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Water Quality

NEWS
July 25, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
From the greener suburbs of Montgomery County to urbanized Manayunk, the Wissahickon Creek courses through some of the region's most-scenic areas and alongside a well-traveled trail. It is a popular fishing, and even a swimming, stream. It is also a troubled stream; a source of concern, particularly since it supplies 10 percent of Philadelphia's drinking water. The Environmental Protection Agency has identified the Wissahickon's water quality as "impaired," and efforts to improve it have been more than a decade in the making.
NEWS
April 16, 2016
By Joseph M. Manko In recent weeks, the issue of safe drinking water has been unusually conspicuous, thanks to headlines emanating from Flint, Mich., and elsewhere. Philadelphians have good reason to be proud of their city's robust tradition of watershed protection and commitment to providing safe, top-quality drinking water. That commitment was first made 200 years ago, when the city's government, business, and community leaders decided on an innovative plan to create a public waterworks system that would guarantee safe drinking water for the citizens of Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 17, 2016 | By Mensah M. Dean, Staff Writer
Hydration stations have arrived in the School District of Philadelphia. The stations - water fountains equipped with filters and separate faucets from which to fill water bottles - will be up and running at 43 schools when classes start next month, school officials announced Monday. Each school is receiving at least three hydration stations, and plans call for the remainder of the district's more than 170 schools to receive stations by the end of the school year, spokesman Kevin Geary said.
NEWS
August 15, 1991 | Daily News Wire Services
No other state acts more forcefully than New Jersey to protect swimmers from polluted beach waters, according to a study of 10 coastal states released yesterday. "Only New Jersey mandates that beaches close if tests indicate that the bacterial concentration standard has been exceeded," the Natural Resources Defense Council said. More than 228 New Jersey beaches, mainly in the north, were closed last year due to high concentrations of human and animal fecal bacteria in the water, the group said.
NEWS
July 19, 1995 | BY KUMAR KISHINCHAND
On the heels of another heat wave, I thought it appropraite to respond to your editorial, "Guess what - its hot" (June 23), and address why the redundancy of our message about the dangers of hydrant misuse does not lessen the importance of the message, nor justify use of hydrants for recreational purposes. Illegally opening fire hydrants drains water that is essential to supplying the needs of residents and businesses, and defeats a hydrant's ability to avert tragedy in firefighting situations.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2016 | By Sienna Vance, Staff Writer
At Camden's Adventure Aquarium, visitors can swim with sharks and touch sharks. And now they will be able to walk above them. Shark Bridge will allow the most daring visitors to walk the 81-foot-long, V-shaped rope suspension bridge across the aquarium's 21-foot-deep Shark Realm, a 550,000-gallon exhibit housing the aquarium's massive collection of sharks. A "Dare to Cross" sign invites you to stand only inches away from some of the ocean's fiercest predators. Continue walking, as sharks swim beneath your feet.
NEWS
July 8, 1990 | By Karen Weintraub, Special to The Inquirer
The Delaware River has become a much better place to swim in the 30 years since Burlington resident Mike Edwardson took his first dunk. Edwardson, 38, a member of Burlington City's Endeavor Emergency Squad, said the Delaware has better visibility than most of the other waterways in Burlington County. He can now see things six feet away in the Delaware, in contrast to places like Sylvan Lake in Burlington Township, where the visibility is about six inches, Edwardson said. "The river's the best around," he said.
NEWS
January 16, 2002 | By Jonathan Gelb INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Caught on the defensive after the release of a federal report indicating poor water quality in some Chester County streams, county commissioners pledged yesterday to increase efforts to improve stream water. At the weekly commissioners' meeting, county water authority officials gave a sobering overview of stream water health in a county known for its commitment to conservation. In Chester County, 276 of 1,300 total miles - about 21 percent - of streams do not meet state water quality standards, officials said.
NEWS
April 13, 2013
Another shellfish bed damaged by Hurricane Sandy has reopened in New Jersey's Barnegat Bay. The state's Department of Environmental Protection reopened beds in the Little Egg Harbor section at sunrise Friday. DEP is planning to open all of the beds in the Raritan Bay on Monday. The plans are part of an administrative order signed by DEP Commissioner Bob Martin in November that reopened beds from Little Egg Inlet south to Cape May Point. The beds had been closed since Oct. 29 because of concerns over water quality caused by Sandy.
NEWS
July 14, 2011 | Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Republican-controlled House passed a bill yesterday that would sharply curtail the federal government's role in protecting waters from pollution by barring the Environmental Protection Agency from overruling state decisions on water quality. The bill passed on a 239-184 vote. Sixteen Democrats joined the majority of Republicans in supporting it. The White House threatened to veto the bill, saying that it "would roll back the key provisions . . . that have been the underpinning of 40 years of progress in making the nation's waters fishable, swimmable and drinkable.
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