CollectionsWatercolors
IN THE NEWS

Watercolors

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 11, 1999 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
All of Philip Jamison's strongest paintings have a certain fleeting quality. Moreover, Jamison is at his best as an artist when he is least typical - when the clusters of daisies for which he is widely known and the Wyeth-esque rural subjects give way to elusively personal approaches. So Jamison's best watercolor paintings (his principal medium) always have the brevity of sketches, something easily seen in his current 81-item exhibit at the Chester County Historical Society, covering his four-decade career.
NEWS
April 27, 2003 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When Shelley Picker tore up her front lawn a few years back, even her husband was a bit apprehensive. But Picker, an artist and avid gardener, had no doubts. "We're going to have a perennial garden," she announced. And, sure enough, a colorful, delightfully varied walk-through garden now winds its way to the entrance of her home, providing inspiration for her paintings and a refreshing respite for passersby. Picker's large-scale watercolors of eye-catching blooms reflect her passion for the wonders she finds in nature.
NEWS
June 16, 1994 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For nearly 20 years Anita Gronendahl showcased the work of regional artists, helping many get their start. This month her husband is filling the gallery with her paintings, a memorial to her life and talents. Gronendahl, who died in January of cancer, had presented four shows a year since 1976, when she opened the Barn Studio Gallery in Plumstead Township. Her husband, Dutch Gronendahl, has been working the last few months putting together the memorial exhibition. "This is going to be a very different show," Dutch Gronendahl said.
NEWS
September 9, 1993 | By Bill Frischling, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Almost five years to the day when art dealer W. Graham Arader 3d discovered $471,000 in watercolors missing from his office in King of Prussia, Arader opened a desk drawer in his spacious home on County Line Road and experienced deja vu. Once again, some of Arader's prized botanical watercolors, painted by Pierre-Joseph Redoute, were missing. But what puzzles Arader and police is the illogical nature of the theft. Three watercolors, valued at $90,000, were taken from the drawer, but two other, equally valuable Redoute watercolors, along with other artwork, were left behind.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2010 | By Victoria Donohoe FOR THE INQUIRER
Eileen Goodman is that agreeable thing, a painterly painter. And like her sensibility, her paintings of large, branching fruited or flowering plants and occasional still lifes shrug off the prescribed boundaries of any one medium in her "New Works" show at Gross McCleaf. So, where did Goodman get the experience she needed for big, bold works of this kind that you would swear were oil paintings, but are actually watercolors? Goodman has an oil-painting background, yet has painted only in watercolor for years.
NEWS
June 15, 1995 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Realistic watercolors are at the heart of the Oreland Art Center's 37th annual juried show, which can be seen through Sunday. More than 100 paintings, representing the work of about 70 artists from the Philadelphia area, have been selected for the exhibit. Domenic DiStefano, a member of the Philadelphia Watercolor Club and recent judge for the American Watercolor Society Show in New York, reviewed about 160 entries for the show. "The show is heavy on watercolors and representational paintings, but the styles are very different," said Diane Maurer, chairwoman for the exhibit.
NEWS
October 26, 1999 | JOHN SLAVIN / Inquirer Suburban Staff
Yesterday was picture perfect for artist Glenna Lange Bye, who was taking up the challenge of matching nature's autumnal palette with her watercolors during a visit to Washington Crossing Historic Park.
NEWS
October 26, 1994 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Samuel Joseph Brown Jr., an artist whose work issued powerful statements of the African-American experience and were included in collections from the White House to the museums of major American cities, died Sunday of heart failure. He was 87 and lived in West Philadelphia. An art teacher in the city school system for more than 30 years, Brown came to flower as an artist, as did so many others, during the Depression when the Works Progress Administration (WPA) sponsored artists through the Public Works of Art Project.
NEWS
February 22, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a highly unusual outcome to conservation efforts, the Barnes Foundation has discovered it owns two previously unknown Cézanne sketches - even collector Albert C. Barnes was most likely unaware of their existence. The two works, unmentioned in any correspondence and not included in the master compendium of Cézanne's works, are on the backs of two watercolors that are permanently hung in the foundation's galleries on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. The works had been taken down a year ago for needed conservation.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 22, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a highly unusual outcome to conservation efforts, the Barnes Foundation has discovered it owns two previously unknown Cézanne sketches - even collector Albert C. Barnes was most likely unaware of their existence. The two works, unmentioned in any correspondence and not included in the master compendium of Cézanne's works, are on the backs of two watercolors that are permanently hung in the foundation's galleries on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. The works had been taken down a year ago for needed conservation.
NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The paintings of algae seem to glow with a greenish light, the slender fronds rendered with painstaking detail at up to 1,000 times actual size. The eye of 19th-century artist Cornelius Varley was involved in creating the images, but something else was at work: A sophisticated optical instrument that gave him the illusion of seeing the algae right on his canvas. Think it makes the artist's job easy? Think again. Varley's algae watercolors, along with a variety of such optical instruments, are on display at the American Philosophical Society Museum through Dec. 29, including three devices that visitors can look through as they attempt their own sketches.
