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Water Quality

NEWS
October 12, 2012 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, Daily News Staff Writer
THAT PLASTIC container you see floating in the Schuylkill? It will probably float away from Philly, but it's hardly gone forever. Along with other junk tossed into local waterways, it ends up in the ocean, where it breaks down into a soupy mush. Remember that next you have a hankering for sushi. Need a visual on this? The 5 Gyres Institute, a California nonprofit, is teaming up with United by Blue, a Philadelphia apparel company that is dedicated to cleaning up waterways around the country, to show people the effects of pollution during a presentation here Monday.
NEWS
August 24, 2012 | By Kathy Van Mullekom, DAILY PRESS (Newport News, Va.)
Murky storm-water ponds, ugly waste-water lagoons and threatened wetlands may soon find a friend that helps them look and feel better. The tonic appears in the form of small floating islands filled with beneficial plants that help improve water quality, curtail erosion, and benefit wildlife. In southeastern Virginia, these grant-funded islands have been planted and are being studied and evaluated at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia Institute of Marine Science at Gloucester Point, Virginia Zoo in Norfolk and Elizabeth River sites.
NEWS
August 5, 2012 | By Kevin Begos, Associated Press
PITTSBURGH - Is natural-gas drilling ruining the air, polluting water, and making people sick? The evidence is inconclusive, but a lack of serious funding is delaying efforts to resolve those questions and creating a vacuum that could lead to a crush of lawsuits, some experts say. A House committee in June turned down an Obama administration request to fund $4.25 million in research on how drilling may affect water quality. In the spring, Pennsylvania stripped $2 million of funding that called for a state health registry to track respiratory problems, skin conditions, stomach ailments, and other illnesses potentially related to gas drilling.
NEWS
August 3, 2012
Is the world falling apart? On Wednesday, one day after 670 million people in India —about 10 percent of the world's population — lost electrical power, residents of North Philly coped with the third water-main break in the city in 10 days. Philadelphians and New Delhians are sharing more than a miserable summer (though, actually, it's the rainy season in India); they are forced to cope with a history of inattention to infrastructure that suggests that there is no end in sight for such disasters.
NEWS
July 17, 2012 | Daily News Editorial
LAST WEEK, DUKE University released a study on water quality in the Marcellus Shale region. Many Pennsylvanians concerned about the state's new industry of gas drilling will be interested in the findings of this study. Here's a sampling of headlines from the media coverage: Marcellus Shale study claims gas drilling did not contaminate drinking-water wells; New research shows no Marcellus Shale pollution; Pennsylvania fracking can put water at risk, Duke study finds; Yet another study confirms fracking can pollute groundwater; New study: Fluids from Marcellus Shale likely seeping into Pa. drinking water; Findings are mixed in fracking-water study.
NEWS
June 28, 2012 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
SEA BRIGHT, N.J. - New Jersey had the fourth-best beach water quality in the nation last year, a new report from the Natural Resources Defense Council says. The environmental group's annual water quality report found that Tropical Storm Irene took a toll on beachgoers last summer, forcing beaches to be closed or warnings issued at a rate nearly double that of the previous year because of pollution concerns. The report, using government data, found that in New York and New Jersey, there were 1,972 days when beaches were closed or advisories issued to the public, compared with 1,065 in 2010.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said Friday it would not take any action in response to tests of 16 more drinking-water wells in the embattled natural gas-drilling town of Dimock, Pa., and one resident whose well showed elevated levels of carcinogenic arsenic declined the agency's offer for alternative water. The test results largely reinforced findings the EPA released recently on its tests of 31 other residential water wells in the Susquehanna County township, where opponents and supporters of Marcellus Shale natural gas development have clashed.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the latest salvo over Marcellus Shale gas drilling in the embattled town of Dimock, a natural gas company on Tuesday alleged that federal regulators had cherry-picked old test data to distort the amount of contamination in drinking-water wells. Cabot Oil & Gas Co., whose drilling was blamed for the pollution, said that the drinking-water tests the Environmental Protection Agency used to justify its Jan. 19 order to deliver fresh water supplies to four Dimock houses "do not accurately represent the water quality" and are inconsistent with the body of data collected at the residences.
NEWS
January 31, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the latest salvo over Marcellus Shale gas drilling in the embattled town of Dimock, a natural-gas company on Tuesday alleged that federal regulators had cherry-picked old test data to distort the amount of contamination in drinking-water wells. Cabot Oil and Gas Co., whose drilling was blamed for the pollution, said that the drinking-water tests the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency used to justify its Jan. 19 order to deliver fresh water supplies to four Dimock residences "do not accurately represent the water quality" and are inconsistent with the body of data collected at the residences.
NEWS
January 18, 2012 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
TRENTON - Gov. Christie signed a bill Tuesday that aids land developers in the state by delaying antipollution efforts, a move environmentalists said would mean further deterioration of New Jersey's water quality. At issue are sewer-service designations, or areas of the state approved to someday have sewer service. The sewer boundaries are important because they determine where large-scale development can take place. Under current rules, county governments can protect land from development and reduce dirty storm water and sewage overflow from entering waterways by removing the property from approved sewer-service areas.
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