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NEWS
August 26, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
PMC Property Group plans to add ground-floor retail to its One Water Street residential project near the Benjamin Franklin Bridge amid increasing pedestrian traffic along the Delaware River waterfront, the company said. "The sense is that there is considerable activity there, and we are going to try to accommodate some retail," PMC executive vice president Jonathan Stavin said in an interview. The 250-unit project - consisting of separate 13- and 16-story sections - is being constructed at 230 N. Columbus Blvd., near the recently landscaped Race Street Pier and the historic building that now houses the FringeArts theater and restaurant complex.
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
The push to supply clean water to those affected by contamination spanning several Gloucester County towns is set to progress in West Deptford, where officials voted Wednesday night to move to connect certain properties with private wells to public water. The town, under an agreement with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection outlined at a township committee meeting, plans to install a new water-main extension to provide municipal water to three houses on Clement Drive, where high levels of the contaminant, perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA)
NEWS
August 9, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
You've arrived. You've gone to the beach. You've pondered the majesty of the ocean. And now, you just want to get out there. But you don't have a boat. How can you find yourself upon the high seas or the back bays? Where can you go to embark on a relaxing evening cruise or a big day of fishing? Or just have a little paddle around to look at the flora and fauna of the Jersey Shore? Surprisingly, there are a lot of options up and down the coast that don't require a huge investment in time or money.
REAL_ESTATE
August 9, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
How many of you rinse off dishes first before putting them in the dishwasher? Since, to get out of cooking, I take care of cleaning up and that involves loading the dishwasher, I am a rinser. When I don't do it, any stray fleck of cheese is melted on the surface of the plates, requiring additional surface blasting to get the dishes clean. If you listen to the Home Appliance Manufacturers Association, the latest Department of Energy regulations to reduce dishwashers' water and energy consumption will have you washing dishes by hand to get them clean.
NEWS
August 9, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
For all the excitement over high-tech drugs and surgical procedures, clean drinking water is one of the top life-saving health advances of the modern age. Yet billions do not have access to it. According to a June report by the World Health Organization, at least 1.8 billion people still drink water contaminated with feces. Philadelphia was one of the first cities in the U.S. to have a public drinking water supply provided by the government. It was begun in 1801 after a series of yellow fever epidemics killed thousands of people.
NEWS
August 6, 2015 | By Madeline R. Conway, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia City Controller Alan Butkovitz is calling on the Water Revenue Bureau to increase oversight of its process for adjusting bills, arguing that its system invites abuse by employees. Bureau employees made $110 million worth of adjustments to water bills in the 2014 fiscal year without authorization from a supervisor, according to a report Butkovitz's office released Tuesday. Those adjustments were not necessarily improper, as some employees are allowed to make some changes, including canceling and refunding, without formal approval from a superior.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
The number of U.S. homes worth less than what is owed on their mortgages dropped in the second quarter, another positive sign that the national housing market is shaking off the effects of the prolonged downturn. RealtyTrac, an Irvine, Calif.-based real estate information company that monitors foreclosures, reported Thursday that the percentage of so-called seriously underwater properties fell to 13.3 percent of all U.S. homes with mortgages in the quarter, or 7.44 million. "Seriously underwater" is defined by RealtyTrac as those houses for which the combined loan amount secured by a property is at least 25 percent higher than the property's estimated market value.
NEWS
July 27, 2015 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
I just got back from a book tour with Daughter Francesca, which was wonderful except for one thing: Bridges. As in, I'm newly scared of driving over them. Please tell me I'm not alone. Our book is titled Does This Beach Make Me Look Fat? , so our publisher scheduled us for a book tour of bookstores in beach resorts, and I'm not complaining. But I knew I was in trouble on day one, as I drove toward Rehoboth, encountering my first bridge. It rose ahead of me like a concrete tsunami, and all of a sudden, I felt weak in the knees.
NEWS
July 26, 2015 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
A manatee may soon join a bevy of sea creatures - sharks, Portuguese men-of-war, whales - that have visited the waters off New Jersey this summer. But beachgoers should not fear the ocean; the water is fine, the shark population is the same as in years past, and the Portuguese men-of-war are dwindling. Several manatees were believed to be between Maryland and Delaware on Friday, and one appeared to be heading north, said Robert Schoelkopf, director of the Marine Mammal Stranding Center in Brigantine.
NEWS
July 26, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than half of the residents of Madagascar have to rely on potentially dangerous drinking-water supplies, and more than 85 percent use sanitation facilities that fail to meet basic hygiene standards. A team of Villanova University students and a professor are spending part of their summer vacation on the island nation, working to improve those conditions. The school has partnered with Catholic Relief Services (CRS) on an initiative that began in the classroom and is continuing with six students and seven faculty members working in the field, said Barbara Wall, vice president for mission and ministry for Villanova.
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