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NEWS
August 29, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new drinking-water test requirement has led authorities in Warminster and Horsham to close four major wells and could further delay the redevelopment of the former Naval Air Station Willow Grove. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was commonly used in firefighting foams at Willow Grove and the former Naval Air Warfare Center in Warminster. Both bases have been closed for years, and PFOS has not been manufactured in the United States for about a decade. But the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency did not begin requiring local agencies to test drinking water for those compounds until this year.
NEWS
August 22, 2014
The deal: John Cardullo got in on the South Philly act of turning fruit, sugar and water into dessert in 1945. He ran his business from a boxy brick building built for that very purpose. John's is still there, under the direction of Anthony Cardullo Jr., John's grandson. There's another John's in Pennsauken, run by Anthony Jr.'s cousin, and a third that recently opened on the Boardwalk in Atlantic City.   Where: 701 Christian St., 215-925-6955, johnswaterice.com.   Hours: 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Monday-Saturday, 1-10 p.m. Sunday.
NEWS
August 21, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
      Upper Darby Township police will be treating about 1,000 township residents to water ice and a movie on Tuesday night. "We've decided to do something positive for the community," said Michael J. Chitwood, Superintendent of Police. The event will be held at the Second Ward Playground, at Crosley Avenue and Seaford Road, from 7:30 to 10 p.m., said Chitwood. The Lego Movie will be shown starting at 8:15 p.m., he said. On Monday, as 25 members of the township's ground crew were mowing the lawn at the playground and washing out the bathrooms, police were busy handing out about 800 flyers to residents.
NEWS
August 19, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
DOUGLASSVILLE, Pa. - Gov. Corbett pushed off into the Schuylkill from a boat ramp in southern Berks County early Sunday morning on Day Two of his annual kayaking tour of Pennsylvania waterways. The events are publicly billed as a way to promote tourism and the outdoors, but they also provide a quiet respite and few hours of haven for the usually media-shy chief executive. This year was no different, except that - given his standing in the polls - it might be the last kayak trip Corbett leads as governor.
NEWS
August 19, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Days since last rainfall?" "Well, yesterday we got a little bit. " "Water clarity?" "Looks pretty clear to me. " "All righty. Stream bed color?" "Brown," Doug McClure pauses, staring at the mud, "with green highlights. " "Odor?" Wendy McClure doesn't wait for her husband's answer. She spreads her arms wide and raises her nose to the sky: "Doesn't smell like much of anything. Just a creek. " The North Wales couple were on their first official field survey Wednesday as "Creek Watchers" - a group of 60 amateur scientists collecting water-quality data for the Wissahickon Valley Watershed Association.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
When you hear the phrase drought gardening - or waterwise, low-water or xeriscape gardening - what comes to mind? Cacti and rocks, probably, which is great for the Mojave Desert look. But how about these beauties to do the job: The fragrant and feathery agastache, beloved by bees and butterflies, in colors that channel a Santa Fe sunset. Or wild quinine, whose ultracool flowers - tiny, dense, cauliflowerlike - bloom their heads off from June to October. Or the lovable Mediterranean "moon carrot," with its fernlike silvery-blue foliage and splayed clusters of white, buttony blossoms.
NEWS
August 14, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
You couldn't drink it. You couldn't bathe in it. You couldn't wash dishes in it. A bloom of toxin-producing, blue-green algae in Lake Erie had rendered the water unsafe and forced Toledo, Ohio, to shut down its system for several days. Could it happen here? Exceedingly unlikely, Philadelphia-area water officials say. They do see the same algae in local waters, but the difference is, it doesn't grow out of control here or, for reasons unknown, produce the same toxins. But officials here have plenty of other types of algae to contend with, albeit mostly ones that affect taste and odor and clog filters, rather than harm people.
TRAVEL
July 27, 2014 | By Renee Langmuir, For The Inquirer
After the unexpected death of a close family member, an uncomplicated, therapeutic vacation was in order. Knowing my husband was a fan of hot springs for their healing qualities, I proposed several locations: California, Colorado, Arkansas, North Carolina, and Berkeley Springs, W.Va. The last was selected because of its easy three-hour drive west down the Pennsylvania Turnpike and I-81. Our must-haves included: natural beauty, the waters, and a significant divergence from our daily lifestyle.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
The white, office-style water dispenser in the corner of the kitchen says quite a bit about the unwanted lifestyle changes underway in the Minix household in West Deptford. Jeannie Minix, 55 and a vegetarian, will not be eating the tomatoes, eggplant, and other organic produce she nurtures in her backyard garden. Her daughters Chelsea, 24, and Haley, 21, keep reminding themselves not to use ice cubes from the freezer or to run their toothbrushes under the faucet. Otherwise unthinking actions are now tainted by fear of an emerging, unregulated contaminant found in the family's water this month.
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