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Water Supply

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NEWS
February 14, 1987 | By Kenneth Glick, Special to The Inquirer
Medford Township officials and local businessmen met yesterday to discuss how to bring municipal water to the Stokes Road commercial district, the site of a fire that destroyed several stores nearly three weeks ago. About half the township uses municipal water. The other half, including the Stokes Road commercial district, uses private well water. Township Administrator Richard Deaney said preliminary plans call for constructing a complex loop system of water mains around the commercial zone to tie in with an existing municipal water well.
NEWS
October 16, 1986 | By Ruth Tallmadge, Special to The Inquirer
The developer of Charlestown Hunt intends to provide water for the 333 dwellings by extending the main water line from Phoenixville, an engineer testified last week. Consulting engineer Robert Plucienik, representing Realty Engineering Co. of Wayne, was the only witness to appear in the second of the Charlestown Board of Supervisors' hearings on the proposed 133-acre development of houses, townhouses and apartments off Route 29 near Buckwalter Road. The first hearing Oct. 7 drew a crowd of more than 100, but only 25 people were in the audience Oct. 9 as the supervisors questioned Plucienik about water supply and engineering proposals.
NEWS
January 4, 1988 | United Press International Inquirer staff writer Denise-Marie Santiago contributed to this article
Gov. Casey ordered the National Guard yesterday to be ready to provide emergency drinking water to thousands of people whose supplies were endangered when two million gallons of diesel fuel spilled into the Monongahela River and left a 20-mile slick stretching to Pittsburgh. Authorities said some area schools might be closed today because of expected water shortages. Hospital water supplies also might be affected. About 400 residents were forced out of their homes for nearly 12 hours - they were allowed to return yesterday afternoon - after the three-million- gallon diesel fuel tank collapsed, spewing debris that ruptured a nearby gasoline tank, about 5 p.m. Saturday.
NEWS
October 6, 2007 | By Samantha Shepard INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State Rep. Jay Moyer (R., Montgomery) has asked the Public Utility Commission to investigate Pennsylvania-American Water Co. after residents of Whitpain and East Norriton Townships were told to boil their water before drinking it for the third time in three weeks. Moyer said he received "innumerable calls and e-mails" from customers about the failure of the utility's pumping station in Norristown. The water company is asking the PUC for a 15 percent rate increase. "It is simply unacceptable that PAWC would seek to increase its bottom line at the same time they are failing to provide adequate service, and they are endangering the health and safety of my constituents in this way," he said in a letter to the commission.
NEWS
March 12, 1986 | By Paul Horvitz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Two types of chemical contaminants have been detected above acceptable levels in the Camden city water supply, and state environmental officials have given the city a year to improve its water-treatment system. Neither chemical presents an immediate danger, state officials cautioned yesterday as they announced the results of statewide water tests. But left unchecked, they said, the contamination could cause a slight increase in the frequency of cancer cases among people who drink the water over a lifetime.
NEWS
June 14, 1987 | By Lisa Huber, Special to The Inquirer
In East Bradford Township, where the majority of homes use well water, more than 60 residents told the Board of Supervisors they are concerned about the township's underground water supply. At a meeting Tuesday night, the residents said a study should be done of the township's water table and an independent water study should be done before a proposed subdivison, Winchester, is approved. The water table study, proposed to be conducted by the Brandywine Valley Authority, would determine areas of the township that could not handle increased development, said Supervisor John H. Spangler.
NEWS
March 17, 1986 | By David Lieber, Inquirer Staff Writer
The base commander for the Willow Grove Naval Air Station says the Navy will take two years to clean five possible toxic-waste sites at the Horsham Township installation. "Right now, there is no immediate danger," Capt. Thomas H. Hoivik told about 70 people at a luncheon Tuesday sponsored by the Greater Willow Grove Chamber of Commerce. Hoivik said the base's water supply did not appear to be affected by possible contaminants. "It looks OK," he said in response to a question.
NEWS
October 4, 1987 | By Tim Wright, Special to The Inquirer
The Coatesville Water Authority (CWA) has offered to supply water for neighboring Valley Township's burgeoning housing developments, but Valley officials are not sure they want to accept the offer. The township is willing to discuss the issue, but, in the words of supervisors Chairman William Lambert, "This board will not be dictated to. " Talks between Valley officials and members of the CWA about supplying water to Valley Springs, a development of 137 houses under construction, broke down during the summer.
NEWS
May 22, 1988 | By Maureen Graham, Special to The Inquirer
Despite strict water rationing, some officials of Washington Township's water authority fear the township may not have enough water to go around this spring and summer. The potential shortage is causing debate on the Municipal Utilities Authority about whether to deny water for new housing developments - a move that would create a moratorium on construction in the fastest growing township in Gloucester County. At a recent meeting, the board split 3-2 in granting Terruce Corp.