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Frank Wilson, For The Inquirer
Paris before it became the City of Light; the watercolors of an artist best known for portraits; creatures conjured from the medieval imagination - these are just a few of the fruits in this year's crop of books to be put out in the open, not hidden away on shelves. If you think books may be passé, check out the gorgeous buildings that house so many of them. Prices are list, but discounts abound. John Singer Sargent: Watercolors (MFA Publications/Brooklyn Museum, $60) . Sargent wasn't eager to show or sell his watercolors.
NEWS
September 16, 2011 | By David Iams, For The Inquirer
Thanks to its horse country location, the intersection of Providence and Goshen Roads in Willistown Township is not only picturesque, it is also rich in social, or at least socialite, history: the Radnor Races traffic jams there every May, the farms on three of its corners there bouncing from one family to another, including, years ago, the Wetherills, and the quaint blacksmith shop on the fourth. So there is little doubt a 24-inch-by-39-inch watercolor of the crossroads done in 1975 by Peter Sculthorpe will attract considerable attention from area bidders when it goes on the block at Wiederseim Associates' sale Saturday at the Ludwig's Corner Fire Company in Glenmoore - even though the picture (labeled Land of Goshen on the back)
NEWS
June 19, 2011 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Alfred Jacob Miller was one of a half-dozen American artists, some foreign-born, who introduced the Western frontier, particularly indigenous cultures, to American art. This happened mainly in the 1830s, when Miller and his contemporaries ventured beyond the Mississippi River into the Great Plains, as far as the Rocky Mountains. The first to go, perhaps the most prolific and best-known Indian painter, was George Catlin, a native of Wilkes-Barre, who traveled up the Missouri River for 2,000 miles with an American Fur Co. expedition in 1832.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2011 | By Victoria Donohoe, For The Inquirer
'Barry Moser: Bookwright" at Brandywine River Museum provides an absorbing glimpse into the world of this prominent Massachusetts illustrator through 75 wood engravings and watercolors and several of the limited-edition books produced by his Pennyroyal Press. Artists are still making wood engravings? Weren't those 18th-century offshoots of the woodcut medium eventually swallowed up by the printing industry? That's true, but creativity started coming back into wood engraving in the 20th century, both abroad and, with German emigre Fritz Eichenberg, in this country.
NEWS
October 27, 2010 | By John Shiffman, Inquirer Staff Writer
When a great master dies, two things often follow - the artist's work skyrockets in value, and forgers emerge from the shadows, eager to make a buck. It happened to the likes of Vincent van Gogh, Jackson Pollock, and Andy Warhol. Now, it's happening to Andrew Wyeth. But faking Wyeth's work is proving difficult, even for skilled forgers. His wife's ferocious attention to detail decades ago is providing rare evidence to help art detectives curb this growing crime, said art historian Jonathan Lopez, author of The Man Who Made Vermeers . The latest Wyeth forgery - at least the seventh since his death last year - was the most skilled yet. Offered at auction by Christie's in New York earlier this year, the painting was expected to fetch $300,000 to $500,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2010 | By Victoria Donohoe FOR THE INQUIRER
Eileen Goodman is that agreeable thing, a painterly painter. And like her sensibility, her paintings of large, branching fruited or flowering plants and occasional still lifes shrug off the prescribed boundaries of any one medium in her "New Works" show at Gross McCleaf. So, where did Goodman get the experience she needed for big, bold works of this kind that you would swear were oil paintings, but are actually watercolors? Goodman has an oil-painting background, yet has painted only in watercolor for years.
NEWS
September 2, 2008 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Marianna S. Glass, 62, of Devon, an architectural illustrator, died of pneumonia July 19 at Bryn Mawr Hospital. In 1967, Mrs. Glass set up Marianna Shaw Illustration, which she operated out of her home until recently. Her husband, Stephen, said that from her studio she made "detailed watercolor perspectives for architects, builders and interior designers" across the nation. For a time in the early 1970s, her husband said, she worked for ARA Services, now Aramark, designing from blueprints such features as "dining facilities for hotels, university cafeterias, corporate boardrooms.
LIVING
June 20, 2008 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Between the artwork in the first session of Barry S. Slosberg's two-day quality sale of fine furniture and art and the 150 lots of American and European paintings being offered at Freeman's, Sunday looks to be a busy day for bidders. The Slosberg sale begins at 10 a.m. at 2501 E. Ontario St. The roughly 80 lots of artwork include both American and European artists, notably a signed acrylic oil-on-board depiction of Jerusalem by Zvi Mairovich. "Russian artists are very hot these days," Slosberg said this week.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|