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Water Tower

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NEWS
September 18, 2000 | By Vicki McClure, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The $258,000 clocks are frozen in time, each accurate for only two minutes a day when the universe happens to catch it at the right moment. Hung high on the water tower at the northeast entrance of town two years ago, the three neon-blue clocks have been plagued with problems ever since. The minute hands caught fire in 1998 and last fall. Bulbs have frequently shorted out. And the clocks - on the north, east and west sides of the tower - could not keep the same time. Now, a month after the hands have been redesigned and reinstalled, two of the clocks refuse to budge.
NEWS
July 7, 2000 | By Will Van Sant, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The state Department of Environmental Protection has rejected a loan application from the Waterford Municipal Utilities Authority, citing an apparent inability to move forward on well and water-tower construction projects the authority hopes to finance. In 1995, the authority applied for about $2 million under the DEP's bond loan program to pay for the projects, which are integral to completion of Waterford's ambitious water and sewer construction plans. The township has had problems with groundwater contamination.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | By Louis R. Carlozo, Special to The Inquirer
It's been a South Jersey landmark since 1961: the first thing motorists see on the northbound New Jersey Turnpike or Interstate 295 after they get a whiff of that strong coffee aroma from the Melitta factory. After facing countless rainstorms, relentless heat waves, low-flying birds, would-be graffiti artists and the usual wear and tear of 10 years, Cherry Hill's water tower on Kresson Road is getting a fresh coat of paint. When the job is finished - probably by the end of the year - the white colossus will greet motorists with a new twist: A cherry logo and the greeting "Welcome to Cherry Hill.
NEWS
March 31, 1991 | By Ward Allebach, Special to The Inquirer
Officials confirmed last week that the long-defunct Montgomeryville Merchandise Mart property might be the key to pleasing almost everyone in the uproar over where to put a proposed 105-foot, 2.8 million-gallon water tower. "There's a big challenge here to bring this together," said Montgomery Township Supervisors Vice Chairman Robert Simpson Jr. "And if we can all stay constructive . . . there's a reasonable chance we will. " The township needs water to meet the demands of a growing population, and, after a storm of local opposition this month over a proposed site for a new North Wales Water Authority water tower, the mart is emerging as the next best place to put the tower.
NEWS
March 18, 1986 | By Kim Zimmermann, Special to The Inquirer
About 70 residents from the Devonshire housing tract showed up en masse at last night's Mount Laurel council meeting to protest a proposed water tower. The council listened, voting 6-0 to reject the sale of a parcel of land to the township's Municipal Utilities Authority, which was seeking to build the 165-foot-high tower on the Marne Highway in the Devonshire neighborhood. The tower, projected to cost $886,000, would hold a half-million gallons of water. In an hour-long public session, residents voiced concerns about the aesthetics and safety of the tower.
NEWS
December 7, 2012 | By Aubrey Whelan and Carolyn Davis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Officials have identified the worker killed when he fell into an empty water tower yesterday in Lower Providence Township, and the man saved in a dramatic rescue. Jason Schmidt, 31, of Jacobus, York County, was pronounced dead at the scene of the accident, officials said this morning. The second man, who was suspended in midair for over three hours in a safety harness, was identified as Miguel Martinez, 38, of Pennsgrove, Salem County. Martinez was taken to Paoli Memorial Hospital.
NEWS
March 14, 1991 | By Ward Allebach, Special to The Inquirer
It looked like a done deal: Contracts had been signed; the Montgomery Township supervisors had approved development; permits had been acquired. The North Wales Water Authority Board of Directors had only to give the word at its Tuesday night meeting, and construction could have begun yesterday on a 2.8 million gallon, 105-foot water tower in Montgomery Township. But, pressured by residents living near the site for the proposed tower, the board didn't give the word. Although they weren't optimistic about finding an alternative site, the five members of the authority board agreed to delay action to meet with the township supervisors and residents who oppose the tower.
NEWS
October 15, 1986 | By Marybeth Farrell, Special to The Inquirer
Motorists traveling along Interstate 295 may see a huge, balloonlike object towering in the horizon within the next year in West Deptford Township. To a child's eye, the object may resemble a giant ship from outer space. But no matter what the proposed water storage tank resembles, it looks like one may soon be constructed in the township. For the past six years, residents and businesses in the Gloucester County community have used more water than the township can supply, according to Edward Phelps, the township's superintendent of water and sewers.
NEWS
May 8, 1988 | By Tim Wright, Special to The Inquirer
The leader of a citizens' group in Valley Township was prepared last week to continue a legal battle against a water tower that is a key to residential development in the township. The Rev. Joshua Grove 2d of Meadowbrook Drive said he formed a citizens' group to protest the tower as soon as he realized it was being constructed next door. The group is called Valley Township Concerned Citizens. Mr. Grove and about 40 Valley residents attended a supervisors' meeting last month to complain that the water tower would reduce the value of their properties and dry up their wells.
