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NEWS
March 10, 2016 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - On again, off again, on again, kind of like a faucet. That would be an apt way to describe Atlantic City's actions to protect its water utility from takeover by either a corporate water company or the county's utility authority. On Tuesday, City Council President Marty Small once again embraced the strategy of making the Municipal Utility Authority (MUA) a city department - an action supported by both the state-appointed emergency manager and Mayor Don Guardian, but at which council has balked twice in recent months.
REAL_ESTATE
March 6, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
If I made water softeners for a living, I'd sure as shooting be interested in consumer attitudes about hard water. Wouldn't you? That's a rhetorical question. No replies are necessary. It should come as no surprise, then, that Morton Salt, which makes water-softening products, found in a survey that 85 percent of American homes have hard water, though many homeowners might not know it, and even more don't know how to fix it. More than 90 percent of 500 Americans surveyed deal with soap scum or water stains caused by hard water, Morton said.
NEWS
March 5, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
SCRANTON - Erik Roos waited more than six years to tell a jury his story about shale-gas drilling and water contamination in rural Dimock Township. When he finally got a chance to testify this week, he was done in about a half-hour. Roos was one of 44 Dimock residents who sued Cabot Oil & Gas Co. in federal court in 2009, alleging that the company's Marcellus Shale drilling had polluted their water wells. Roos and most of the plaintiffs settled in 2012, to his enduring dissatisfaction.
NEWS
March 5, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
Is toxic water in the vicinity of the former Naval Air Station Willow Grove and the Naval Air Warfare Center in Warminster making people sick? That's the concern three area congressmen raised Thursday in a letter to the Navy demanding answers about the government's knowledge of the water issues. "Residents who consumed the contaminated water have understandable concern that these chemicals, which studies show can cause serious illness, are the cause of their own health conditions," wrote U.S. Reps.
NEWS
March 2, 2016
The public will have three chances this week to give feedback and get information on water-rate increases proposed by the Philadelphia Water Department. Under the proposal, a typical residential customer's monthly water bill would increase by $4.20, or 6.2 percent, on July 1; and another $3.90, or 5.5 percent, on July 1, 2017. By then, the typical residential bill would have gone from $67.40 to $75.50. By July 2017, senior citizens would have seen their monthly bills go from $50.50 to $56.60 The rate increases are needed for, among other expenses, to repair and replace the city's 6,000-plus miles of aging water and sewer pipes, and to comply with regularity requirements, water officials said.
BUSINESS
February 29, 2016
Take a trip to Japan and you're floored by the health-minded fastidiousness of the culture. Cab drivers wear white gloves, place lace doilies on the backseat head rests. Courteous cold sufferers hide behind a gauze mask to contain their germs. Hotel guests find slippers at their door (so please remove your dirty shoes). And most fascinating, when venturing into a hotel or even a public bathroom, visitors are greeted by an auto-washing toilet seat, most often bearing the Toto brand name Washlet, inviting you to enjoy a hands-free, paper-free, hyper-cleansing potty visit that's weird and wonderful at the same time.
NEWS
February 24, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
As the Philadelphia Water Department seeks to raise rates by 12 percent over the next two years, the city will hold a series of hearings starting this week to get feedback from customers. The rate increase, which must be approved by the water rate board, would be phased in starting July 1, with another bump on July 1, 2017. Over the two years, the average residential bill would go up by about $8 per month. Water Department Commissioner Debra McCarty called the increase a "responsible request," saying additional revenue is needed to repair and replace aging infrastructure and comply with regulatory mandates, among other factors.
NEWS
February 22, 2016 | By Sam Wood and Wendy Ruderman, STAFF WRITERS
Philadelphia Water Department officials went on the defensive Friday in the wake of a report that raised questions about the small percentage of city homes tested for lead and the collection methods used to sample drinking water. There are roughly 50,000 homes in Philadelphia with lead service pipes connected to water mains. And yet, the Water Department tested tap water for lead in only 134 homes, according to a 2014 state-mandated summary report of sampling and testing compliance.
REAL_ESTATE
February 21, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
I spent $88 to come up with this information - my quarterly bill for regional sewer service contained a brochure that got me thinking. The expense was well-worth advice on this topic: water-saving tips for a family of four. Updating your shower with a low-flow showerhead can save 7,665 gallons of water and up to $50 a year. Cutting the time you spend in the shower to five minutes can save 76,650 gallons of water and up to $498 a year. Replacing that old water-guzzling toilet with a WaterSense low-flow version can save 10,986 gallons of water and up to $70 a year.
NEWS
February 21, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
Amid increased concern from residents about a chemical contaminant found in their drinking water, Moorestown on Friday shut down one of its water supply wells. Mayor Phil Garwood announced the immediate shutdown of Well 7 at the North Church Street treatment plant in a letter to residents. "The bottom line is that our water supply is safe, but our water infrastructure is aging and in need of repairs and upgrades to ensure the highest quality water in Moorestown for generations to come," Garwood wrote.
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