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NEWS
June 30, 2016
ISSUE | PHILA. DEVELOPMENT Diversity lost in One Water Street deal I thought the idea behind giving developers a zoning bonus allowing taller buildings in exchange for a certain number of affordable-housing units was to encourage people of various income levels to come in contact with each other. Such a policy would discourage isolated pockets of wealthy and low- and moderate-income families. The deal the city reached with PMC Property Group, builders of the 250-unit One Water Street apartment building on the Delaware waterfront, contributes to just the opposite ("Developer to pay for affordable housing," Saturday)
NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
Federal officials say the drinking water in Horsham Township is safe, but with mounting concern over contaminated water and a lack of answers about long-term health effects, officials in the Montgomery County town vowed Monday night to take extra steps to make their water even safer. "We understand that people have lost confidence in our water supply," Township Councilman Gregory Nesbitt told dozens of residents at Monday's meeting, where the council considered actions beyond federal guidelines to reduce the contamination in drinking water to an undetectable amount.
NEWS
June 28, 2016
ISSUE | WATER QUALITY Testing free in Philly The Philadelphia Water Department has been and continues to be fully in compliance with regulations to control lead and copper in drinking water, as determined by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection ("Time to get the lead out," Thursday). The Water Department will continue to work closely with the DEP to refine sampling protocols. The department has long offered free testing in homes for lead. Our consistent education and outreach - in public meetings, in brochures, on the internet, and on social media - have focused on the actions customers can take to ensure they are receiving clean and healthy drinking water from our mains.
NEWS
June 27, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
It's frustrating enough for water company workers to try to find an underground pipe with only a century-old handwritten piece of paper for reference. And sometimes, that slip of paper uses nonexistent landmarks - which house is it in front of? None of these houses is yellow anymore, and the writing is faded, or sloppy, or the drawing is crudely sketched. "And then you dig there - no, it's not there. And then you dig here - it's not here," said Chris Kahn, senior geographic information systems project manager for New Jersey American Water.
NEWS
June 26, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Responding to a request from Mayor Kenney, the luxury housing developer that reneged on a commitment to include affordable units at One Water Street has agreed to a settlement that channels $3.75 million into Philadelphia's Housing Trust Fund, according to Karen Guss, an administration spokeswoman. The deal, brokered late this week by what Guss called "senior administration officials," means that the developer, PMC Property Group, will be able to immediately start moving tenants into the sleek, contemporary 16-story apartment house on the Delaware waterfront.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
Yuengling brewery has agreed to settle violations of the Clean Water Act, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Thursday. In a consent decree filed Thursday in U.S. District Court in Harrisburg, the Pennsylvania brewery - America's oldest - agreed to spend about $7 million to improve environmental measures and pay a $2.8 million penalty. Federal authorities said D.G. Yuengling and Son Inc., based in Pottsville, Schuylkill County, violated Clean Water Act requirements for companies that discharge industrial waste to municipal publicly owned wastewater-treatment facilities.
NEWS
June 23, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
The state Department of Environmental Protection is trying to determine the source of an unacceptable level of contamination found in drinking water in Doylestown, officials said Tuesday. A public drinking well along Easton Road in the Cross Keys area was shut down last month after inspectors found levels of perfluorinated compounds higher than newly announced federal standards. Public drinking water there is now safe, officials said. But they are trying to identify how the well became contaminated with PFOS and PFOA.
NEWS
June 21, 2016 | By Debra McCarty
Five years ago this month, Philadelphia embarked on a comprehensive, innovative program that established the city as a national leader in environmental protection, storm-water management, and infrastructure improvements. Green City, Clean Waters is the city's 25-year plan to reduce storm-water pollution and protect our waterways by using primarily environmentally friendly infrastructure to mitigate problems related to runoff. In cities like Philadelphia, with vast areas of paved and impermeable surfaces, this is a huge problem.
NEWS
June 20, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel and Laura McCrystal, Staff Writers
When the planes burned, the kids would come out. Hope Grosse and her siblings would run down their Warminster street and rubberneck amid shrieking sirens. They would watch Navy firefighters shoot a dense white foam from hoses, smothering the flames that leapt up from the fenced-off lot. When the blackened plane was cool, the children would climb the fence and jump into the burned-out cockpit, pretending to be pilots, Grosse recounted. The plane, and the field where the Navy conducted drills, was also a playground for the Kirk Road kids back in the 1970s and '80s.
NEWS
June 20, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal and Justine McDaniel, STAFF WRITERS
As lawmakers demanded answers this spring about water contamination in Bucks and Montgomery Counties, Paul Lutz began chemotherapy. Lutz does not live in the area with the tainted drinking water, which came from chemicals used on naval air bases. But he worked at the Willow Grove Naval Air Station as a flight engineer. Now 44 and retired from the military, he has multiple myeloma. As water contamination near the base attracts scrutiny, Lutz and others who worked there wonder: What about us?
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