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Water Quality

BUSINESS
February 1, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the latest salvo over Marcellus Shale gas drilling in the embattled town of Dimock, a natural gas company on Tuesday alleged that federal regulators had cherry-picked old test data to distort the amount of contamination in drinking-water wells. Cabot Oil & Gas Co., whose drilling was blamed for the pollution, said that the drinking-water tests the Environmental Protection Agency used to justify its Jan. 19 order to deliver fresh water supplies to four Dimock houses "do not accurately represent the water quality" and are inconsistent with the body of data collected at the residences.
NEWS
January 31, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the latest salvo over Marcellus Shale gas drilling in the embattled town of Dimock, a natural-gas company on Tuesday alleged that federal regulators had cherry-picked old test data to distort the amount of contamination in drinking-water wells. Cabot Oil and Gas Co., whose drilling was blamed for the pollution, said that the drinking-water tests the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency used to justify its Jan. 19 order to deliver fresh water supplies to four Dimock residences "do not accurately represent the water quality" and are inconsistent with the body of data collected at the residences.
NEWS
January 18, 2012 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
TRENTON - Gov. Christie signed a bill Tuesday that aids land developers in the state by delaying antipollution efforts, a move environmentalists said would mean further deterioration of New Jersey's water quality. At issue are sewer-service designations, or areas of the state approved to someday have sewer service. The sewer boundaries are important because they determine where large-scale development can take place. Under current rules, county governments can protect land from development and reduce dirty storm water and sewage overflow from entering waterways by removing the property from approved sewer-service areas.
NEWS
November 9, 2011 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Long-awaited revisions to the Delaware River Basin Commission's proposed rules that would govern natural-gas development in the watershed were released Tuesday. The highly technical document of 100-plus pages would permit only 300 wells to be drilled until a reassessment is done after 18 months. The rules also call for more water monitoring, more water-use restrictions, and more money to be set aside for remediation. Observers on all sides said the rules were too complicated to assess quickly.
NEWS
October 7, 2011 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
MIDDLETOWN, N.J. - Thursday was shoving-off day for 3,600 baby oysters that were enlisted in a revived science project intended to help clean the polluted waters off a Navy pier. The NY/NJ Baykeeper environmental group transplanted the oysters from its research facility in Highlands to waters surrounding the Earle Naval Weapons Station in Middletown. The pier's heavily guarded perimeter was the key to rescuing the project, which the state Department of Environmental Protection scuttled last year.
NEWS
September 27, 2011 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAPE MAY - The heavy shipping that produces urban pollution in the Delaware River near Philadelphia usually isn't a problem downstream, at the mouth of the Delaware Bay. But scientists want to know how other activities - including species habitat destruction and overfishing - may be affecting the vast estuary, and how the exchange between the two waterways affects the quality of brackish flow. This summer, a research team from the University of Delaware's College of Earth, Ocean and Environment installed a data-collection device aboard the Twin Capes, one of the vessels of the Cape May-Lewes Ferry, operated by the Delaware River and Bay Authority.
NEWS
August 5, 2011 | By Josh Lederman, Associated Press
BARNEGAT, N.J. - Appearing at a site that has become a symbol of pollution and overdevelopment in New Jersey, Gov. Christie cleared the way Thursday for almost $650 million in low-cost and no-cost loans for water-quality and protection projects. The bipartisan legislation Christie signed at Barnegat Bay will make $400 million available for projects that clean up water used for fishing and swimming. An additional $250 million will be available for drinking-water projects. Cities, counties, and utilities across the state have already submitted more than 170 applications.
NEWS
August 5, 2011 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
In another potential roadblock to natural-gas drilling in the upper Delaware River basin, a consortium of environmental groups filed suit in federal court Thursday seeking to delay the adoption of regulations until environmental impacts are studied. The groups contend that the Delaware River Basin Commission, which governs water quality and withdrawals, is subject to federal rules requiring environmental reviews of major projects. The commission "has acknowledged the value of it, and they have simply chosen not to do it," said Maya van Rossum of the Delaware Riverkeeper Network, one of the groups that filed the suit.
NEWS
July 22, 2011 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
When a group of teenagers approached Cobbs Creek this week to test its water quality, they could see something was wrong even before collecting samples: hundreds of dead fish were floating in the slow-moving West Philadelphia waterway. After a short hike upstream and some quick chemical tests, they fingered an apparent culprit Wednesday morning: chlorinated water draining from a municipal swimming pool. The matter was still under investigation Thursday by the state Department of Environmental Protection, whose officials said they did not know for sure who bore responsibility for the mishap.
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