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Water

NEWS
August 14, 1999
Flush every other time - saves a great deal of water. John Stager Havertown Have suggestions on how to save water? Call 215-854-5060, and we'll print the best ones.
NEWS
August 29, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new drinking-water test requirement has led authorities in Warminster and Horsham to close four major wells and could further delay the redevelopment of the former Naval Air Station Willow Grove. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was commonly used in firefighting foams at Willow Grove and the former Naval Air Warfare Center in Warminster. Both bases have been closed for years, and PFOS has not been manufactured in the United States for about a decade. But the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency did not begin requiring local agencies to test drinking water for those compounds until this year.
NEWS
September 22, 2012 | Breaking News Desk
A water main break has forced the closure of all but one lane of southbound Roosevelt Boulevard in the Rhawnhurst section of Northeast Philadelphia. The incident was already having a significant impact on traffic as of early this morning.
NEWS
August 18, 2012 | Breaking News Desk
The Fire Department has responded to a water main break in the 1800 block of North 4th Street in North Philadelphia. The extent of any flooding is not clear yet, but the street is closed in the area of the break. The 1800 block is between Cecil B. Moore Avenue and West Berks Street.
NEWS
July 18, 2013 | By Marcia Dunn, Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In one of the most harrowing spacewalks in decades, an astronaut had to rush back into the International Space Station on Tuesday after a mysterious water leak inside his helmet robbed him of the ability to speak or hear and could have caused him to choke or even drown. Italian Luca Parmitano was reported to be fine after the dangerous episode, which might have been caused by a leak in the cooling system of his suit. His spacewalking partner, American Christopher Cassidy, had to help him inside after NASA quickly aborted the spacewalk.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia City Council will not take up a proposal to create a new water and sewer rate-making body until after the council's summer recess ends in September. City Council President Darrell L. Clarke on Wednesday delayed a vote on creating the board, which city voters authorized last November. The bill would create a new independent board of five mayoral appointees that could approve rates, which are now determined by the water commissioner. Council's Committee on Law and Government approved on the bill on June 11.
NEWS
February 11, 1989 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. and Mark Wagenveld, Inquirer Staff Writers
The hot-water faucet in the bathroom where two children died after being scalded Thursday was putting out water with a temperature approaching the boiling point, homicide detectives said yesterday. Detectives said they recorded the water temperature at 192 degrees Fahrenheit, far in excess of temperatures normal for household use. The boiling point is 212 degrees. The test led investigators to conlude that Troy L. Ayers, 3 1/2, and his half-brother, Kevin S. Wilson, 2 years and 2 months, were burned by the water after being overcome by heat and steam as their parents slept in another room in their apartment at the Queen Lane public housing project in Germantown.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
In Water, Michael Caine is the governor of the tiny British colony of Cascara and - like all mad dogs and Englishmen - strides into the midday sun. He sports one of those silly feathered hats and says he feels as if he's wearing a chicken on his head. The film itself is a dead duck. Although Dick Clement's comedy boasts some topical material - a mandatory "Shall we wake the President?" gibe and a well-taken swing at the French attitude toward those who object to their nuclear tests - Water is really an invitation to step into a time machine.
NEWS
June 24, 1989 | By Lacy McCrary, Inquirer Staff Writer
When John Boyle stepped outside his house Thursday afternoon in Holland, Bucks County, he saw what "looked like a river" of rainwater flowing into his yard and into the yard next door. He began worrying because he knew that his neighbor Linda J. Sanford, 22, who suffered from cerebral palsy, was inside her family's home, in the first block of Heron Drive. But, he said yesterday, there was nothing he could do to help her because the water might have swept him away. Police, alerted by another neighbor, found Sanford's body floating in more than two feet of muddy water in the family room of the home.
NEWS
January 30, 2008 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A husband and wife awake each morning without a trace of memory about their identities or the home they've slept in, together. So every morning, in Lee Blessing's oddly disorienting play A Body of Water, they must begin a process of discovering who they are - and no matter what they believe about themselves by day's end, it will all be lost again by next morning. The scenario's a little far-fetched. Blessing (A Walk in the Woods) sees his play, currently on the stage of Act II Playhouse in Ambler, as meaning something more than its surface plot: He has written that it's a metaphor for a world in which our identities are not fully under our control.
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