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Water Wells

NEWS
August 13, 1989 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chester County's building slowdown is causing some belt-tightening at the Health Department. Income from applications for licenses for new sewer systems dropped significantly during the first half of the year, forcing the department to lay off some employees and streamline some offices. Revenue from other types of permits partially offset the decline. The department has eliminated one supervisory position and frozen three full-time jobs and two part-time jobs, said John Maher, the Health Department's director.
NEWS
February 6, 1998 | By Bridget Eklund, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The state Department of Environmental Protection shut down the operation of 202 Island Car Wash and Mobil Oil Corp. yesterday, saying the business had repeatedly refused to provide the state with its leak detection records. The refusal to provide records comes after the DEP's yearlong inspections of 58 homeowner water wells, of which more than half showed trace amounts of petroleum products. "Our inspectors have determined that the closest possible source to these homes for these petroleum products is this business," said John Gerdelmann, the DEP's community relations coordinator.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Federal regulators said Thursday that they would deliver drinking water to four households near natural gas wells in the embattled town of Dimock, casting doubt on Pennsylvania's decision to allow a Marcellus Shale operator to halt deliveries in December. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency also said it would conduct its own water sampling at 61 homes in the rural Susquehanna County township "to further assess whether any residents are being exposed to hazardous substances that cause health concerns.
NEWS
May 17, 2011 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection on Tuesday fined Chesapeake Energy Corp. $1.1 million for violations related to natural gas drilling activities, the largest penalty ever against a Marcellus Shale operator. Under a consent order, Chesapeake will pay $900,000 for contaminating private water supplies in Bradford County. Under a second agreement, Chesapeake will pay $188,000 for a Feb. 23 tank fire at its drilling site in Avella, Washington County. Chesapeake is the largest operator working in Pennsylvania's Marcellus Shale, a gas-rich formation that has triggered a bonanza of drilling activity in the last three years.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the latest salvo over Marcellus Shale gas drilling in the embattled town of Dimock, a natural gas company on Tuesday alleged that federal regulators had cherry-picked old test data to distort the amount of contamination in drinking-water wells. Cabot Oil & Gas Co., whose drilling was blamed for the pollution, said that the drinking-water tests the Environmental Protection Agency used to justify its Jan. 19 order to deliver fresh water supplies to four Dimock houses "do not accurately represent the water quality" and are inconsistent with the body of data collected at the residences.
NEWS
October 23, 1998 | By Candace Heckman and Maureen Graham, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Commotion over mercury found recently in private South Jersey water wells sparked fury this week among local officials who were told that the state may cut funds for a federal project aimed at finding sources of the water contamination. But officials from the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection said yesterday they are committed to providing money to fund the project. Members of the Tri-County Water Quality Management Board, which oversees water quality in Burlington, Camden and Gloucester Counties, adopted a resolution Wednesday notifying the DEP of the board's concern with decisions that could cancel state funding for the mercury tests, said Mike Ontko, the board's coordinator.
BUSINESS
November 10, 2010 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
A state agency approved $12 million in financing Tuesday to extend municipal water service to 18 rural Susquehanna County residents whose wells, regulators say, were contaminated by Marcellus Shale natural-gas drilling. The Pennsylvania Infrastructure Investment Authority board (Pennvest) voted in Harrisburg to approve the controversial project over the objections of Cabot Oil & Gas Co., the gas operator the state Department of Environmental Protection says will have to pay for the water main.
NEWS
March 16, 1989 | By Lisa Scheid, Special to The Inquirer
The Octorara school board on Monday night accepted bids to create a "mini- water-treatment plant" at Octorara's 53-acre campus that would tie the schools' water wells into a single water-purification system. The system would replace water pumps and piping of the district's three wells and add a 100,000-gallon holding tank, said Superintendent Richard P. McAdams. Some of the piping is more than 30 years old, he said. The plant would add a mechanical filtration process to the current chemical purification system, said McAdams.
NEWS
June 13, 2000 | By Zlati Meyer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Verna Fluck, 68, of Bedminster, wasn't a very good hostess. Two dozen people were gathered on her back patio yesterday, and she couldn't even serve them glasses of cold water to cool off from the day's mugginess - because her water well is contaminated with the gasoline additive methyl tertiary butyl ether, or MTBE. The neighbors, politicians and reporters gathered for a news conference by U.S. Rep. James C. Greenwood (R., Pa.) had to do without. Greenwood visited the Flucks to announce he will introduce legislation Friday giving the Environmental Protection Agency the authority to control or further limit MTBE, a chemical added to oxygenate gas to reduce carbon-monoxide emissions and damage to the ozone.
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