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Water System

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BUSINESS
December 10, 2007
Mark Kropilak   Senior vice president of corporate development - i.e. the growth guy - for Aqua America, the water utility holding company based in Bryn Mawr. Under Kropilak's steady hand, the company has morphed from regional company to national player, serving more than 2.8 million residents in more than a dozen states. And he's not just a salesman: Kropilak, his wife and two teenage sons live in Valley Forge, in an Aqua-serviced area. No Brita water filters at his house: He joked that the water is so pure, "I don't even use a cup. " How he got into the water game: Kropilak was first driven by legal aspirations.
NEWS
April 5, 1992 | By Ronda Sharpe, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Hulmeville's new water system probably won't be in operation until around July. Ferdinand Reetz, chairman of the Hulmeville Borough Water and Sewer Authority, had hoped the system would be ready by May 1, but "I really don't think it's going to happen that quick," he said at the Wednesday night meeting. When completed, the $1 million system will provide access to public water to the two-thirds of the borough's residents who currently use well-water. Water authority officials had no information on the exact number of meters needed or whether they will be paid for by the borough or by residents.
NEWS
March 5, 1992 | By Ronda Sharpe, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Nearly 300 Hulmeville Borough residents will soon be able to tap into the public water system for a $45 fee. The Hulmeville Borough Council agreed Monday night to get the ball rolling on hooking up residents' homes to the public water supply. The decision will affect residents who rely on wells for their water, which is about two-thirds of the borough households. Each household will have to pay $20 for a plumbing permit and $25 for a plumber's inspection. Details of the new water system were tentatively scheduled to be discussed by the borough's water authority last night.
NEWS
March 30, 1989 | By Harold Shelly, Special to The Inquirer
In a unanimous vote at its Monday night meeting, the New Hope Borough Council authorized borough officials to negotiate with Condor Properties on a proposed water system at a planned development next to Village 2. The system would ultimately become the property of the borough. Condor wants to build 525 condominium units, to be called The Crest at New Hope, next to the more-than-300-unit Village 2 in the southeastern sector of the borough. There is not enough water pressure or volume to permit hooking up to the existing system.
NEWS
December 31, 1989 | By Daniel Kaufman, Special to The Inquirer
The $1.95 million bond issue included in Phoenixville's 1990 budget is designed to finance major improvements next year in the water and sewer systems, according to borough manager Bill Herman. Expensive but needed capital projects such as the replacement of water mains, tank repairs and removal of sludge from the sewer and water plants have been given short shrift under previous administrations, Herman said. "We're trying to cope with growth, and we've got to have a solid foundation on which to build.
NEWS
August 27, 1989 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Five years ago, then-newly appointed Phoenixville Borough manager William P. Herman made a decision to bring into the modern age one of the municipality's biggest dinosaurs - its drinking water system. Parts of the cast-iron infrastructure, built in 1872, had fallen into disrepair after decades of little maintenance and much neglect. That had begun to noticeably affect the quality of the water, so much so that the popular opinion in Phoenixville was that the water was no good to drink.
NEWS
October 10, 2011
Aqua America Inc., Bryn Mawr, said today that it paid $126,000 to buy a water system serving the Dancing Bear subdivision in Medina County, Texas, near San Antonio. The development's population is expected to grow from 200 people to 2,000 as it builds out.     - Andrew Maykuth
NEWS
December 5, 1991 | By Edward Ohlbaum, Special to The Inquirer
Buckingham officials are seeking to block a proposed privately owned water system to serve up to 1,898 new homes in the township's northwestern corner. Most of the homes will be built on farmland for which a Bucks County Court judge granted development rights in 1976 as a "curative amendment" to what the court had ruled was a municipal zoning ordinance that unlawfully excluded so-called affordable or high-density housing in the township. In a filing Monday with the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission in Harrisburg, the township's Board of Supervisors urged dismissal of an application by Buckingham Water Co. Inc. to operate a water system to serve several curative-amendment subdivisions to be built along Cold Spring Creamery Road.
NEWS
September 4, 1987 | By Mary Lou Jerrell, Special to The Inquirer
The Gloucester City Council unanimously approved a $1.5 million bond issue last night for rehabilitating the city's water system. Under a state mandate of earlier this year, the city must spend $1.5 million to improve its water system by building a new water-storage tank, redrilling one of its wells and replacing water mains by the beginning of 1989, according to Councilman John Brandt, chairman of the city's Water Department. The current system, built in the early 1900s, is deteriorating.
NEWS
July 5, 1992 | By Ronda Sharpe, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Hulmeville residents will have to wait a little longer for their new water system. The $1 million system, originally to be completed by May, was pushed back to early this month but still has not been finished. "I'm hopeful for sometime in July, (but) I have no idea," said Ferdinand Reetz, Hulmeville Borough Water Authority chairman, at Wednesday night's water authority meeting. The main reason for the delay is that master water meters have not arrived. They must be inspected and tested before being put into use. Reetz said he expected the borough to have the master meters within the next two weeks.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 20, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Aqua America Inc., of Bryn Mawr, announced Tuesday that its Virginia subsidiary has purchased four water systems and a wastewater system for $257,501. The systems, which serve about 1,500 people, will require more than $1.6 million in investments to bring into regulatory compliance. The largest transaction involves the Presidential Service Company, which serves 1,000 people in a subdivision in King George, Va. Aqua paid $150,000 for the water system and plans to spend about $200,000 in improvements.
