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Water System

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BUSINESS
December 10, 2007
Mark Kropilak   Senior vice president of corporate development - i.e. the growth guy - for Aqua America, the water utility holding company based in Bryn Mawr. Under Kropilak's steady hand, the company has morphed from regional company to national player, serving more than 2.8 million residents in more than a dozen states. And he's not just a salesman: Kropilak, his wife and two teenage sons live in Valley Forge, in an Aqua-serviced area. No Brita water filters at his house: He joked that the water is so pure, "I don't even use a cup. " How he got into the water game: Kropilak was first driven by legal aspirations.
NEWS
April 5, 1992 | By Ronda Sharpe, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Hulmeville's new water system probably won't be in operation until around July. Ferdinand Reetz, chairman of the Hulmeville Borough Water and Sewer Authority, had hoped the system would be ready by May 1, but "I really don't think it's going to happen that quick," he said at the Wednesday night meeting. When completed, the $1 million system will provide access to public water to the two-thirds of the borough's residents who currently use well-water. Water authority officials had no information on the exact number of meters needed or whether they will be paid for by the borough or by residents.
NEWS
March 5, 1992 | By Ronda Sharpe, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Nearly 300 Hulmeville Borough residents will soon be able to tap into the public water system for a $45 fee. The Hulmeville Borough Council agreed Monday night to get the ball rolling on hooking up residents' homes to the public water supply. The decision will affect residents who rely on wells for their water, which is about two-thirds of the borough households. Each household will have to pay $20 for a plumbing permit and $25 for a plumber's inspection. Details of the new water system were tentatively scheduled to be discussed by the borough's water authority last night.
NEWS
March 30, 1989 | By Harold Shelly, Special to The Inquirer
In a unanimous vote at its Monday night meeting, the New Hope Borough Council authorized borough officials to negotiate with Condor Properties on a proposed water system at a planned development next to Village 2. The system would ultimately become the property of the borough. Condor wants to build 525 condominium units, to be called The Crest at New Hope, next to the more-than-300-unit Village 2 in the southeastern sector of the borough. There is not enough water pressure or volume to permit hooking up to the existing system.
NEWS
December 31, 1989 | By Daniel Kaufman, Special to The Inquirer
The $1.95 million bond issue included in Phoenixville's 1990 budget is designed to finance major improvements next year in the water and sewer systems, according to borough manager Bill Herman. Expensive but needed capital projects such as the replacement of water mains, tank repairs and removal of sludge from the sewer and water plants have been given short shrift under previous administrations, Herman said. "We're trying to cope with growth, and we've got to have a solid foundation on which to build.
NEWS
August 27, 1989 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Five years ago, then-newly appointed Phoenixville Borough manager William P. Herman made a decision to bring into the modern age one of the municipality's biggest dinosaurs - its drinking water system. Parts of the cast-iron infrastructure, built in 1872, had fallen into disrepair after decades of little maintenance and much neglect. That had begun to noticeably affect the quality of the water, so much so that the popular opinion in Phoenixville was that the water was no good to drink.
NEWS
October 10, 2011
Aqua America Inc., Bryn Mawr, said today that it paid $126,000 to buy a water system serving the Dancing Bear subdivision in Medina County, Texas, near San Antonio. The development's population is expected to grow from 200 people to 2,000 as it builds out.     - Andrew Maykuth
NEWS
December 5, 1991 | By Edward Ohlbaum, Special to The Inquirer
Buckingham officials are seeking to block a proposed privately owned water system to serve up to 1,898 new homes in the township's northwestern corner. Most of the homes will be built on farmland for which a Bucks County Court judge granted development rights in 1976 as a "curative amendment" to what the court had ruled was a municipal zoning ordinance that unlawfully excluded so-called affordable or high-density housing in the township. In a filing Monday with the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission in Harrisburg, the township's Board of Supervisors urged dismissal of an application by Buckingham Water Co. Inc. to operate a water system to serve several curative-amendment subdivisions to be built along Cold Spring Creamery Road.
NEWS
September 4, 1987 | By Mary Lou Jerrell, Special to The Inquirer
The Gloucester City Council unanimously approved a $1.5 million bond issue last night for rehabilitating the city's water system. Under a state mandate of earlier this year, the city must spend $1.5 million to improve its water system by building a new water-storage tank, redrilling one of its wells and replacing water mains by the beginning of 1989, according to Councilman John Brandt, chairman of the city's Water Department. The current system, built in the early 1900s, is deteriorating.
NEWS
July 5, 1992 | By Ronda Sharpe, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Hulmeville residents will have to wait a little longer for their new water system. The $1 million system, originally to be completed by May, was pushed back to early this month but still has not been finished. "I'm hopeful for sometime in July, (but) I have no idea," said Ferdinand Reetz, Hulmeville Borough Water Authority chairman, at Wednesday night's water authority meeting. The main reason for the delay is that master water meters have not arrived. They must be inspected and tested before being put into use. Reetz said he expected the borough to have the master meters within the next two weeks.
