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NEWS
June 11, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
Three city councilwomen introduced a trio of bills to try to protect Philadelphia children from lead exposure, following the water crisis in Flint, Mich., and a lawsuit over how the city handles lead testing. The bills would require city public schools and day-care centers to test water for lead contamination, and landlords to tell renters about any lead pipes that connect buildings to water mains. The legislation comes a week after a proposed class-action suit was filed against the city alleging that the Water Department was aware of high levels of lead in tap water and failed to warn residents.
NEWS
June 10, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal and Justine McDaniel, STAFF WRITERS
Pennsylvania's senators and local members of Congress are pressing the Navy to fund blood testing for residents affected by water contamination around former naval air bases in Bucks and Montgomery Counties. That request Tuesday - prompted by health concerns over chemicals that leaked into water supplies, and are linked to cancer and reproductive issues - came on the same day that the consumer advocate Erin Brockovich and a New York-based law firm announced that they would investigate the drinking-water issues in the area.
NEWS
June 10, 2016 | By Emily Babay, Staff Writer
Water rates in Philadelphia will rise by nearly 10 percent over the next two years, the Water, Sewer and Stormwater Rate Board announced Wednesday. The increase will be phased in starting in July, when the average residential bill will go up by $3.44 per month. Another increase, averaging $3.18 a month, is to begin July 1, 2017. In total, the average monthly residential bill is slated to go from $67.43 to $74.05 over the two years, a 9.8 percent increase. The Water Department had sought a rate increase of about 12 percent over the two years.
NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel, STAFF WRITER
Consumer advocate Erin Brockovich and a New York-based law firm will investigate the drinking water contamination near former naval air bases outside Philadelphia, they said Tuesday. In Bucks and Montgomery Counties, 16 public drinking wells and dozens of private wells have been shut off since 2014 after having been found contaminated with chemicals known as PFOA and PFOS. Although officials say public water is now safe to drink, and private well owners are being moved onto the public supply, residents worry about the years they spent drinking the water - and many say the government and military have failed to give them all the answers they're seeking.
NEWS
June 8, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Funeral services will be held Wednesday, June 8, for Hubert Joseph "Bud" DiGiacomo, 90, a retired Navy Reserve officer and Philadelphia Water Department foreman, who died Saturday, May 28. Mr. DiGiacomo, of Rhawnhurst, died of complications of Alzheimer's disease at St. John Neumann Nursing Home on Roosevelt Boulevard. Born and reared in Kensington, Mr. DiGiacomo attended Ascension of Our Lord grade school and Northeast Catholic High School for Boys. He left high school in September 1943 to join the Navy and fight in World War II. After training at boot camp in Sampson, N.Y., he was deployed to New Orleans in 1944 to serve as a motor machinist's mate aboard the LCT-742 (a landing craft for tanks)
NEWS
June 8, 2016 | Staff Reports
A member of the U.S. House is calling for an investigation of tainted water near former naval air stations, including those in Montgomery and Bucks Counties. U.S. Rep. Brendan Boyle (D., Pa.) on Monday requested a congressional hearing to force testimony from experts on perfluorinated compounds, and from Navy and Environmental Protection Agency officials about contaminated water near former bases. Perfluorinated compounds, which were commonly used in firefighting foams at the air stations at Willow Grove and Warminster, have been linked to cancer and reproductive problems, and were found in drinking water near the bases in 2014.
REAL_ESTATE
June 6, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
I don't water lawns. I consider it a waste of a precious resource, and years of experience have taught me that the grass will come back after a dry or hot spell. I do water our gardens, though, and I've just hooked up a diverter to one of the garage downspouts that is convenient to our raised beds, for both watering by hand and setting up a drip-irrigation system. I attached two rain barrels to the diverter, and they filled up in a few hours on one of May's many rainy days. The diverter I chose closes automatically when the barrels are filled, and whatever rain falls from then on is directed into the splash block and away from the garage's foundation.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2016
Securities trades recently reported to the Securities and Exchange Commission by officers, directors, and principal shareholders of corporations based or having sizable employment in the Philadelphia area. Titles are as reported to the SEC. American Water Works Co. Deborah A. Degillio , officer and treasurer, sold 1,866 shares at $74.29 to $74.31 on May 17, and now directly holds 1,279 shares. Aqua America Inc. David P. Smeltzer , chief financial officer, sold 20,000 shares at $32.55 on May 17, and now directly holds 103,825 shares.
NEWS
May 29, 2016 | By Kim Campbell Thornton, Universal Uclick
WHEN MY DOG Harper was a young puppy, a bee stung her on a hind leg. I didn't know what was causing all the screaming and running in circles until I saw the bee fall to the ground. I called the veterinarian, who recommended a quarter tablet of Benadryl and a cold compress. It was hours before Harper was willing to eat or go outside to potty. It's bee season again. Spring is a busy time for bees, as they have come out of hibernation and are gathering food, pollinating plants in the process.
NEWS
May 26, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel, Staff Writer
Less than a week after new federal guidelines effectively doubled the number of contaminated public water wells near the former naval air bases at Willow Grove and Warminster, residents lined up out the door for an open house with environmental and military officials. "What are they going to do? How bad is it?" asked Sherri Meier, 50, of Warminster, who said she did not want to drink tap water even though the public water supply has been deemed safe. For some among those who packed the room at the Horsham Township Community Center and roamed among the information tables, answers were wanting.
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