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BUSINESS
May 23, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania American Water says a boil-water advisory for 18,000 customers in six Montgomery County towns will remain in effect through Friday. The utility said water pressure had been restored to the distribution system served by its Norristown plant, which draws water from the Schuylkill. But it needs clean-water tests for two days before it can lift the advisory, according to Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection guidelines. "All signs are looking positive," Pennsylvania American spokesman Terry M. Maenza said Wednesday.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania American Water instructed 18,000 customers in six Montgomery County towns Tuesday night to boil water for human consumption after water supplies ran low because of problems at its Norristown treatment plant. Customers in East Norriton, West Norriton, Lower Providence, Whitpain, Worcester, and Whitemarsh Townships were told to boil water as a precaution after some parts of the utility's system ran dry. When water systems lose pressure, bacteria can enter. Boiling the water destroys the pathogens.
NEWS
May 19, 2014 | By Rick O'Brien and Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Stotesbury cup Regatta, the largest high school rowing event, canceled all semifinal races Saturday, with finals scheduled to begin at 2 p.m. with the boys' freshman eight. Organizers made the decision to cancel the seminfinal events early Saturday morning, after Friday's rainfall led to potentially dangerous rowing conditions on the Schuylkill River. At 11 a.m., they announced their decision to continue with the finals races only. Friday's storm led to high water levels, increased speed, and debris in the water.
REAL_ESTATE
May 19, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
A few weeks back, a reader asked for reasons why a wood floor was starting to extrude chips and slivers from between the boards. Doug Sandilands, of Shamrock Flooring in Aston, says it's his guess that the chips and slivers coming out of the floors are from an older type of waxed prefinished floors the industry called Kromar. "These boards are 5/16 inches thick by two inches wide," Sandilands said. "However, the depth from the face of the board to the tongue and groove is only about 1/16 of an inch.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
In late April, business partners Tommy Up and Sarah Brown put out an offer: Pitch in to help them open a tiki bar called the Yachtsman in Fishtown, and reap rewards ranging from a private party to your name engraved on a bar stool (plus the right to evict other patrons from said stool). Brown and Up - who is also the owner of PYT, a Northern Liberties eatery that is in the process of franchising its format of wacky burgers and boozy milkshakes - said construction overruns had cleaned them out. So, rather than seek a loan or bring in a partner, they decided to cash in their social capital via Kickstarter, an online crowdfunding platform through which anyone can donate, and funds are collected only if the target goal is reached.
BUSINESS
May 13, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
By now, Susan Story should be moved into her new office at the American Water Works Co. Inc. headquarters in Voorhees. "My computer is the first thing I have to have," said Story, 54, who became chief executive of the $2.9 billion utility at the company's annual meeting Friday, replacing president and CEO Jeff Sterba. "I have to have a chair that doesn't make my back hurt, and I have to have a picture of my husband and myself and our two dogs and that's about it," said Story, who joined the company April 1, 2013, as senior vice president and chief financial officer.
NEWS
May 3, 2014 | By Barbara Boyer and Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writers
By the time commuters were getting ready to venture home Wednesday, a colossal traffic jam already was developing - in the atmosphere. A cluster of showers moved into the Philadelphia region at midafternoon, and then, "it just kind of stopped," said Valerie Meola at the National Weather Service in Mount Holly. The result was the region's wettest spring day in 142 years of record-keeping, widespread major flooding along suddenly chocolate-brown waterways, a rash of water rescues, streets more suitable for kayaks than cars, and prodigious cleanup chores likely to lap into the first weekend of May. More than a half-foot of rain - or two months' worth - fell on some areas, and flood warnings remained posted for the Schuylkill from Philadelphia to the Norristown area, the site of major flooding, into Thursday afternoon.
NEWS
May 2, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kenneth E. Shull, 97, formerly of Media, a chemist and executive for the Philadelphia Suburban Water Co., died Tuesday, April 22, of congestive heart failure at White Horse Village. Mr. Shull's enthusiasm for science started early and blossomed into a career choice, said his son, Dave. "When he was young, he built a laboratory in his basement. It was quite sophisticated," his son said. Mr. Shull worked for Philadelphia Suburban Water Co., now Aqua America Inc., in Bryn Mawr for 45 years, starting in 1938 as a chemist and bacteriologist, and becoming chief chemist and then superintendent of water treatment in 1956.
NEWS
May 1, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
LAWRENCEVILLE, N.J. After a hiatus of more than three years that had upset environmentalists, the state's advisory panel for drinking water standards reconvened Tuesday and immediately began considering regulations for a contaminant that has disconcerted several South Jersey towns. The Drinking Water Quality Institute's meeting was its first since September 2010. Half of the panel is new, either appointed or ex-officio since then. The institute was created in 1983 to make regulatory recommendations to the state Department of Environmental Protection.
BUSINESS
April 23, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania American Water on Monday announced plans to buy 18 trucks fueled by compressed natural gas under terms of a $315,000 state grant funded from the Marcellus Shale impact fee. The new vehicles will be based in the water company's Scranton operations. Pennsylvania American last year launched a pilot with four CNG-powered pickup trucks in Punxsutawney and Coatesville. In November, it also received a $62,800 Alternative Fuel Incentive Grant from the state Department of Environmental Protection to convert 14 new light-duty trucks to CNG. This year's grant, financed by the impact fee paid by natural gas producers, was secured through a partnership with Greater Philadelphia Clean Cities Coalition, which serves 34 counties in eastern Pennsylvania to implement alternative fuel use in transportation.
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