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NEWS
June 26, 1988 | By Jane G. Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
As the hot weather settles in, let's talk about watering. The clear liquid that flows so easily from our taps is a precious gift and it's our responsibility to make sure we use it wisely. To ensure that every drop that leaves the tap makes it to the plants, replace broken washers and leaky faucets. When you water, do it thoroughly, soaking the plants so the water goes deep into the soil. If you water superficially, you encourage plants to send out surface roots, making it even harder for them to tolerate a drought.
FOOD
July 1, 1987 | By LIBBY GOLDSTEIN, Special to the Daily News
If you've managed to squeeze a long weekend out of this holiday, do try to spend some of itdrought-proofing your garden. Spring seemed to bring plenty of rain, but we've had the rain shorts since April. The moisture that was in the soil is beginning to get used up. Unless, of course, you managed to put down 4-6 inches of organic mulch, or black plastic, or an inch or two of newspaper where the soil was still lovely and damp. This year I decided to try one of the new weed-stopping fabrics in my plot at Southwark/Queen Village Garden.
NEWS
June 6, 1998 | by Ramona Smith and Rob Laymon, For the Daily News
They call it "Cool Cape May. " And this weekend, it'll live up to its name. The Jersey shore's escape spots - like Philadelphia itself - are having a spell of blanket weather. And we don't mean beach blankets. With daytime temperatures running about 8 degrees cooler than usual for this time of year, it's time to break out the sweatshirts for mornings and evenings. "It's probably not a good weekend for swimming," Accu-Weather meteorologist Mark Tobin said yesterday, with the ocean temperature hovering around 52. The weekend will be ideal for a walk on the beach or boardwalk, though - mostly sunny, with highs around 72. There's a chance of a thunderstorm tomorrow afternoon.
NEWS
May 9, 1993 | For The Inquirer / BEVERLY SCHAEFER
Millions of gallons of water drawn from the Brandywine Creek are treated each day at the West Chester Area Municipal Authority's Ingrams Mill plant. For the fifth year, the authority opened the doors of the works for public tours in honor of National Drinking Water Week.
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
THE $18 MILLION Schuylkill Banks Boardwalk opens today, so Philadelphians and their leashed dogs can "walk on water" from Locust Street to the South Street Bridge. Bike on water, too. Built out into the river parallel to the east bank, the 2,000-foot boardwalk experience is a heady mix of ducks and trucks, trees and breeze, cityscape and landscape, roadway and waterway, industrial and pastoral, trains and turtles, big sky and big city. Strolling along the city's newest people magnet yesterday, Joseph Syrnick, president/CEO of the Schuylkill River Development Corporation, who has spent eight years guiding the project from drawing board to boardwalk, talked about the romance of the river.
NEWS
July 11, 2008 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Unlike most people, gardeners love rain. It's no spoiler - just the opposite. Rain is life-giving. It's also welcome relief from a chore most of us dislike only slightly less than weeding: Hose-dragging is truly a drag. There are other reasons Jeff Player, Jackie Umphlet and Rachelle Aquilla try to conserve water in their gardens, in such diverse locales as South Jersey, central Montgomery County, and Philadelphia: They want to save money, and the planet. But saving water rarely hits the popular radar without a dry spell or drought.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1992 | By Anita Myette, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of the world's most unusual theater companies will debut in Philadelphia - in America, for that matter - on May 6, in a production that the whole family can enjoy. The Water Puppets of Vietnam, a folk-theater form dating from the 10th century, features handcrafted puppets that dance in a pool of water on stage, manipulated by rods hidden under the water. Drumbeats and music accompany the puppets as tales from mythology and village life unfold. The puppet show is the final production in Movement Theatre International's 1991-92 season.
SPORTS
September 19, 2005 | By Tim Panaccio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jon Sim is no stranger to water. He grew up in the industrial town of New Glasgow, Nova Scotia. Sim loves the water. Fishing, boating and now rowing. Well, maybe not so much rowing. Yesterday, as part of their annual "team building" exercise, the Flyers hit Boathouse Row and cruised the Schuylkill. "I enjoyed being on the water," Sim said. "I live all around water back home. Whenever you get on the water, it's fun. But it was a little more work than I thought. I've done dragon boat races, but not an eight-man boat.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2013 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
Last weekend's Invisible River - an aerial dance/music project to be staged under and around the Strawberry Mansion Bridge by Alie Vidich & the Brigade - nearly became Invisible Dance . Though Vidich and her team had worked for eight months to secure permits through the Fairmount Park Special Events Office, the bridges division of the City Streets Department, and the state Fish and Boat Commission, no one told them they also needed to notify...
LIVING
August 30, 1987 | By Gary Haynes, Inquirer Graphic Arts Director
When traveling with a camera in the summer, it is important to protect it and the film from extreme temperatures and dampness. Heat is a major threat to film and equipment. Cameras should not be left inside cars parked in direct sunlight, especially not in glove compartments or auto trunks, where temperatures can reach 150 degrees. Even outdoors, leaving a camera in direct sunlight can raise its temperature to 110 degrees or more. When cameras get that hot, the lubricants can become so thin that they can run and gum up parts that aren't supposed to be lubricated.
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