CollectionsWatermelon
IN THE NEWS

Watermelon

FEATURED ARTICLES
FOOD
September 6, 2007
Watermelon has moved from the backyard picnic and into the dining room. And not just the juicy red variety. There's yellow, too. You won't notice much difference in taste between them, but together they provide a great visual in refreshing salads dotting local late-summer menus. At Audrey Claire near Rittenhouse Square, chef de cuisine Greg Garbacz tops watermelon chunks with crumbled Grana Padano cheese, thin-sliced red onion, and fresh mint. At Twenty21 in Commerce Square, sous chef Colin Leary has offered watermelon salad on his $24 lunch prix-fixe: dice-size cubes of melon and fried, panko-crusted puffs of goat cheese in a sweet sauce including shallots, mint and lavender, all on an oversize lettuce leaf.
SPORTS
October 23, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
Miami linebacker Junior Seau insists he meant no harm when he suggested the way to stop former teammate LaDainian Tomlinson is to feed him fried chicken and watermelon. Tomlinson, whose Chargers face the Dolphins on Monday night, said he was not angered by the comments. Asked yesterday how to limit Tomlinson, San Diego's star running back, Seau told reporters: "You give him watermelon and load him up with fried chicken and tell him to keep eating. " Seau, who is of Samoan descent, later said he and Tomlinson, who is black, are friends and the comment was meant in jest.
NEWS
August 28, 2003 | By DAVID MARGOLICK
MAYBE IT ran on the obit page, and I missed it. But a notable death has occurred, unrecorded. The venerable watermelon - the one with seeds - has died, of entirely unnatural causes. It was at least 5,000 years old, and lived, well, fondly in our memories. For a long time, watermelon as we have known and loved it has been an endangered species. Everywhere you look, whether in state-of-the-art supermarkets or those quaint "farm stands" whose fruit often comes out of the same crates from the same California conglomerates, all you see is the newfangled "seedless" variety.
LIVING
August 16, 1998 | By Annette John-Hall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
I peeled away the T-shirt stuck to the small of my back and mopped the sweat from my forehead as I entered the canteen of our neighborhood swim club. The sun showed no early-morning mercy to those of us watching our children compete in a meet. The canteen offered shade and the sustenance I needed to quiet the growling in my stomach to at least a purr. Joining the club in our suburban town had been good for us. Our children had become proficient, competitive swimmers and had met new friends.
NEWS
July 13, 1994 | By CLAUDE LEWIS
I have a novel idea: Let us all call one another by our rightful names without resorting to the use of colorful, and often offensive, characterizations. I'm certainly not in favor of official speech codes or suppression of language. Rather, I'm hoping that each of us will agree to attempt to control our use of careless language, especially in the workplace. One man's metaphor can be another's intimidation. As every big-city mayor learns, loose language can be as costly as it is dangerous.
NEWS
August 16, 1999 | SCOTT S. HAMRICK / Inquirer Suburban Staff
Testing his prowess at watermelon-seed spitting, David Murphy tries to land one the farthest during a contest at the Delaware County 4-H Fair in Newtown Square. The annual event also featured a livestock auction and vegetable contest.
FOOD
July 5, 2013 | By Sara Moulton, Associated Press
If you've never tasted fresh lemonade, you don't know what you're missing. It's just so much more vivid than the supermarket stuff, much more about the lemon and less about the sugar. True, juicing the lemons can be a pain, but the process becomes very near painless if you start by softening the lemons in the microwave for 30 seconds. Then all you have to do is add sugar syrup - a mixture of sugar and water, heated until the sugar dissolves - and some cold water. Done. In short, it's hard to top fresh lemonade all by itself.
NEWS
August 16, 1999 | SCOTT S. HAMRICK / Inquirer Suburban Staff
The Scales brothers, Charlie and Henry (right), make friends with a curious sheep at the Delaware County 4-H Fair. The annual event featured such staples as a livestock auction and vegetable contest, as well as new competitions for watermelon-seed spitting and stinky shoes. Held on the grounds of the Garrett Williamson Foundation in Newtown Square, it is the only agricultural fair in Delaware County.
FOOD
September 1, 1993 | by Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
What's your best buy in fruit, nutritionally speaking? Melons offer relatively more vitamins for fewer calories than any other fruit - even that old "diet fruit," grapefruit. What's unique about cantaloupe - in addition to its ultra-low-calorie count, only 41 per quarter - is its double-whammy of vitamins A and C. Where grapefruit or orange juice with breakfast provides mainly vitamin C, you get both C and A from a slice of melon, and save on the calories besides. Melons are versatile and can be enjoyed all year - fresh from the freezer.
NEWS
September 6, 2013
DAVIN SCHULSON'S CITRUSADE 2 lemons juiced 2 limes juiced 2 oranges juiced 2 tablespoons maple syrup 1 tablespoon agave 2 quarts water Mix all together and serve over ice. SMOOTHIE 1 pint raspberries 1 pint strawberries, hulled 1 cup chopped watermelon Freeze all the ingredients overnight. Remove from freezer, place all ingredients into a blender. Blend until smooth. Drink right away, or pour into an ice-pop mold and freeze again overnight.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 6, 2013
DAVIN SCHULSON'S CITRUSADE 2 lemons juiced 2 limes juiced 2 oranges juiced 2 tablespoons maple syrup 1 tablespoon agave 2 quarts water Mix all together and serve over ice. SMOOTHIE 1 pint raspberries 1 pint strawberries, hulled 1 cup chopped watermelon Freeze all the ingredients overnight. Remove from freezer, place all ingredients into a blender. Blend until smooth. Drink right away, or pour into an ice-pop mold and freeze again overnight.