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NEWS
July 16, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
Horsham Township will get $10 million in state funding to clean up drinking water contaminated with chemicals from the now shuttered naval base in Willow Grove. With that money, local officials will develop steps beyond those taken by the Navy and Environmental Protection Agency to ensure that their drinking water is safe. Rep. Todd Stephens (R., Montgomery) said he fought for the money for his township because he was "increasingly frustrated" with the response from federal agencies.
NEWS
April 2, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
Camden's water system has improved in key ways since 2009, the year an audit compared the utility to that of a Third World country, according to a state report released Thursday. The office of the state comptroller found that Camden officials and United Water fully or partially implemented 19 of 23 recommendations made in that 2009 audit. Two recommendations are no longer applicable. "I am encouraged by the improvements the City has made, as well as its continued commitment to further progress," said Philip James Degnan, acting state comptroller, in a statement.
NEWS
February 21, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
Amid increased concern from residents about a chemical contaminant found in their drinking water, Moorestown on Friday shut down one of its water supply wells. Mayor Phil Garwood announced the immediate shutdown of Well 7 at the North Church Street treatment plant in a letter to residents. "The bottom line is that our water supply is safe, but our water infrastructure is aging and in need of repairs and upgrades to ensure the highest quality water in Moorestown for generations to come," Garwood wrote.
NEWS
February 6, 2016 | By Brian X. McCrone, STAFF WRITER
In response to increasing inquiries about lead poisoning - attention largely spurred by the health crisis in Flint, Mich. - Pennsylvania state health officials Thursday released information and guidelines to help reduce the risk of exposure. The primary source of lead poisoning is not from water, but rather from aging, deteriorating lead-based paint, the state Health Department said. Although lead paint was banned in 1978, many older homes still contain the toxic substance.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
Aqua America Inc., of Bryn Mawr, has acquired a private Montgomery County water utility that serves a growing part of Southeastern Pennsylvania. Aqua's Pennsylvania subsidiary bought Superior Water Co. Inc. in Gilbertsville for $16.8 million in stock Monday. Superior's five water systems serve 3,868 customers in Berks, Chester, and Montgomery Counties. The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission, which approved the merger Sept. 17, said the ownership change will be transparent to Superior's customers, who will continue to receive service under the same rates and terms.
NEWS
December 1, 2015
M OHAMED ZERBAN, 21, and Connor White, 23, both of Center City, are co-founders and CEO and COO, respectively, of Ternwater Inc., a Drexel University-based startup. Ternwater is developing a sustainable and modular product to monitor household water. It plans to launch a $50,000 Kickstarter campaign in March to bring the initial product to market. I spoke with Zerban.   Q: How'd you come up with the idea? A: I designed a small windmill for home use during my freshman year at Drexel and did my first co-op at the Philadelphia Water Department in 2013.
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
The push to supply clean water to those affected by contamination spanning several Gloucester County towns is set to progress in West Deptford, where officials voted Wednesday night to move to connect certain properties with private wells to public water. The town, under an agreement with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection outlined at a township committee meeting, plans to install a new water-main extension to provide municipal water to three houses on Clement Drive, where high levels of the contaminant, perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA)
BUSINESS
March 20, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Aqua America Inc., of Bryn Mawr, announced Tuesday that its Virginia subsidiary has purchased four water systems and a wastewater system for $257,501. The systems, which serve about 1,500 people, will require more than $1.6 million in investments to bring into regulatory compliance. The largest transaction involves the Presidential Service Company, which serves 1,000 people in a subdivision in King George, Va. Aqua paid $150,000 for the water system and plans to spend about $200,000 in improvements.
NEWS
January 25, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
PAULSBORO Days after Paulsboro pleaded for state intervention to deal with a contaminated water supply, the state Department of Environmental Protection has advised residents to use bottled water when feeding children up to age 1. Paulsboro officials were expected to post the information to the borough's website Friday, and to issue a letter from the mayor along with the state guidance through the mail. The borough's Well No. 7, a primary water source, has elevated levels of a certain type of perfluorinated compound (PFC)
BUSINESS
January 20, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
All businesses are at the mercy of their supply chain. Few are as vulnerable as a water utility. Witness West Virginia Water, a subsidiary of American Water Works Co. of Voorhees. On Jan. 9, a sweet licorice odor was noticed in the air around the Elk River as it wound its way south through Charleston, the state capital. The source was identified as 7,500 gallons of a chemical known as MCHM that had leaked from a 35,000-gallon tank belonging to Freedom Industries. The spill occurred less than a mile upstream from West Virginia Water's intake facilities.
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