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NEWS
February 5, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
PAULSBORO A dozen Paulsboro residents have joined in a lawsuit against a West Deptford plastics company over a contaminated water supply. The lawsuit alleges that Solvay Specialty Polymers has failed to protect the borough from perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) stemming from its operations on Leonard Lane. Filed in Superior Court in Gloucester County on Friday, the suit seeks class-action status and argues that Solvay was negligent. The suit claims bodily injury, emotional distress, and property damage on behalf of the plaintiffs.
NEWS
February 1, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A proposed major water and sewer service rate increase will be the focus of a Haddonfield borough public meeting called for Thursday evening. The actual increase for individual property owners would vary depending on water use, but overall, the borough needs to increase water and sewer revenue by 25 percent, according to a letter to residents. The four-page letter, posted on the borough's website, says the rate hike is needed to make up for a drop in water sales, in part because last year was "exceptionally rainy," and to cover bonds issued to pay for substantial water and sewer infrastructure work over the last several years.
NEWS
January 25, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
PAULSBORO Days after Paulsboro pleaded for state intervention to deal with a contaminated water supply, the state Department of Environmental Protection has advised residents to use bottled water when feeding children up to age 1. Paulsboro officials were expected to post the information to the borough's website Friday, and to issue a letter from the mayor along with the state guidance through the mail. The borough's Well No. 7, a primary water source, has elevated levels of a certain type of perfluorinated compound (PFC)
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA In a sweeping endorsement of Philadelphia's storm water plan, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency awarded $4 million Tuesday to four area colleges to study the plan. Approved 21/2 years ago, the $1.6 billion, 20-year project aims to stem the polluted water gushing from sewer overflows during heavy rains by incorporating "green" projects throughout the city. They range from vegetated roofs and rain gardens that soak up rainwater to porous pavements that let it percolate through.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
All businesses are at the mercy of their supply chain. Few are as vulnerable as a water utility. Witness West Virginia Water, a subsidiary of American Water Works Co. of Voorhees. On Jan. 9, a sweet licorice odor was noticed in the air around the Elk River as it wound its way south through Charleston, the state capital. The source was identified as 7,500 gallons of a chemical known as MCHM that had leaked from a 35,000-gallon tank belonging to Freedom Industries. The spill occurred less than a mile upstream from West Virginia Water's intake facilities.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The natural gas industry wants to use water from abandoned coal mines for hydraulic fracturing operations, replacing fresh water with acid-mine drainage that now poisons thousands of miles of Pennsylvania streams. What's not to like? Plenty, it seems. Environmental activists are mounting a campaign to derail a Pennsylvania Senate bill that would immunize Marcellus Shale gas producers or any other industry that uses acid-mine drainage (AMD) for "beneficial use. " Thirty-five environmental groups signed a letter delivered to senators Thursday that said the proposal known as Senate Bill 411 "would harm streams and communities where the AMD water is being withdrawn" by allowing the transfer of water out of source watersheds.
NEWS
January 18, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
PAULSBORO Officials in Paulsboro may sue a plastics company whose West Deptford facility has been connected to potentially dangerous compounds tainting a water supply. The borough sent a letter to Gov. Christie this week calling for the state's Departments of Environmental Protection and Health to immediately address the contamination issue. Mayor W. Jeffery Hamilton wrote that the borough would file a citizens' suit against Solvay Solexis, but pleaded for state intervention. Solvay management and the DEP have been conducting tests into the levels of PFCs (perfluorochemical compounds)
NEWS
January 15, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
A garbage truck was briefly trapped in 12-foot wide sinkhole that opened up on a South Philadelphia street Monday morning after a water main broke, police said. Authorities said the truck had just collected trash from a Hess station on the corner of South Broad and Kater Streets around 10:30 a.m. and was heading east on Kater when it suddenly sank because the asphalt couldn't support the 13-ton vehicle's weight. The truck sank four to six feet, police said. Police said it was unclear when the water main had failed.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2014 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Damage was estimated in the millions of dollars Monday after the weekend break of a century-old water main flooded a $58 million shopping center near East Falls that opened only a few months ago. Water rose two feet inside the ShopRite supermarket at Bakers Centre, infiltrated a Ross store and others, and obliterated portions of an expansive parking lot after the 48-inch transmission main broke about 4:30 a.m. Saturday. Damage was extensive at the development, praised when it opened in late 2013 for its reuse of an old Tastykake warehouse in a longtime food desert.
NEWS
December 29, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
They have computers monitoring the pressure points. They send anti-corrosion chemicals jetting through the city's 3,000 miles of water pipes. They spend tens of millions of dollars each year replacing the weakest water mains. But despite the efforts of the staff of the Philadelphia Water Department, a massive water-main rupture like the one that occurred Monday at Frankford and Torresdale Avenues is almost guaranteed to happen again. "It's just part of the system," said Bill Miller, an associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at Temple University.
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