NEWS
December 24, 1987 | By Maureen Graham, Special to The Inquirer
Winslow Township officials acknowledged last night that there were serious problems with water pressure and supply in the Sicklerville section. The committee members told residents of the Avondale West development that they would place a pressure meter at the end of the water lines and would monitor the flow. They said they would take steps to solve the problem by next month. The action came after a petition with 106 signatures was presented. It stated that residents could not take showers on the weekends and had been completely without water several times in the last three months.
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NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
Federal officials say the drinking water in Horsham Township is safe, but with mounting concern over contaminated water and a lack of answers about long-term health effects, officials in the Montgomery County town vowed Monday night to take extra steps to make their water even safer. "We understand that people have lost confidence in our water supply," Township Councilman Gregory Nesbitt told dozens of residents at Monday's meeting, where the council considered actions beyond federal guidelines to reduce the contamination in drinking water to an undetectable amount.
NEWS
June 24, 2016
Philadelphia's water supply doesn't have the high lead levels that endangered public health in Flint, Mich., but the city could do a better job of informing residents of the potential danger of lead leached from pipes in older homes. Lead is a quiet poison that causes long-term damage to almost every system in the body while typically showing no obvious symptoms. Philadelphia children routinely test high for lead levels. Until recently, this was attributed almost exclusively to lead paint, but growing concern about lead-pipe corrosion has brought more attention to the necessity of testing drinking water.
NEWS
June 10, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal and Justine McDaniel, STAFF WRITERS
Pennsylvania's senators and local members of Congress are pressing the Navy to fund blood testing for residents affected by water contamination around former naval air bases in Bucks and Montgomery Counties. That request Tuesday - prompted by health concerns over chemicals that leaked into water supplies, and are linked to cancer and reproductive issues - came on the same day that the consumer advocate Erin Brockovich and a New York-based law firm announced that they would investigate the drinking-water issues in the area.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
The water crisis in Flint, Mich., where residents unknowingly drank water with harmful levels of lead, has brought new scrutiny to public water-supply systems. How does Philadelphia's water rate? Officials will address that question at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University on Tuesday evening. Debra McCarty, the new commissioner of the Philadelphia Water Department, will be joined by Lynn Thorp, national campaigns director for Clean Water Action, and Jerry Fagliano, chair of the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health at Drexel University's Dornsife School of Public Health.
NEWS
April 2, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
Camden's water system has improved in key ways since 2009, the year an audit compared the utility to that of a Third World country, according to a state report released Thursday. The office of the state comptroller found that Camden officials and United Water fully or partially implemented 19 of 23 recommendations made in that 2009 audit. Two recommendations are no longer applicable. "I am encouraged by the improvements the City has made, as well as its continued commitment to further progress," said Philip James Degnan, acting state comptroller, in a statement.
NEWS
March 30, 2016
ISSUE | WATER QUALITY PennEast Pipeline would be safe A letter raised misguided concerns about PennEast Pipeline's application to the Delaware River Basin Commission for a water permit and alleged impacts on waterways ("Stop the pipeline," March 10). The pipeline will deliver low-cost, local natural gas to eastern Pennsylvania and New Jersey families and businesses. The letter stated that PennEast "plans . . . to withdraw more than 45 million gallons of water. " This is a one-time withdrawal used to test the pipeline's integrity prior to its going into service.
NEWS
March 11, 2016
ISSUE | WATER QUALITY Stop the pipeline The PennEast Pipeline Co. has applied for a water permit from the Delaware River Basin Commission that would allow its destructive pipeline to run through the region. According to the application, the company plans to discharge or withdraw more than 45 million gallons of water. The 110-mile pipeline would cut through the Delaware River valley, beginning in Pennsylvania and crossing the river and 87 other waterways, including protected waters, into Hopewell Township, N.J. The application process could take up to a year, and, if rejected, the DRBC could help stop the pipeline.
NEWS
February 21, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
Amid increased concern from residents about a chemical contaminant found in their drinking water, Moorestown on Friday shut down one of its water supply wells. Mayor Phil Garwood announced the immediate shutdown of Well 7 at the North Church Street treatment plant in a letter to residents. "The bottom line is that our water supply is safe, but our water infrastructure is aging and in need of repairs and upgrades to ensure the highest quality water in Moorestown for generations to come," Garwood wrote.
NEWS
January 29, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
The national debate stirred by high levels of lead discovered in the water supply in Flint, Mich., has flowed into Philadelphia. Public health advocates this week said Philadelphia and other cities were failing to follow federal guidelines as they monitor lead levels at high-risk homes. Up to 50,000 homes in Philadelphia are connected to city water mains by lead pipes, according to city officials. Though lead service lines were banned in 1986, they remain in older homes whose owners can't afford to pay for improvements.
NEWS
December 23, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
Camden City Council members voted Monday to hand over operation of the water and sewer system serving most of the city to American Water, the state's largest private water utility. American Water is expected to take over from the current operator, United Water, in February. Before the unanimous vote, Council President Frank Moran said he believed American would remedy problems that have plagued the city for years, such as brown tap water in some parts of Camden. "We live in this great country.
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