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Water Quality

NEWS
October 1, 1996 | By Anthony Beckman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
They were up to their stomachs in the numbingly cold Brandywine Creek, sifting caddis flies, mayflies and somewhat gruesome hellgrammites, which can grow 3 inches long and have fierce-looking head pincers, segmented wormlike bodies and scads of crawly legs. For 22 Henderson High School seniors, yesterday's daylong canoe trip and scavenger hunt for water critters was included in their grades as part of a new class called FLOWS - standing for "The Future, the Legacy of Our WaterShed.
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | By Carolyn Gretton, Special to The Inquirer
The Newtown Township supervisors have decided to hire accounting and engineering consultants to study whether the township has the money to buy and run its own water company. The decision made during Monday's meeting was the first step in the township's quest to acquire the Indian Rock Water Co., a subsidiary of the Newtown Artesian Water Co. Newtown Artesian has proposed that the two companies be merged. If the merger is approved by the Public Utilities Board, Indian Rock will cease to exist and its customers will be served by Newtown Artesian.
NEWS
January 18, 2012 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
TRENTON - Gov. Christie signed a bill Tuesday that aids land developers in the state by delaying antipollution efforts, a move environmentalists said would mean further deterioration of New Jersey's water quality. At issue are sewer-service designations, or areas of the state approved to someday have sewer service. The sewer boundaries are important because they determine where large-scale development can take place. Under current rules, county governments can protect land from development and reduce dirty storm water and sewage overflow from entering waterways by removing the property from approved sewer-service areas.
NEWS
June 28, 2011 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
TOMS RIVER - Barnegat Bay is in trouble, and the economy of the region that depends on it could be badly hurt if things don't change, New Jersey's chief environmental official said Monday. Environmental Commissioner Bob Martin noted that the bay is a huge part of New Jersey's $35.5 billion tourism-based economy. He said pollution from lawns and storm sewers is killing it. "The ecological health of Barnegat Bay is in decline, threatening the economic health of the region," he said at a hearing.
NEWS
April 9, 2016
New Jersey legislators are trying to correct an oversight in the state's environmental laws, which do not require schools to regularly test their water for lead. Unacceptable levels of lead have been found in the water at 30 of Newark's 67 public schools, which have shut down their water fountains. The discovery raises questions about water quality in schools around the state. A bill sponsored by Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester) and Sens. Ron Rice and Teresa Ruiz (both D., Essex)
NEWS
November 17, 1988
When shoppers in three states surrounding Pennsylvania - Ohio, New York and Maryland - go to the supermarket, the familiar brands of laundry detergent they buy don't contain phosphates, the chemical added as a water "conditioner. " These folks haven't been condemned to a life of dingy whites and dirty collars. Although nonphosphate detergents cost a few cents more, they also are more efficient. More than half the detergents available nationwide contain no phosphates, and the two most popular brands are phosphate-free.
NEWS
September 25, 1986 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources (DER) has tentatively upgraded its designation of Crum Creek in Willistown Township, a move that township officials say will help protect the creek from pollution. Supervisor Rita Reves announced Tuesday night that the DER's Department of Water Quality notified the township Sept. 15 that the stream has qualified for an initial upgrade from a "cold-water fishery" to a "high-quality cold- water fishery. " Edward R. Brezina, chief of the Department of Water Quality, informed the township that the move had received initial approval, but that the DER would accept comments from residents and others for the next 30 days before the legislature votes on the upgrade.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said Friday it would not take any action in response to tests of 16 more drinking-water wells in the embattled natural gas-drilling town of Dimock, Pa., and one resident whose well showed elevated levels of carcinogenic arsenic declined the agency's offer for alternative water. The test results largely reinforced findings the EPA released recently on its tests of 31 other residential water wells in the Susquehanna County township, where opponents and supporters of Marcellus Shale natural gas development have clashed.
NEWS
January 4, 2013 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
Stand by for increased shelling at a Monmouth County, N.J., naval base. State environmental officials are allowing an experimental oyster colony at a Navy pier in Middletown to expand. The goal of researchers from Rutgers University and the New York/New Jersey Baykeeper is to reestablish the once-plentiful shellfish in the Raritan Bay to help improve its water quality. The state Department of Environmental Protection allowed the groups to use nearly 11 acres off the Earle Naval Weapons Station to grow oysters and expand its research reef.
NEWS
September 27, 2011 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAPE MAY - The heavy shipping that produces urban pollution in the Delaware River near Philadelphia usually isn't a problem downstream, at the mouth of the Delaware Bay. But scientists want to know how other activities - including species habitat destruction and overfishing - may be affecting the vast estuary, and how the exchange between the two waterways affects the quality of brackish flow. This summer, a research team from the University of Delaware's College of Earth, Ocean and Environment installed a data-collection device aboard the Twin Capes, one of the vessels of the Cape May-Lewes Ferry, operated by the Delaware River and Bay Authority.
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