NEWS
August 5, 2013 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's a little messier than usual this weekend at the Franklin Institute, where special exhibits give children hands-on experience with gravity, pressure, and chemistry. Outside the museum Saturday, about 200 people gathered every hour on the hour to see demonstrations by staff scientists acting out vaudeville scripts. Liquid nitrogen and soapy water exploded into an "epic soap bubble monster. " A toilet-paper typhoon demonstrated aerodynamics. Falling Jell-O, spaghetti, and melons showed the law of gravity.
FOOD
July 19, 2013
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat of July 16, 2013: Craig LaBan: In last week's chat, a reader recommended Kidari Sushi Yatai, from Raw's former sushi chef Sam Yoon, the new raw-fish counter on the 1800 block of South Street (across from the old Graduate Hospital). I'd had a so-so visit, so decided to go back and I really enjoyed it - especially this Cy-sashimi don, basically a sashimi salad with ribbons of tuna, yellowtail, and salmon with roe over greens and a bed of rice with gochuchang vinaigrette on the side.
FOOD
July 5, 2013 | By Sara Moulton, Associated Press
If you've never tasted fresh lemonade, you don't know what you're missing. It's just so much more vivid than the supermarket stuff, much more about the lemon and less about the sugar. True, juicing the lemons can be a pain, but the process becomes very near painless if you start by softening the lemons in the microwave for 30 seconds. Then all you have to do is add sugar syrup - a mixture of sugar and water, heated until the sugar dissolves - and some cold water. Done. In short, it's hard to top fresh lemonade all by itself.
FOOD
July 8, 2010 | By Ellise Pierce, McClatchy Newspapers
Growing up in Texas, I remember tasting watermelon that was so sweet that we'd sprinkle salt on the oversize, half-moon slices to balance the flavors. Eating the cartoony wedges was always an adventure - the watermelon itself was no match for the flimsy white paper plates - and the seeds . . . what were we supposed to do if not spit them at each other? Let's face it, watermelon's just fun. Its striped outside and bright pink, black polka-dotted middle give it a visual appeal like no other fruit, and the taste - such sweet goodness!
NEWS
August 31, 2008 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In Bensalem, the soaring cost of food means that grilled cheese will be harder to find in the school lunch line. In Washington Township, it translates to iceberg lettuce instead of pricier romaine, and more applications for free and reduced-price lunches. And in Coatesville, it may mean fewer kaiser rolls and more white bread. Across the region and the country, higher food prices are raising school lunch prices and squeezing some variety out of what the government sells to districts.
FOOD
July 3, 2008 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Not that you need an excuse to eat more watermelon, but it does have 40 percent more of the antioxidant lycopene than tomatoes. Plus, according to the USDA, watermelon is fat-free and a good source of vitamins A, B6, C and thiamin. But picking a ripe melon can be tricky. If only you could taste it before buying. "I love watermelon, and I taste away when I'm shopping for it," says Jimmy Iovine of Iovine Brothers Produce in the Reading Terminal Market. He's been selling watermelons from Florida and Georgia lately, but the Jersey crop should be in this week, he says.
NEWS
April 26, 2008
Shame on Mayor Nutter for using the power of the office that many Obama supporters, like me, gave him - to promote a candidate we oppose. I supported Michael Nutter, voted for him and encouraged my friends and neighbors to vote for him as a reform candidate. Now I see him leading a "payback campaign" for a candidate I view as a representing the status quo in politics. I put Mayor Nutter in office with my vote, not the Clintons. Kay Welch Mosby, Philadelphia Mayor Nutter's comment about fried chicken, watermelon and black people (April 7)
FOOD
September 6, 2007
Watermelon has moved from the backyard picnic and into the dining room. And not just the juicy red variety. There's yellow, too. You won't notice much difference in taste between them, but together they provide a great visual in refreshing salads dotting local late-summer menus. At Audrey Claire near Rittenhouse Square, chef de cuisine Greg Garbacz tops watermelon chunks with crumbled Grana Padano cheese, thin-sliced red onion, and fresh mint. At Twenty21 in Commerce Square, sous chef Colin Leary has offered watermelon salad on his $24 lunch prix-fixe: dice-size cubes of melon and fried, panko-crusted puffs of goat cheese in a sweet sauce including shallots, mint and lavender, all on an oversize lettuce leaf.
NEWS
April 22, 2007 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
If you have already tasted the sublime seviche of watermelon and scallops at the new Mexican restaurant called Xochitl, then you might understand Steven Cook's reaction last year to a tasting meal at Dionicio Jimenez's home: "I wanted to be in the Dionicio business. " Some people might have hesitated to invest in a 33-year-old with no head-chef experience who arrived in Philadelphia from Mexico nine years ago with no money to his name (though two brothers generously spotted him a starter loan)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|