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NEWS
April 23, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jack H. Weinstein, 84, formerly of Merion, a retired psychiatrist, died of a stroke April 11 at the Watermark at Logan Square in Philadelphia. For more than 42 years, Dr. Weinstein treated patients at the Institute of Pennsylvania Hospital, a former facility for the mentally ill in West Philadelphia. He served on institute committees, supervised medical residents, and headed the physicians staff for several years. A specialist in bipolar disorder, he was a pioneer in the use of medications to treat psychiatric disorders and lectured other physicians on the subject, his family said.
NEWS
July 31, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ethel Invernizzi, 93, of Center City, a longtime kindergarten teacher, died Wednesday, July 23, of complications from a stroke at her home in the Watermark at Logan Square. Miss Invernizzi was born in Arlington, Mass. Not long afterward, her family moved to Philadelphia, where her father, an Italian immigrant, had landed a job as a printer at Curtis Publishing Co. She graduated from West Philadelphia High School in 1938 and from Temple University in 1943. She was the first of her family to go to college.
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alfred Rizzio, 95, who styled the hair of Hollywood stars including Joan Crawford and Rita Hayworth, and later adapted his artistic touch to gardening and floral arranging, died Sunday, Nov. 4, at Hahnemann University Hospital. Mr. Rizzio also was the hairstylist for Elsa Lanchester, Eve Arden, Frances Langford, and other entertainers over three decades, said his relatives. "Joan Crawford and Dorothy McGuire were his two most gracious customers," said his cousin Sandy Marrone. She said Mr. Rizzio told her, "They were exceptionally enjoyable to work with.
NEWS
March 7, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Empathy - the kind where you try to think your way into understanding how others feel - only gets you so far. The leaders of the Watermark at Logan Square, a senior-living high-rise in Philadelphia, recently helped the children of two residents take their empathy to a new level. After just a few minutes of being "garbed" with some low-tech handicapping devices, Richard Abraham, 59, a stock trader who lives in Havertown, and Becky Jones, 53, a Widener University political science professor who lives near the Art Museum, developed a new appreciation for what it's like to be old and have dementia.
NEWS
March 25, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Helen Satinsky Splaver, a retired financial adviser, writer, and artist, died March 12 at the Watermark at Logan Square, three weeks before her 101st birthday. For more than a decade, until retiring in the mid-1970s, Mrs. Splaver was a top sales agent for Renyx Field & Co., a securities dealer specializing in mutual funds. She was dismayed when she found out that despite her success, men in the office were paid more, said a daughter, Meg Groff. Besides confronting sexism at work, Mrs. Splaver taught courses for the American Jewish Congress on how to respond to bigots, and cochaired a defense committee for a black union organizer jailed on false charges in Georgia.
NEWS
November 10, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William S. Weil Jr., 93, a founder of Allens Lane Art Center in Mount Airy, died of heart failure Oct. 19 at Watermark at Logan Square, a retirement community in Philadelphia. Mr. Weil was an engineer and, during his lifetime, owned two businesses - one for television repairs, the other an electronics manufacturing company. While raising a family in Germantown, Mr. Weil became active with a group of parents, his daughter Cindy Brandt said, who were seeking ways to improve relations in the increasingly diverse community.
NEWS
June 30, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Herbert Ginensky, 94, a World War II veteran and devoted husband for nearly seven decades, died Thursday, June 27, at the Watermark senior community in Center City. Mr. Ginensky died of heart failure, said his daughter, Amy Ginensky. His wife, Evelyn, who was 91, died in November. They married on July 6, 1944. During the war, he met his future wife through a cousin who was dating one of Evelyn's sisters. "My father thought she was too young-looking," but on a second date, he reconsidered, his daughter said.
NEWS
December 25, 2009 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Doris Grossman is not one of those fluttery white-haired women who shy away from life's harsher truths. "I don't know if it's empathy or anger because we're involved in two wars," she says, "but I feel this is the right thing to do. " For the last two years, around Christmas, Grossman has been knitting socks for war amputees. Yesterday, the 82-year-old former assistant manager for a senior-citizen complex in Ventnor, N.J., was working on an oatmeal-tweed one, her 12th in the latest batch destined for the Philadelphia veterans hospital.
NEWS
July 13, 2010
Melvin D. Katin, 86, formerly of Havertown and Delray Beach, Fla., a retired stockbroker, died of prostate cancer Saturday, July 10, at the Watermark at Logan Square. Mr. Katin graduated from Northeast High School. During World War II, he served in the Army Air Force. He attended aviation cadet school at North Carolina State University and was stationed in Indiana. After his discharge, he earned a bachelor's degree from Pennsylvania State University. While in college, he spent a summer as a volunteer repairing damage from wartime bombings in London.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1992 | By Fred Beckley, FOR THE INQUIRER
Enya's music is what you listen to when you want to read, or think, or take a nap, or calm the dog, or practice law - or just about anything, except really listen to music. Her noncommittal washes of sound create a comfortable background, a sort of aural wallpaper carefully hung so as not to disturb the senses. She makes music that even your grandmother would think is wimpy. But unlike listening to most new-age music - a term usually as oxymoronic as airline schedule - listening to an Enya record won't make you want to grind healing crystals into your stereo speakers.
