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Water Wells

BUSINESS
January 20, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Federal regulators said Thursday that they would deliver drinking water to four households near natural gas wells in the embattled town of Dimock, casting doubt on Pennsylvania's decision to allow a Marcellus Shale operator to halt deliveries in December. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency also said it would conduct its own water sampling at 61 homes in the rural Susquehanna County township "to further assess whether any residents are being exposed to hazardous substances that cause health concerns.
NEWS
January 31, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the latest salvo over Marcellus Shale gas drilling in the embattled town of Dimock, a natural-gas company on Tuesday alleged that federal regulators had cherry-picked old test data to distort the amount of contamination in drinking-water wells. Cabot Oil and Gas Co., whose drilling was blamed for the pollution, said that the drinking-water tests the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency used to justify its Jan. 19 order to deliver fresh water supplies to four Dimock residences "do not accurately represent the water quality" and are inconsistent with the body of data collected at the residences.
NEWS
May 17, 2011 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection on Tuesday fined Chesapeake Energy Corp. $1.1 million for violations related to natural gas drilling activities, the largest penalty ever against a Marcellus Shale operator. Under a consent order, Chesapeake will pay $900,000 for contaminating private water supplies in Bradford County. Under a second agreement, Chesapeake will pay $188,000 for a Feb. 23 tank fire at its drilling site in Avella, Washington County. Chesapeake is the largest operator working in Pennsylvania's Marcellus Shale, a gas-rich formation that has triggered a bonanza of drilling activity in the last three years.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the latest salvo over Marcellus Shale gas drilling in the embattled town of Dimock, a natural gas company on Tuesday alleged that federal regulators had cherry-picked old test data to distort the amount of contamination in drinking-water wells. Cabot Oil & Gas Co., whose drilling was blamed for the pollution, said that the drinking-water tests the Environmental Protection Agency used to justify its Jan. 19 order to deliver fresh water supplies to four Dimock houses "do not accurately represent the water quality" and are inconsistent with the body of data collected at the residences.
NEWS
October 23, 1998 | By Candace Heckman and Maureen Graham, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Commotion over mercury found recently in private South Jersey water wells sparked fury this week among local officials who were told that the state may cut funds for a federal project aimed at finding sources of the water contamination. But officials from the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection said yesterday they are committed to providing money to fund the project. Members of the Tri-County Water Quality Management Board, which oversees water quality in Burlington, Camden and Gloucester Counties, adopted a resolution Wednesday notifying the DEP of the board's concern with decisions that could cancel state funding for the mercury tests, said Mike Ontko, the board's coordinator.
NEWS
March 16, 1989 | By Lisa Scheid, Special to The Inquirer
The Octorara school board on Monday night accepted bids to create a "mini- water-treatment plant" at Octorara's 53-acre campus that would tie the schools' water wells into a single water-purification system. The system would replace water pumps and piping of the district's three wells and add a 100,000-gallon holding tank, said Superintendent Richard P. McAdams. Some of the piping is more than 30 years old, he said. The plant would add a mechanical filtration process to the current chemical purification system, said McAdams.
NEWS
June 13, 2000 | By Zlati Meyer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Verna Fluck, 68, of Bedminster, wasn't a very good hostess. Two dozen people were gathered on her back patio yesterday, and she couldn't even serve them glasses of cold water to cool off from the day's mugginess - because her water well is contaminated with the gasoline additive methyl tertiary butyl ether, or MTBE. The neighbors, politicians and reporters gathered for a news conference by U.S. Rep. James C. Greenwood (R., Pa.) had to do without. Greenwood visited the Flucks to announce he will introduce legislation Friday giving the Environmental Protection Agency the authority to control or further limit MTBE, a chemical added to oxygenate gas to reduce carbon-monoxide emissions and damage to the ozone.
NEWS
October 1, 2010 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than the drinking water has become poisonous in Susquehanna County. In a sharp rebuke of one of the state's biggest Marcellus Shale gas drillers, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection on Thursday ordered an $11.8 million pipeline built to deliver water to 18 rural residences in Dimock Township whose household wells are contaminated by natural gas. In response, Cabot Oil & Gas Corp., the Texas driller whose wells the state blames for the pollution, denounced the decision as "unfounded, irrational, and capricious" and accused DEP Secretary John Hanger of "obvious political pandering.
NEWS
June 3, 2000 | by Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this story
A new, cleaner gasoline will be cleaning a little more money out of your pockets. Starting this month, motorists in the Philadelphia area and elsewhere across the country will have to start using a new reformulated, or "green" gasoline, designed to cut down on air pollution. But the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has ordered conversion to the new air-friendly gasoline at a time when consumers are already choking at the gas pump - not from the fumes, but from the prices.
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