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NEWS
June 11, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Several drivers got stuck in a swift, heavy downpour that flooded streets and closed two heavily used Norristown bridges Monday evening. Around 5, the Dannehower Bridge and the DeKalb Street Bridge were flooded. Those bridges carry major commuter traffic over the Schuylkill between Norristown and King of Prussia, Bridgeport, and other areas in western Montgomery County. The Norristown Fire Department performed "multiple water rescues," according to its Facebook page, and a Montgomery County emergency dispatcher said it sent assistance for at least three disabled vehicles.
NEWS
June 8, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly two years after Barbara Failer's basement was flooded with water three feet deep from a broken city main, she is still emotional about her losses. "I had kept one trunk with memorabilia, childhood toys, letters from my grandmother. . . . They all drowned," Failer said Friday, her voice breaking. She was one of several people who testified Friday at a special City Council committee hearing. It was held to consider ways of compensating residents and businesses in Southwest Center City who were hit hard when a 48-inch water main broke July 22, 2012, at 22d and Bainbridge Streets.
NEWS
June 7, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Make room, violet and honeybee. Share the stage, goldfinch. New Jersey may soon have a new state symbol, and how sweet it is. The Assembly's Tourism, Gaming, and the Arts Committee released a bill Thursday that would make salt water taffy the official state candy. Making a persuasive case for honoring the Shore staple were fifth graders from Samsel Upper Elementary School in Sayreville, a community greatly damaged by Hurricane Sandy, who made the trip Thursday to Trenton. They proposed the state sweet to Assemblyman John S. Wisniewski (D., Middlesex)
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Officials lifted the boil-water advisory for six Montgomery County municipalities Friday after a second round of tests revealed no sign of contaminants. "We're very pleased," said Terry Maenza, a spokesman for the Pennsylvania American Water Co. As a precaution, the company had advised about 18,000 customers since Tuesday to boil any water before drinking it or using it to wash dishes. That came after the company experienced a loss in positive water pressure in the distribution system at its Norristown plant, which increased the risk of contamination.
NEWS
May 24, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
As thousands of Montgomery County residents and businesses endured a third day without drinking water, a Montgomery County legislator called Thursday for a state hearing to determine how water from a local treatment plant was under risk of becoming contaminated. State Rep. Mike Vereb (R., Montgomery) said officials from the Pennsylvania American Water company need to explain why parts of the system in its Norristown plant ran dry on Tuesday, leading the company to issue a boil-water advisory to 18,000 customers in six municipalities.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania American Water says a boil-water advisory for 18,000 customers in six Montgomery County towns will remain in effect through Friday. The utility said water pressure had been restored to the distribution system served by its Norristown plant, which draws water from the Schuylkill. But it needs clean-water tests for two days before it can lift the advisory, according to Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection guidelines. "All signs are looking positive," Pennsylvania American spokesman Terry M. Maenza said Wednesday.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania American Water instructed 18,000 customers in six Montgomery County towns Tuesday night to boil water for human consumption after water supplies ran low because of problems at its Norristown treatment plant. Customers in East Norriton, West Norriton, Lower Providence, Whitpain, Worcester, and Whitemarsh Townships were told to boil water as a precaution after some parts of the utility's system ran dry. When water systems lose pressure, bacteria can enter. Boiling the water destroys the pathogens.
NEWS
May 19, 2014 | By Rick O'Brien and Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Stotesbury cup Regatta, the largest high school rowing event, canceled all semifinal races Saturday, with finals scheduled to begin at 2 p.m. with the boys' freshman eight. Organizers made the decision to cancel the seminfinal events early Saturday morning, after Friday's rainfall led to potentially dangerous rowing conditions on the Schuylkill River. At 11 a.m., they announced their decision to continue with the finals races only. Friday's storm led to high water levels, increased speed, and debris in the water.
REAL_ESTATE
May 19, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
A few weeks back, a reader asked for reasons why a wood floor was starting to extrude chips and slivers from between the boards. Doug Sandilands, of Shamrock Flooring in Aston, says it's his guess that the chips and slivers coming out of the floors are from an older type of waxed prefinished floors the industry called Kromar. "These boards are 5/16 inches thick by two inches wide," Sandilands said. "However, the depth from the face of the board to the tongue and groove is only about 1/16 of an inch.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
In late April, business partners Tommy Up and Sarah Brown put out an offer: Pitch in to help them open a tiki bar called the Yachtsman in Fishtown, and reap rewards ranging from a private party to your name engraved on a bar stool (plus the right to evict other patrons from said stool). Brown and Up - who is also the owner of PYT, a Northern Liberties eatery that is in the process of franchising its format of wacky burgers and boozy milkshakes - said construction overruns had cleaned them out. So, rather than seek a loan or bring in a partner, they decided to cash in their social capital via Kickstarter, an online crowdfunding platform through which anyone can donate, and funds are collected only if the target goal is reached.
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