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Water Quality

NEWS
March 8, 1990 | By Carolyn Gretton, Special to The Inquirer
The Newtown Township supervisors have decided to hire accounting and engineering consultants to study whether the township has the money to buy and run its own water company. The decision made during Monday's meeting was the first step in the township's quest to acquire the Indian Rock Water Co., a subsidiary of the Newtown Artesian Water Co. Newtown Artesian has proposed that the two companies be merged. If the merger is approved by the Public Utilities Board, Indian Rock will cease to exist and its customers will be served by Newtown Artesian.
NEWS
January 18, 2012 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
TRENTON - Gov. Christie signed a bill Tuesday that aids land developers in the state by delaying antipollution efforts, a move environmentalists said would mean further deterioration of New Jersey's water quality. At issue are sewer-service designations, or areas of the state approved to someday have sewer service. The sewer boundaries are important because they determine where large-scale development can take place. Under current rules, county governments can protect land from development and reduce dirty storm water and sewage overflow from entering waterways by removing the property from approved sewer-service areas.
NEWS
November 17, 1988
When shoppers in three states surrounding Pennsylvania - Ohio, New York and Maryland - go to the supermarket, the familiar brands of laundry detergent they buy don't contain phosphates, the chemical added as a water "conditioner. " These folks haven't been condemned to a life of dingy whites and dirty collars. Although nonphosphate detergents cost a few cents more, they also are more efficient. More than half the detergents available nationwide contain no phosphates, and the two most popular brands are phosphate-free.
NEWS
September 25, 1986 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources (DER) has tentatively upgraded its designation of Crum Creek in Willistown Township, a move that township officials say will help protect the creek from pollution. Supervisor Rita Reves announced Tuesday night that the DER's Department of Water Quality notified the township Sept. 15 that the stream has qualified for an initial upgrade from a "cold-water fishery" to a "high-quality cold- water fishery. " Edward R. Brezina, chief of the Department of Water Quality, informed the township that the move had received initial approval, but that the DER would accept comments from residents and others for the next 30 days before the legislature votes on the upgrade.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said Friday it would not take any action in response to tests of 16 more drinking-water wells in the embattled natural gas-drilling town of Dimock, Pa., and one resident whose well showed elevated levels of carcinogenic arsenic declined the agency's offer for alternative water. The test results largely reinforced findings the EPA released recently on its tests of 31 other residential water wells in the Susquehanna County township, where opponents and supporters of Marcellus Shale natural gas development have clashed.
NEWS
January 4, 2013 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
Stand by for increased shelling at a Monmouth County, N.J., naval base. State environmental officials are allowing an experimental oyster colony at a Navy pier in Middletown to expand. The goal of researchers from Rutgers University and the New York/New Jersey Baykeeper is to reestablish the once-plentiful shellfish in the Raritan Bay to help improve its water quality. The state Department of Environmental Protection allowed the groups to use nearly 11 acres off the Earle Naval Weapons Station to grow oysters and expand its research reef.
NEWS
July 22, 2011 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
When a group of teenagers approached Cobbs Creek this week to test its water quality, they could see something was wrong even before collecting samples: hundreds of dead fish were floating in the slow-moving West Philadelphia waterway. After a short hike upstream and some quick chemical tests, they fingered an apparent culprit Wednesday morning: chlorinated water draining from a municipal swimming pool. The matter was still under investigation Thursday by the state Department of Environmental Protection, whose officials said they did not know for sure who bore responsibility for the mishap.
NEWS
July 24, 1992 | By Thomas Turcol and Monica Yant, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
New Jersey received high grades yesterday for keeping its beaches clean in 1991, according to a federal study of water conditions in 22 coastal states. The Natural Resources Defense Council rated New Jersey near the top among the states for imposing and enforcing strict laws to minimize pollution along its beaches and shoreline. The council reported that in 1991, the state had to close only 108 waterfront areas - just 10 of them along the ocean and the rest on the back bays.
NEWS
August 22, 1993 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Valley Creek is the little stream that could. With the help of its legions of human defenders, the little creek keeps chugging along, notching one bureaucratic victory after another. This past week, the stream's defenders scored a major coup when the state's Environmental Quality Board voted unanimously to place all 23 square miles of the Valley Creek watershed under the state's most protective umbrella. That umbrella is known as "exceptional value status. " It aims to protect streams of the highest water quality from any degradation.
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
When beachgoers take to the water at the New Jersey Shore and elsewhere, they may expect to come away with a nasty sunburn if they are not careful. But the Natural Resources Defense Council, in its 23d annual good-news-bad-news report on the nation's beaches released Wednesday, contends that beach lovers may be in for more than they bargained for these days in the form of dysentery, hepatitis, stomach flu, and rashes. Such cases are "extremely underreported," according to Jon Devine, a senior attorney for the NRDC, who spoke at a teleconference Wednesday from Washington.
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