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Water Quality

NEWS
March 30, 1989 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / JOHN COSTELLO
The Friends of Pennypack Park joined the Pennypack Environmental Center March 18 for the center's spring cleanup, and the group has another cleanup - of Pennypack Creek and adjacent trails - scheduled for Saturday, from 10 a.m. to noon. The group encourages residents to bring their gloves, energy and concern for the park to these cleanups, in which the volunteers pick up refuse from the park. Trucks and workers from the Fairmount Park Commission will be on hand Saturday to collect the refuse.
NEWS
August 6, 1989 | By Garen Meguerian, Special to The Inquirer
For the second month in a row, the issue of tap water quality dominated a Schuylkill Township Supervisors' meeting Wednesday. Schuylkill resident Joseph Zikmund was among the first to complain about his water, saying: "At least once a week, especially during the heavy rains, I have mud coming out of my faucets. " Zikmund added that the color of his laundry has changed from white to brown. Township chairman Herman A. John suggested changing water companies. "I have been trying to contact the vice president of development for the Philadelphia Suburban Water Co.," John said.
NEWS
January 16, 1987 | By Bob Tulini, Special to The Inquirer
Gloucester County officials decided last night to pay an additional $14,000 for water test results so that the landfill in South Harrison Township can open Feb. 2. Groundwater tests will be conducted early next week, according to Joseph W. Clegg, chairman of the Gloucester County Improvement Authority, which oversees the landfill. The county will pay $65,000 - $14,000 more than originally projected - to get the results before Feb. 2. Officials said that the test results normally would take four to six weeks, but that for the extra cost they could get them back in two weeks.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | By Sydney Trent, Inquirer Staff Writer
The purpose of the mission couldn't have sounded more serious: benthic macroinvertebrate bioassessment. But you wouldn't have guessed it by watching the folks splashing around in the Pennypack Creek Monday evening. "This is our excuse to act like kids," said Judy Toohey, her sneakers drenched as she waded through a foot of water about 10 yards away from the dam near Verree Road. Toohey was one of a dozen members of the Friends of Pennypack Park who showed up for the water-testing session, led by Bob Haines, the group's vice president for environmental affairs, and Pennypack Environmental Center naturalist Peter Kurtz.
NEWS
July 24, 1990 | By EDWARD FLATTAU
Almost everyone is an unabashed environmentalist until conditions require deeds to match rhetoric. Then, economics often transforms those who talk a big game into bench warmers. New Jersey is finding that out the hard way. It's the only state to mandate that beaches be closed if tests demonstrate that "safe" bacteria levels have been exceeded. Other states issue advisories on water quality, but generally leave it up to the discretion of coastal authorities as to whether beaches should be closed.
NEWS
August 24, 2012 | By Kathy Van Mullekom, DAILY PRESS (Newport News, Va.)
Murky storm-water ponds, ugly waste-water lagoons and threatened wetlands may soon find a friend that helps them look and feel better. The tonic appears in the form of small floating islands filled with beneficial plants that help improve water quality, curtail erosion, and benefit wildlife. In southeastern Virginia, these grant-funded islands have been planted and are being studied and evaluated at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia Institute of Marine Science at Gloucester Point, Virginia Zoo in Norfolk and Elizabeth River sites.
NEWS
November 20, 2002 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Sponsors of a bill that would for the first time require major water-using industries to report their rate of consumption said yesterday that they hoped for quick passage before the legislative session ends next week. Although the measure has the blessing of the Schweiker administration and industry groups, potential dams lie ahead. Virtually every environmental group in the state has lined up against the bill, saying it will undermine the state's Clean Streams Law and that loopholes in the measure could allow industries to continue to operate unchecked, threatening water supplies and water quality.
NEWS
June 21, 1999 | By Anne Barnard, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For years, Darby Creek was the neglected stepchild of storm-water management. Delaware County planners gave higher priority to studying Ridley and Chester Creeks, which faced faster development. But now, as a result of two lawsuits and changing views on watershed management, the creek is getting attention from many directions at once. The county is studying storm-water flow, the state is testing aquatic life, Philadelphia officials are monitoring sewage spills, and a community group is conducting a broad survey on conservation of the Darby Creek watershed.
NEWS
August 1, 2000 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When workers poke a hole in a small dam on the Manatawney Creek in Pottstown later his week, the muddy water gushing out will be only the most visible effect. As the pond behind the dam empties, an entire ecosystem will be readjusting itself, from the bacteria and algae to the invertebrates that crawl along the bottom to the fish that swim in it. And all that will not go unnoticed. A team of dozens of researchers from the Patrick Center for Environmental Research, an arm of the Academy of Natural Sciences, will log and quantify everything.
NEWS
November 13, 2005 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As mallards swam on the far edge of the pond and horses grazed in a nearby field, a group of middle school students scrambled down to the pond to test the water quality. Darryl Smack, a student at Drexel Hill Middle School, stuck a thermometer into the water as other students collected samples in test tubes. Huddled together, they soon were evaluating the pond's pH, or level of acidity, and checking the level of nitrates and phosphates, possibly from fertilizers. The outdoor experiments are part of a watershed awareness program offered by the Pennsylvania Resources Council, the state's oldest nonprofit environmental education organization, which makes its home at Ridley Creek State Park in Edgmont.
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