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NEWS
March 23, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
HORRIFIC SCENES from a killer drought in the African valley where he was raised inspired Elijah Korich to become a champion for life. Korich, 64, is the founder and quiet force of nature behind Keiyo Soy Ministries, a faith-based organization that pulls resources from congregations in and around the city in support of its guiding principle: To improve the quality of life in western Kenya, especially through clean water. This morning, Korich will hold his Walk for Water, a 5K race on the Schuylkill River Trail, now in its sixth year, which serves as the annual linchpin in his fundraising efforts.
NEWS
March 21, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Janice Lear's eighth-grade students listened recently as the geography teacher read a book that opened their eyes to the challenges children around the world face just to get clean water. "The kids were so moved by it," Lear said. "I remember them saying, 'Ms. Lear, this is not OK. What can we do?' " To that end, eighth graders at Charles F. Patton Middle School in Kennett Square, Chester County, have raised more than $4,800 so far to build a well for a school in Uganda and a water-filtration system and hand-washing station for a school in the Dominican Republic.
SPORTS
March 20, 2015
BELLE GLADE, Fla. - They call it "The Muck. " Life at the bottom layer of the world's most powerful economy necessitates the acceptance of a certain degree of irony. You feel you cannot beat it, and so you join it, you embrace it, you claim it as your own. In this small, impoverished region on the south shore of Lake Okeechobee, the muck is something more than the damp, mineral-rich soil in which you attempt to cultivate a life. It is life. It is where you are from. The cemetery sits on the edge of a sugar-cane field where dirt rises in clouds above the beds of F-150s and green stalks tremble beneath the bellies of yellow crop-dusters.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Imagine if a group of antiwar Democratic senators had penned a letter to Saddam Hussein in 2003 saying, "Don't worry about President Bush's war threats. We will undercut him. " "Treachery!" Republicans would have roared. Yet 47 Republican senators, including Pennsylvania's Pat Toomey, have written an open letter to Iran's clerics saying Congress or the next president will probably rescind any deal signed by President Obama without congressional approval. This effort to scuttle talks on curbing Iran's nuclear program is an extraordinary breach of tradition, providing the world with further evidence that the U.S. government is dysfunctional.
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Navy could be paying upwards of $12 million to filter contaminated drinking water around former military bases in Montgomery and Bucks Counties. Elevated levels of perflourinated compounds, which have been linked to cancer and reproductive issues, were found last year in several drinking water wells in Horsham, Warrington, and Warminster. At an open house in Horsham Wednesday, local officials, and Navy and Environmental Protection Agency representatives said they are making progress on fixing the problem.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Water ice isn't just a summer thing: "We do more sales in January than July," says Richard Trotter , owner of Rosati Italian Water Ice and its brick mixing-and- packaging plant at South Glenwood and East Madison Streets in Clifton Heights. Rosati sold 22 million water ice cups to schools from here to California, plus 100,000 two-quart "buckets" at groceries like Acme in 2014. Unlike the popular scooped ice sold from summer stands and trucks, which sits well in a chiller for a day but tends to harden rocklike in a dairy freezer, this packaged ice is mixed and sweetened to keep cold for about 18 months, so it can be stored with ice cream.
NEWS
February 9, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
AS SOON AS the new, million-dollar Poquessing Creek Trail opened in the Far Northeast this winter, Jack McCarthy was out hiking it with his granddaughter, Gia McCusker, 8. "The trail is a bucolic, serene place to go from Parkwood, where I live," McCarthy said. "Parkwood is all rowhouses," he said. "I can walk five minutes and be on this trail that leads through this nice woods and along this beautiful stream. "And it connects to Benjamin Rush State Park's trails," McCarthy said, "so you can basically walk or bike from Parkwood all the way to the state park.
NEWS
January 30, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
WHAT POWERFUL force sent bricks raining down on a Center City athletic-apparel store and its shoppers Tuesday? Water. Well, frozen water, to be specific. A preliminary investigation by the city's Department of Licenses and Inspections revealed that "water infiltration, along with freezing and thawing" were likely responsible for the destruction of a parapet wall that caused a partial roof collapse at the Lululemon Athletica store on Walnut Street near 15th, L&I Commissioner Carlton Williams said.
NEWS
January 6, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Paulsboro reached a settlement in December with the plastics company it had sued nearly a year before over a contaminated water well, it marked a win for a scrappy industrial town familiar with environmental woes. The agreement, valued at more than $2 million, stipulates that Solvay Specialty Polymers will install a sophisticated filtration system on the contaminated well. Although the settlement signaled a hopeful end to Paulsboro's most recent health scare, it also raised questions about how several neighboring towns in Gloucester County would address the issue.
NEWS
December 27, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
After almost three months of delays, the water park at Camden's Kroc Center is expected to be fully operational Friday, in time for local kids' winter school vacations. The Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Center, a $90 million building on Harrison Avenue that is run by the Salvation Army, opened in early October with much fanfare after nine years of planning. But until this week, bureaucratic holdups had prevented the center from using the 11,000-square-foot indoor water park's splash buckets, fountains, water slide, and other features.
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