleanup, and the group has another cleanup - of Pennypack Creek and adjacent trails - scheduled for Saturday, from 10 a.m. to noon. The group encourages residents to bring their gloves, energy and concern for the park to these cleanups, in which the volunteers pick up refuse from the park. Trucks and workers from the Fairmount Park Commission will be on hand Saturday to collect the refuse.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|