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BUSINESS
May 22, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Watermark at Logan Square retirement complex was acquired earlier this month for $65.3 million by a company identified as SNR 21 Logan Square Owner, according to city records. The buyer shares a Texas address with Fortress Investment Group in a related document filed with the city. Watermark Logan Partners sold the property to SNR 21. Fortress spokesman Gordon Runte and Watermark spokeswoman Jill Hofer did not return calls seeking comment. The Watermark has 464 rental apartments and assisted-living units, according to the property's website.
NEWS
May 21, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER jadelman@phillynews.com 215-854-2615 @jacobadelman
New York-based Carey Watermark Investors plans a $21.3 million renovation of the Ritz-Carlton Philadelphia hotel after acquiring a majority interest in the property, the company said in a release. The renovation, to be done in a joint venture with previous full-owner Philadelphia Hospitality Partners, will cover the South Broad Street hotel's 299 guest rooms, lobby, ballroom and other spaces, Carey Watermark said. Work is due to be completed before the end of June 2016, the company said.
NEWS
March 7, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Empathy - the kind where you try to think your way into understanding how others feel - only gets you so far. The leaders of the Watermark at Logan Square, a senior-living high-rise in Philadelphia, recently helped the children of two residents take their empathy to a new level. After just a few minutes of being "garbed" with some low-tech handicapping devices, Richard Abraham, 59, a stock trader who lives in Havertown, and Becky Jones, 53, a Widener University political science professor who lives near the Art Museum, developed a new appreciation for what it's like to be old and have dementia.
NEWS
July 31, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ethel Invernizzi, 93, of Center City, a longtime kindergarten teacher, died Wednesday, July 23, of complications from a stroke at her home in the Watermark at Logan Square. Miss Invernizzi was born in Arlington, Mass. Not long afterward, her family moved to Philadelphia, where her father, an Italian immigrant, had landed a job as a printer at Curtis Publishing Co. She graduated from West Philadelphia High School in 1938 and from Temple University in 1943. She was the first of her family to go to college.
NEWS
June 30, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Herbert Ginensky, 94, a World War II veteran and devoted husband for nearly seven decades, died Thursday, June 27, at the Watermark senior community in Center City. Mr. Ginensky died of heart failure, said his daughter, Amy Ginensky. His wife, Evelyn, who was 91, died in November. They married on July 6, 1944. During the war, he met his future wife through a cousin who was dating one of Evelyn's sisters. "My father thought she was too young-looking," but on a second date, he reconsidered, his daughter said.
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alfred Rizzio, 95, who styled the hair of Hollywood stars including Joan Crawford and Rita Hayworth, and later adapted his artistic touch to gardening and floral arranging, died Sunday, Nov. 4, at Hahnemann University Hospital. Mr. Rizzio also was the hairstylist for Elsa Lanchester, Eve Arden, Frances Langford, and other entertainers over three decades, said his relatives. "Joan Crawford and Dorothy McGuire were his two most gracious customers," said his cousin Sandy Marrone. She said Mr. Rizzio told her, "They were exceptionally enjoyable to work with.
NEWS
October 11, 2010
Jeanette J. Barrell-Weislow, 71, a longtime Wynnewood resident and sales manager for a Philadelphia real estate company, died Tuesday, Oct. 5, of complications from a stroke at her home in the Watermark in Logan Square. Mrs. Barrell-Weislow was born in London, and in the late 1950s she worked as an administrative assistant for Hillier, Parker, May & Rowden, a commercial-property services firm in Britain. She met Owen Weislow, an American serving abroad in the Air Force, on a blind date, and they married in 1959.
NEWS
July 21, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marian Taylor Mitchell, 91, former president of the board of the Philadelphia History Museum at the Atwater Kent and widow of the prominent sculptor Henry Mitchell, died of lung cancer Friday, June 4, at the Watermark on Logan Square. For 38 years, Mrs. Mitchell was married to Henry Mitchell, whose work included the Impala Fountain at the Philadelphia Zoo, the Winged Ox at Thomas Jefferson University, and the "Running Free" horse sculptures at Drexel University. After her husband's death in 1980, Mrs. Mitchell joined the board of the Atwater Kent and was president from 1984 to 1992.
NEWS
July 13, 2010
Melvin D. Katin, 86, formerly of Havertown and Delray Beach, Fla., a retired stockbroker, died of prostate cancer Saturday, July 10, at the Watermark at Logan Square. Mr. Katin graduated from Northeast High School. During World War II, he served in the Army Air Force. He attended aviation cadet school at North Carolina State University and was stationed in Indiana. After his discharge, he earned a bachelor's degree from Pennsylvania State University. While in college, he spent a summer as a volunteer repairing damage from wartime bombings in London.
NEWS
March 25, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Helen Satinsky Splaver, a retired financial adviser, writer, and artist, died March 12 at the Watermark at Logan Square, three weeks before her 101st birthday. For more than a decade, until retiring in the mid-1970s, Mrs. Splaver was a top sales agent for Renyx Field & Co., a securities dealer specializing in mutual funds. She was dismayed when she found out that despite her success, men in the office were paid more, said a daughter, Meg Groff. Besides confronting sexism at work, Mrs. Splaver taught courses for the American Jewish Congress on how to respond to bigots, and cochaired a defense committee for a black union organizer jailed on false charges in Georgia.
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