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Water Supply

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NEWS
February 14, 1987 | By Kenneth Glick, Special to The Inquirer
Medford Township officials and local businessmen met yesterday to discuss how to bring municipal water to the Stokes Road commercial district, the site of a fire that destroyed several stores nearly three weeks ago. About half the township uses municipal water. The other half, including the Stokes Road commercial district, uses private well water. Township Administrator Richard Deaney said preliminary plans call for constructing a complex loop system of water mains around the commercial zone to tie in with an existing municipal water well.
NEWS
October 16, 1986 | By Ruth Tallmadge, Special to The Inquirer
The developer of Charlestown Hunt intends to provide water for the 333 dwellings by extending the main water line from Phoenixville, an engineer testified last week. Consulting engineer Robert Plucienik, representing Realty Engineering Co. of Wayne, was the only witness to appear in the second of the Charlestown Board of Supervisors' hearings on the proposed 133-acre development of houses, townhouses and apartments off Route 29 near Buckwalter Road. The first hearing Oct. 7 drew a crowd of more than 100, but only 25 people were in the audience Oct. 9 as the supervisors questioned Plucienik about water supply and engineering proposals.
NEWS
January 4, 1988 | United Press International Inquirer staff writer Denise-Marie Santiago contributed to this article
Gov. Casey ordered the National Guard yesterday to be ready to provide emergency drinking water to thousands of people whose supplies were endangered when two million gallons of diesel fuel spilled into the Monongahela River and left a 20-mile slick stretching to Pittsburgh. Authorities said some area schools might be closed today because of expected water shortages. Hospital water supplies also might be affected. About 400 residents were forced out of their homes for nearly 12 hours - they were allowed to return yesterday afternoon - after the three-million- gallon diesel fuel tank collapsed, spewing debris that ruptured a nearby gasoline tank, about 5 p.m. Saturday.
NEWS
October 6, 2007 | By Samantha Shepard INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State Rep. Jay Moyer (R., Montgomery) has asked the Public Utility Commission to investigate Pennsylvania-American Water Co. after residents of Whitpain and East Norriton Townships were told to boil their water before drinking it for the third time in three weeks. Moyer said he received "innumerable calls and e-mails" from customers about the failure of the utility's pumping station in Norristown. The water company is asking the PUC for a 15 percent rate increase. "It is simply unacceptable that PAWC would seek to increase its bottom line at the same time they are failing to provide adequate service, and they are endangering the health and safety of my constituents in this way," he said in a letter to the commission.
NEWS
March 12, 1986 | By Paul Horvitz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Two types of chemical contaminants have been detected above acceptable levels in the Camden city water supply, and state environmental officials have given the city a year to improve its water-treatment system. Neither chemical presents an immediate danger, state officials cautioned yesterday as they announced the results of statewide water tests. But left unchecked, they said, the contamination could cause a slight increase in the frequency of cancer cases among people who drink the water over a lifetime.
NEWS
June 14, 1987 | By Lisa Huber, Special to The Inquirer
In East Bradford Township, where the majority of homes use well water, more than 60 residents told the Board of Supervisors they are concerned about the township's underground water supply. At a meeting Tuesday night, the residents said a study should be done of the township's water table and an independent water study should be done before a proposed subdivison, Winchester, is approved. The water table study, proposed to be conducted by the Brandywine Valley Authority, would determine areas of the township that could not handle increased development, said Supervisor John H. Spangler.
NEWS
March 17, 1986 | By David Lieber, Inquirer Staff Writer
The base commander for the Willow Grove Naval Air Station says the Navy will take two years to clean five possible toxic-waste sites at the Horsham Township installation. "Right now, there is no immediate danger," Capt. Thomas H. Hoivik told about 70 people at a luncheon Tuesday sponsored by the Greater Willow Grove Chamber of Commerce. Hoivik said the base's water supply did not appear to be affected by possible contaminants. "It looks OK," he said in response to a question.
NEWS
October 4, 1987 | By Tim Wright, Special to The Inquirer
The Coatesville Water Authority (CWA) has offered to supply water for neighboring Valley Township's burgeoning housing developments, but Valley officials are not sure they want to accept the offer. The township is willing to discuss the issue, but, in the words of supervisors Chairman William Lambert, "This board will not be dictated to. " Talks between Valley officials and members of the CWA about supplying water to Valley Springs, a development of 137 houses under construction, broke down during the summer.
NEWS
May 22, 1988 | By Maureen Graham, Special to The Inquirer
Despite strict water rationing, some officials of Washington Township's water authority fear the township may not have enough water to go around this spring and summer. The potential shortage is causing debate on the Municipal Utilities Authority about whether to deny water for new housing developments - a move that would create a moratorium on construction in the fastest growing township in Gloucester County. At a recent meeting, the board split 3-2 in granting Terruce Corp.
