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NEWS
April 7, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
The Lower Merion School District's Penn Wynne School has shut off drinking fountains and provided bottled water to students after a routine screening indicated elevated levels of lead in water from a cafeteria faucet. Administrators at the 600-student elementary school got the results Tuesday afternoon and immediately contacted the Environmental Protection Agency, the Aqua America water company, and the Montgomery County Department of Health, principal Shawn Bernatowicz wrote in a letter to parents.
NEWS
April 2, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
Camden's water system has improved in key ways since 2009, the year an audit compared the utility to that of a Third World country, according to a state report released Thursday. The office of the state comptroller found that Camden officials and United Water fully or partially implemented 19 of 23 recommendations made in that 2009 audit. Two recommendations are no longer applicable. "I am encouraged by the improvements the City has made, as well as its continued commitment to further progress," said Philip James Degnan, acting state comptroller, in a statement.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania American Water announced it has signed an agreement to acquire the wastewater assets of the Scranton Sewer Authority for $195 million. The company, a subsidiary of American Water of Voorhees, already provides water service to the sewer system's 31,000 customers. The transaction, which went through a 10-month bidding process, requires the approval of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, the state Public Utility Commission and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
NEWS
March 23, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
As the water crisis in Flint, Mich., stokes concerns about lead in drinking supplies nationwide, water officials in Philadelphia wanted to make something clear Monday: Philly is not Flint. Lead is rarely found in drinking water here, officials said at an investigatory hearing of City Council. In cases where children were found to have lead exposure, drinking water was not the culprit, officials said. But Council members still pressed water and health officials to do more to address the estimated 50,000 homes that are connected to city water mains by lead pipes, saying even trace amounts of lead are too much.
NEWS
March 12, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
Two Dimock, Pa., families who declined a Marcellus Shale gas driller's offer in 2012 to settle their claims of water contamination were awarded $4.24 million Thursday by a federal jury. The verdict in U.S. District Court in Scranton was a blow to Cabot Oil & Gas Corp., which had maintained that its drilling was not responsible for the elevated level of methane in the families' water wells. The eight-member jury found that Cabot's drilling was negligent and created a nuisance for the families of Scott Ely and Monica Marta-Ely and Ray and Victoria Hubert.
NEWS
March 10, 2016 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - On again, off again, on again, kind of like a faucet. That would be an apt way to describe Atlantic City's actions to protect its water utility from takeover by either a corporate water company or the county's utility authority. On Tuesday, City Council President Marty Small once again embraced the strategy of making the Municipal Utility Authority (MUA) a city department - an action supported by both the state-appointed emergency manager and Mayor Don Guardian, but at which council has balked twice in recent months.
REAL_ESTATE
March 6, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
If I made water softeners for a living, I'd sure as shooting be interested in consumer attitudes about hard water. Wouldn't you? That's a rhetorical question. No replies are necessary. It should come as no surprise, then, that Morton Salt, which makes water-softening products, found in a survey that 85 percent of American homes have hard water, though many homeowners might not know it, and even more don't know how to fix it. More than 90 percent of 500 Americans surveyed deal with soap scum or water stains caused by hard water, Morton said.
NEWS
March 5, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
SCRANTON - Erik Roos waited more than six years to tell a jury his story about shale-gas drilling and water contamination in rural Dimock Township. When he finally got a chance to testify this week, he was done in about a half-hour. Roos was one of 44 Dimock residents who sued Cabot Oil & Gas Co. in federal court in 2009, alleging that the company's Marcellus Shale drilling had polluted their water wells. Roos and most of the plaintiffs settled in 2012, to his enduring dissatisfaction.
NEWS
March 5, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
Is toxic water in the vicinity of the former Naval Air Station Willow Grove and the Naval Air Warfare Center in Warminster making people sick? That's the concern three area congressmen raised Thursday in a letter to the Navy demanding answers about the government's knowledge of the water issues. "Residents who consumed the contaminated water have understandable concern that these chemicals, which studies show can cause serious illness, are the cause of their own health conditions," wrote U.S. Reps.
NEWS
March 2, 2016
The public will have three chances this week to give feedback and get information on water-rate increases proposed by the Philadelphia Water Department. Under the proposal, a typical residential customer's monthly water bill would increase by $4.20, or 6.2 percent, on July 1; and another $3.90, or 5.5 percent, on July 1, 2017. By then, the typical residential bill would have gone from $67.40 to $75.50. By July 2017, senior citizens would have seen their monthly bills go from $50.50 to $56.60 The rate increases are needed for, among other expenses, to repair and replace the city's 6,000-plus miles of aging water and sewer pipes, and to comply with regularity requirements, water officials said.
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