NEWS
February 19, 1989 | By Marjorie Keen, Special to The Inquirer
The 90-foot sky-blue water tower erected last year in Valley Township's Quiet Village section can remain in place, Chester County Common Pleas Judge Thomas G. Gavin ruled last week. Approximately 200 neighbors had appealed first to the township and then to the court to outlaw the 150,000-gallon elevated tank, which they called an eyesore. "While I can sympathize with the plight of the Valley Township Concerned Citizens and readily understand their desire not to have a water tower visible from their properties," Gavin wrote in his decision, "I cannot conclude that a properly constructed tower is in the least bit offensive from other than an aesthetic viewpoint.
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NEWS
September 1, 2013 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
LONGPORT, N.J. - Mayor Nicholas Russo has a smile on his face, but his borough does not. All summer without a smile. This has nothing to do with Sandy, which crashed through this affluent beach town nearly a year ago. This missing smiley face is that smiley face, the one on the Longport water tower, which vanished earlier this year during a routine tower repainting and has yet to return. The loss of Longport's smiley face has unexpectedly plunged the borough into despair.
NEWS
December 13, 2012 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
As he was lowered into the empty water tower to rescue a man dangling 60 feet above the ground, Robert Myers stayed focused on a fundamental principle: Don't look down. "There wasn't a lot of thought - other than reverting back to training," he said. Shortly after 11 a.m. last Wednesday, Myers' Norristown fire company received an urgent call from the Lower Providence Fire Department. Two men had been performing a maintenance operation inside an empty water tower on Featherbed Lane when their equipment evidently malfunctioned.
NEWS
December 12, 2012 | By Aubrey Whelan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As he was lowered into the empty water tower to rescue a man dangling 60 feet above the ground, Robert Myers stayed focused on a fundamental principle: Don't look down. "There wasn't a lot of thought - other than reverting back to training," he said. Shortly after 11 a.m. last Wednesday, Myers' Norristown fire company received an urgent call from the Lower Providence Fire Department. Two men had been performing a maintenance operation inside an empty water tower on Featherbed Lane when their equipment evidently malfunctioned.
NEWS
December 7, 2012 | By Aubrey Whelan and Carolyn Davis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Officials have identified the worker killed when he fell into an empty water tower yesterday in Lower Providence Township, and the man saved in a dramatic rescue. Jason Schmidt, 31, of Jacobus, York County, was pronounced dead at the scene of the accident, officials said this morning. The second man, who was suspended in midair for over three hours in a safety harness, was identified as Miguel Martinez, 38, of Pennsgrove, Salem County. Martinez was taken to Paoli Memorial Hospital.
NEWS
December 6, 2012 | By Aubrey Whelan and Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writers
After a maintenance worker fell to his death inside an empty water tower in Lower Providence Township on Wednesday, a second worker was left dangling by his safety harness - more than 40 feet off the ground - for more than three hours. That man was finally removed from the 80-foot-tall aqua tower after a dramatic rescue that involved dozens of emergency personnel and a firefighter who climbed into the tower with a safety rope. Neither the deceased man, whose body was removed from the base of the tower, nor his colleague, who was taken to a local hospital, was identified.
NEWS
December 6, 2012 | By Aubrey Whelan and Carolyn Davis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
One worker was killed when he fell into an empty water tower this morning in Lower Providence Township, Montgomery County, and a second worker, trapped for over three hours, has been rescued. Officials said the two, who were not identified, worked for a Salem County company hired to perform maintenance at the 100-foot aqua-colored tower, owned by the Audubon Water Authority. A third employee was uninjured. Just after 11 a.m., a workman who fell to the bottom of the tank was killed.
NEWS
March 13, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - The pregnant woman's body was found on a rooftop more than two decades ago after a horrific attack: Her head was missing. Veronica Bowen's boyfriend was charged yesterday, with murdering her out of jealousy in 1989, five years before he would kill another of his girlfriends in the city's suburbs. Already imprisoned for the second slaying, Philip Ward pleaded not guilty to murdering Bowen, though prosecutors say he recently confessed to a crime in which he'd long been under suspicion.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2011 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amos Oz is one of the best-known people in all Israel, one of the world's best-known writers, and author of the newly published Scenes From Village Life. He's also often mentioned in connection with the Nobel Prize. Problem: With all that freight on the name Amos Oz , people expect everything you write to be about Israel. Oz - who will give a free reading at the Free Library at 12:15 p.m. Friday - isn't thrilled, but he understands. "Any literature from a troubled part of the world is bound to be read as an allegory about life in that part of the world," he says, speaking by phone from New York.
NEWS
May 2, 2011 | By Alicia Caldwell, Associated Press
Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano toured hard-hit neighborhoods of Alabama and Mississippi on Sunday to offer condolences and pledge support for local residents and emergency workers. She met briefly with two sisters whose home was destroyed by last week's storms in Birmingham. Stephanie Anderson and Sheila Hurd were collecting clothes strewn across the street from the debris that was their mother's home. Anderson thanked Napolitano for coming to the area and told her that she appreciated the efforts of everyone who has responded, including the rescue workers who recovered her mother's remains.
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