NEWS
December 24, 1987 | By Maureen Graham, Special to The Inquirer
Winslow Township officials acknowledged last night that there were serious problems with water pressure and supply in the Sicklerville section. The committee members told residents of the Avondale West development that they would place a pressure meter at the end of the water lines and would monitor the flow. They said they would take steps to solve the problem by next month. The action came after a petition with 106 signatures was presented. It stated that residents could not take showers on the weekends and had been completely without water several times in the last three months.
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NEWS
June 18, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of two Moorestown wells - shut down in October because of a chemical contaminant found in the town's water - has been ordered reopened after tests showed the chemical is no longer present. The action Tuesday evening by the Moorestown Township Council came at the recommendation of Township Manager D. Scott Carew, who also called for a pilot study to develop a water treatment plan for the other well at the North Church Street treatment plant. The chemical found in the water last October was 1,2,3-trichloropropane (TCP)
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Navy could be paying upwards of $12 million to filter contaminated drinking water around former military bases in Montgomery and Bucks Counties. Elevated levels of perflourinated compounds, which have been linked to cancer and reproductive issues, were found last year in several drinking water wells in Horsham, Warrington, and Warminster. At an open house in Horsham Wednesday, local officials, and Navy and Environmental Protection Agency representatives said they are making progress on fixing the problem.
NEWS
October 11, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A contaminant not currently regulated by drinking-water standards has been found in Moorestown's water supply, causing town officials to shut down two of its primary wells. The chemical, 1,2,3-trichloropropane, is a man-made and persistent substance used for paint removal and other purposes. It has been classified a "likely" carcinogen by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Moorestown Township Manager D. Scott Carew said Thursday that the decision to shut the wells was made Monday after advice from the state Department of Environmental Protection.
NEWS
July 24, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - State environmental officials failed to adequately monitor Pennsylvania's drinking-water supply and were slow to inform the public about the results of investigations during the height of the natural-gas-drilling expansion, according to an audit released Tuesday. The 146-page report, prepared by Auditor General Eugene DePasquale, was sweeping in its criticism of the Department of Environmental Protection's handling of gas-well inspections, and its failure to provide timely and thorough information to citizens between 2009 and 2012.
NEWS
May 24, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
As thousands of Montgomery County residents and businesses endured a third day without drinking water, a Montgomery County legislator called Thursday for a state hearing to determine how water from a local treatment plant was under risk of becoming contaminated. State Rep. Mike Vereb (R., Montgomery) said officials from the Pennsylvania American Water company need to explain why parts of the system in its Norristown plant ran dry on Tuesday, leading the company to issue a boil-water advisory to 18,000 customers in six municipalities.
BUSINESS
May 13, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
By now, Susan Story should be moved into her new office at the American Water Works Co. Inc. headquarters in Voorhees. "My computer is the first thing I have to have," said Story, 54, who became chief executive of the $2.9 billion utility at the company's annual meeting Friday, replacing president and CEO Jeff Sterba. "I have to have a chair that doesn't make my back hurt, and I have to have a picture of my husband and myself and our two dogs and that's about it," said Story, who joined the company April 1, 2013, as senior vice president and chief financial officer.
NEWS
May 1, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
LAWRENCEVILLE, N.J. After a hiatus of more than three years that had upset environmentalists, the state's advisory panel for drinking water standards reconvened Tuesday and immediately began considering regulations for a contaminant that has disconcerted several South Jersey towns. The Drinking Water Quality Institute's meeting was its first since September 2010. Half of the panel is new, either appointed or ex-officio since then. The institute was created in 1983 to make regulatory recommendations to the state Department of Environmental Protection.
NEWS
February 20, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
PAULSBORO For the first time in months of public concern about Paulsboro's contaminated water supply, state and local officials addressed residents Tuesday night in a packed auditorium at Paulsboro High School. Many residents expressed frustration during the nearly 21/2-hour meeting, and many answers were not immediately available. The borough's water supply has elevated levels of a perfluorinated compound (PFC) known as perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA). There are no state or federal regulations for PFC levels in water, and the health effects of the compounds remain unclear.
NEWS
January 25, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
PAULSBORO Days after Paulsboro pleaded for state intervention to deal with a contaminated water supply, the state Department of Environmental Protection has advised residents to use bottled water when feeding children up to age 1. Paulsboro officials were expected to post the information to the borough's website Friday, and to issue a letter from the mayor along with the state guidance through the mail. The borough's Well No. 7, a primary water source, has elevated levels of a certain type of perfluorinated compound (PFC)
NEWS
November 30, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
One in a series of occasional articles about the regional effects of climate change and how we're coping. Deep inside the massive steel tank, the light glowed eerily from the freshly painted surface. The voices of visitors who had slithered through a narrow portal echoed. The soon-to-be refilled vessel, rising from a Limerick Township field, is more than 30 feet high and 75 feet across. It holds a million gallons of drinking water, enough to cover a football field to a depth of four feet.
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