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Water Quality

NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Delaware River Basin Commission has named a longtime water company official with connections on both sides of the river as its next executive director. Steven J. Tambini, 54, a civil and environmental engineer who lives in Medford, will take over the position on Aug. 1, the commission announced Monday. He will make $120,000 a year. He replaces Carol R. Collier, who is retiring after 15 years with the commission. Tambini has worked in water supply engineering and water resource planning and management for three decades.
NEWS
August 24, 2013 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
OCEAN CITY, N.J. - The beach on Thursday was covered in visitors who would likely go home, flush the toilet, take a shower, dry off with a laundered towel, and maybe have a nice glass of . . . something. Probably none of them considered exactly where the water that would allow them to do all of those things - including making an iced tea - came from. Except, perhaps, for those beachgoers at the Seventh Street beach who stopped to look at a quirky sand sculpture by the artist John Gruber, commissioned by New Jersey American Water.
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
When beachgoers take to the water at the New Jersey Shore and elsewhere, they may expect to come away with a nasty sunburn if they are not careful. But the Natural Resources Defense Council, in its 23d annual good-news-bad-news report on the nation's beaches released Wednesday, contends that beach lovers may be in for more than they bargained for these days in the form of dysentery, hepatitis, stomach flu, and rashes. Such cases are "extremely underreported," according to Jon Devine, a senior attorney for the NRDC, who spoke at a teleconference Wednesday from Washington.
NEWS
April 18, 2013 | By Tom Johnson, NJ SPOTLIGHT
New Jersey expects to buy out 1,000 properties damaged by Hurricane Sandy, with the focus on purchasing entire streets or neighborhoods, according to the state Department of Environmental Protection. With $250 million in federal money allocated for the effort, DEP Commissioner Bob Martin faced repeated questions Monday from the Senate Budget and Appropriations Committee during a hearing on the agency's proposed budget for fiscal year 2014. "What we're trying to do is buy out whole streets and whole neighborhoods.
NEWS
April 13, 2013
Another shellfish bed damaged by Hurricane Sandy has reopened in New Jersey's Barnegat Bay. The state's Department of Environmental Protection reopened beds in the Little Egg Harbor section at sunrise Friday. DEP is planning to open all of the beds in the Raritan Bay on Monday. The plans are part of an administrative order signed by DEP Commissioner Bob Martin in November that reopened beds from Little Egg Inlet south to Cape May Point. The beds had been closed since Oct. 29 because of concerns over water quality caused by Sandy.
NEWS
February 20, 2013 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thirty years after the New Jersey Legislature created an independent body to determine limits on pollutants in tap water, there is growing concern about its future. The Drinking Water Quality Institute - whose schedule is determined by the state Department of Environmental Protection - has not met in more than two years following a fight over tightening limits on industrial chemicals. And legislation has been introduced that would add representatives of industrial and chemical companies to the board and press the institute to consider industry-funded research in its decision making.
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAPE MAY - When the agenda was planned for the 2013 Delaware Estuary Science and Environmental Summit - a biannual gathering of scientists, academics, and government officials - Sandy hadn't devastated the New Jersey Shore. But the storm that struck Oct. 29 was at the forefront of conversations and some workshop discussions during the four-day conference, titled "Weathering Change - Shifting Environments, Shifting Policies, Shifting Needs. " "So much has happened within the environment since our last summit in 2011, coming in on the heels of what perhaps is the worst natural disaster in the mid-Atlantic in modern times," said Jennifer Adkins, executive director of the Partnership for the Delaware Estuary, which has hosted the event every two years since 2005.
NEWS
January 4, 2013 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
Stand by for increased shelling at a Monmouth County, N.J., naval base. State environmental officials are allowing an experimental oyster colony at a Navy pier in Middletown to expand. The goal of researchers from Rutgers University and the New York/New Jersey Baykeeper is to reestablish the once-plentiful shellfish in the Raritan Bay to help improve its water quality. The state Department of Environmental Protection allowed the groups to use nearly 11 acres off the Earle Naval Weapons Station to grow oysters and expand its research reef.
NEWS
November 1, 2012
VOTERS will find four referendum questions on Tuesday's ballot. Here are the questions and our recommendations for how to vote: *  1. Shall the Philadelphia Home Rule Charter be amended to allow for the establishment of an independent rate-making body for fixing and regulating water and sewer rates and charges ? Vote: No. Reason: Right now, the water commissioner has the power to establish water and sewer rates. While that suggests that the public or elected officials have no say in the processs, that's not entirely true: The City Council president, the mayor, and the controller appoint a hearing officer and a public advocate to review rate requests in a process that takes at least a year.
NEWS
October 25, 2012 | By Jim Kenney
By Jim Kenney With all Philadelphia's waterways officially classified as impaired, we need to use every tool we have to protect our drinking water and clean up our rivers and streams. One such tool is a development buffer around the city's waterways. A buffer of at least 50 feet is important to prevent flooding, filter pollution, and manage storm runoff. Why am I writing about this today? Because it's within City Council's power to protect our waterways with a 50-foot buffer, but some in our ranks may be trying to whittle a proposed buffer down to 25 feet.
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