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NEWS
October 22, 2013 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The event was advertised as Burlington County's Fall Foliage Family Float, with plenty of opportunities for people of all ages to board watercraft bobbing on creek and lake in Mount Holly. But for some, staying afloat wasn't so easy. Ask Greyson Curran. As he and his family completed their first four-mile canoe trip and prepared to try the harder course, Greyson, 12, announced his favorite part of the journey: "Seeing the lady fall overboard!" Despite a few spills, most participants in the annual event at Historic Smithville Park did indeed stay dry, from grandparents who ended their two-hour trips grinning but groaning from the hard work of rowing, to toddlers who toted balloon animals and sippy cups on board.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Wave directors such as Jean-Luc Godard and François Truffaut famously incorporated tropes from American noir and Western films into theirs. Their colleague Louis Malle went a step further and made a score of American films, including My Dinner With Andre (1981)   , Vanya on 42nd Street (1994) - and the 1981 masterpiece Atlantic City featuring Burt Lancaster and Susan Sarandon. Malle's work was well-received - even revered - here with the possible exception of 1985's Alamo Bay , which sharply divided critics.
NEWS
September 25, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WOMEN DIDN'T wear lipstick at the Academy of Natural Sciences in the '30s. In fact, women were scarce in the scientific world in those days, and not really accepted by male-dominated institutions, such as the venerable academy. Maybe as a way to deny that women were even capable of looking into a microscope, displays of feminity in any form were frowned on. However, Ruth Myrtle Patrick soon proved that women were not only the equal of men in science, but, in many cases - hers included - could surpass male accomplishments in many realms and pave their own way to important discoveries.
NEWS
September 13, 2013 | By Megan Lydon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Parts of the historic Fountain of the Seahorses behind the Philadelphia Museum of Art were stained with black streaks, the once-magnificent beasts had tails missing, and no water had come out of their mouths since 2006. On Wednesday, after many years of wear and tear, the fountain was returned to its former glory. After a ceremony attended by Councilman William K. Greenlee, Parks and Recreation and Water Department officials, contractors, and Margot Berg, director of the city's Public Art Program, the water flowed on cue, shooting 16 feet into the air to the acclamation of the dozens in the audience.
NEWS
September 9, 2013 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony McCarley felt the need to cross the English Channel before he even learned to swim. He doesn't know why or how the dream was born, but suddenly he was 49, living in Berwyn, and decided his chance was slipping away. So in 2009, he began hitting the pool at the Upper Main Line YMCA. He worked himself up to 10,000 meters - six miles, three to four hours per swim. He wouldn't drink or eat because he wanted to prepare himself for the body in revolt. He was somewhat mad, admittedly.
BUSINESS
August 31, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania American Water on Thursday acquired three small water and wastewater systems that serve about 2,100 people, including the mandated takeover of a troubled Pike County sewage company. The company paid $6.9 million for the acquisitions. Pennsylvania American acquired the Clean Treatment Sewage Company in Delaware Township, Pike County, which has been subject to an eight-year moratorium on new connections because of operational problems. The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission in 2012 ordered Pennsylvania American to take over the system and upgrade its operations.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
PSEG's Salem nuclear plant in southern New Jersey returned to full power on Sunday after a leaking valve that forced the plant to shut down Thursday was repaired. The plant's owner said that workers replaced the packing material in the pressurizer spray valve used in the reactor coolant system, which had failed and caused a water leak that was confined to the Unit 1 containment building. No other problems were found in similar valves at the plant, said Joe Delmar, a PSEG spokesman.
NEWS
August 24, 2013 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
OCEAN CITY, N.J. - The beach on Thursday was covered in visitors who would likely go home, flush the toilet, take a shower, dry off with a laundered towel, and maybe have a nice glass of . . . something. Probably none of them considered exactly where the water that would allow them to do all of those things - including making an iced tea - came from. Except, perhaps, for those beachgoers at the Seventh Street beach who stopped to look at a quirky sand sculpture by the artist John Gruber, commissioned by New Jersey American Water.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ten environmental organizations have asked a federal court to halt construction of the controversial Susquehanna-Roseland power line project through the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, scheduled to begin Sept. 3. Public Service Electric & Gas Co. and PPL Electric Utilities are upgrading an existing 145-mile transmission line that crosses from Pennsylvania to New Jersey, including four miles of the national recreation area. The upgrade includes replacing a 230,000-volt power line with taller towers that will carry 500,000-volt lines.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2013 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
We pay our water and sewer bills, usually without fail. We would cancel cable TV before not paying those necessary utilities. Otherwise, no one's happy in the house, right? That's exactly why some cities in Pennsylvania are circling back to municipal bonds backed by water and sewer, and why they may offer a more secure payout if the cities run into financial trouble, says muni bond expert Alan Schankel at Janney Montgomery Scott in Philadelphia. Stressed municipalities are getting creative, ginning up revenue on which to refinance outstanding debt.
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