NEWS
January 25, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
PAULSBORO Days after Paulsboro pleaded for state intervention to deal with a contaminated water supply, the state Department of Environmental Protection has advised residents to use bottled water when feeding children up to age 1. Paulsboro officials were expected to post the information to the borough's website Friday, and to issue a letter from the mayor along with the state guidance through the mail. The borough's Well No. 7, a primary water source, has elevated levels of a certain type of perfluorinated compound (PFC)
BUSINESS
January 20, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
All businesses are at the mercy of their supply chain. Few are as vulnerable as a water utility. Witness West Virginia Water, a subsidiary of American Water Works Co. of Voorhees. On Jan. 9, a sweet licorice odor was noticed in the air around the Elk River as it wound its way south through Charleston, the state capital. The source was identified as 7,500 gallons of a chemical known as MCHM that had leaked from a 35,000-gallon tank belonging to Freedom Industries. The spill occurred less than a mile upstream from West Virginia Water's intake facilities.
NEWS
December 8, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
HOPEWELL, N.J. Rain fell Friday on south-central New Jersey, and a part of it flowed into Baldwin's Creek. Some flowed, too, into Duck Pond Run, and Six Mile Run, and Cranbury Brook, Devil's Brook, and Peace Brook, and into dozens more creeks and streams bearing names like Little Bear, Duck Pond, and Ten Mile, that flowed into the Stony Brook, that streamed past a white tent in Hopewell Township, Mercer County. There, 100 people and 10 waiting shovels were gathered at the Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed Association.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Scott Gurian, NJ SPOTLIGHT
As Atlantic County Utility Authority president Richard Dovey sees it, the reason New Jersey's water and sewer systems need more than $40 billion in repairs can be partially explained by two events that took place in Atlantic County recently. Earlier this month, authorities closed Atlantic City's Ohio Avenue Bridge - a vital link to the neighborhood of Venice Park - after engineers found the structure was in need of emergency repairs. The move attracted a fair amount of media coverage and attention from local residents, who could see the police tape blocking their usual route and knew they had to take a detour.
NEWS
April 5, 2013
THIS IS A letter in response to the editorial "Liquid Assets: A bottled-water ban has merit, but it's not crystal clear. " I sincerely congratulate the Daily News for having published an article which so articulately elucidates the problems of allowing national parks to continue to sell bottled water. As the article states, when discussing the issue of the sale of bottled water, there inevitably gets asked the question of whether water should be seen and treated federally as a human right.
NEWS
April 3, 2013
Independence National Historical Park should embrace the virtues of another priceless public asset with Philadelphia roots: tap water. Last week, the group Corporate Accountability International began urging prominent national parks to stop sales of bottled water within their boundaries on the grounds that "one national treasure (our parks) shouldn't be used to sell another (our water). " The National Park Service lets each of its parks decide whether to ban bottled water, and several have done so. While a few more parks wouldn't make much of a dent in the behemoth bottled-water industry, they could lead the way in encouraging the public to drink the water we already own. Independence National Park is in the right place to promote public water and its accompanying benefits.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
American Water Works' Pennsylvania subsidiary acquired two water systems in northeast Pennsylvania for $1.65 million, adding about 640 accounts or about 1,700 people to its existing water system. Pennsylvania American Water purchased the system of the Indian Rocks Property Owners Association, serving approximately 465 households in Salem Township, Wayne County. In Lackawanna County, the company acquired the Olwen Heights Water Company, which serves about 175 accounts in Roaring Brook Township.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2013
In the Region   Reps don't want knives on planes   U.S. Rep. Bob Brady, a Philadelphia Democrat, said he and other House members would press the U.S. Transportation Security Administration to reverse its decision allowing knives on passenger airplanes. A group of lawmakers including Reps. Bennie Thompson (D., Miss.), Eric Swalwell (D., Calif.), and Michael Grimm (R., N.Y.) said they would send a "formal bipartisan letter" to TSA Administrator John Pistole urging the agency to reconsider its policy permitting passengers to carry small knives and sporting equipment, such as golf clubs and toy baseball bats, in carry-on luggage.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Abbey Color Inc., a Philadelphia industrial-dye manufacturer, has been sent a warning letter by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration saying it has failed to ensure adequate purity of the water in an eye-examination product it makes. Fluorescein is a sterile liquid dye used in assessing blood flow in the retina and choroid at the back of the eye. The warning letter said the FDA inspected the company facility on East Tioga Street in the city's Kensington section March 13 to 23. The company's reply to the FDA's observations was not acceptable, the agency said.
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