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Watershed

NEWS
November 17, 1991 | By Kathi Kauffman, Special to The Inquirer
The Lower Merion-Narberth Watershed Association is looking for volunteers willing to roll up their sleeves and get wet. At noon Saturday, the association will begin planting about 7,000 brown- trout eggs in Mill Creek. The boxes that hold the eggs, Vibert boxes, will be placed in areas of the stream that are well-aerated from consistent water flows. Watershed members will work with volunteers to map out placement of the boxes, which hold 500 eggs apiece. Volunteers will cover the boxes with large stones and anchor them to form egg beds for the trout.
NEWS
August 16, 2010 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
SCRANTON - An energy company is on track to drill the first natural gas production wells in northeastern Pennsylvania's Wayne County. Drilling in the Marcellus Shale formation is banned in nearly all of the county because it lies within the Delaware River watershed. The Delaware River Basin Commission recently declared a moratorium on drilling in the watershed, citing concerns that it will threaten drinking water supplies. But Hess Corp. has permits either pending or recently approved for at least six wells along Wayne County's northwestern border, just outside the watershed boundary.
NEWS
October 26, 1997 | For The Inquirer / ELIZABETH ROBERTSON
Members of the Upper Maurice River Watershed Group survey the conditions at Scotland Run Park in Clayton. The group keeps tabs on the watershed and works to educate people about how to monitor the watersheds in their areas. During last Saturday's outing, Rich Gannon of Clayton (pointing) and Suzanne McCarthy of Franklinville (right) tell members of Cub Scout Pack 230 what to look for in streams and lakes. Pack members are, from front left, Nicholas Thomas, Jake Souber and Ben Thomas, all of Pennsville.
NEWS
June 20, 1996 | By Russell Gold, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Bucks County commissioners adopted a three-volume plan yesterday linking future development in the Little Neshaminy watershed with stormwater management. Although the vote came less than a week after parts of Lower Bucks were devastated by torrential rainfall, the timing was pure coincidence. The Little Neshaminy plan is part of the county's continuing efforts to control flooding. It examines how the area naturally drains rainwater. If any future development affects this natural system, the construction of a stormwater-retention basin will be required to collect and slow runoff.
NEWS
September 5, 1991 | By Nancy Petersen, Special to The Inquirer
Michael Jennings thinks the White Clay Creek is "one heck of a nice stream. " Jennings, a planner with the National Park Service, has more than a passing familiarity with a lot of nice streams all over the country, but none, he says, quite matches the feeling he gets from the White Clay. Even so, it will take an act of Congress before Jennings finds out exactly how nice the White Clay Creek watershed really is. That may happen soon. In July, bipartisan legislation was introduced in both houses of Congress that would direct the Secretary of the Interior to study the White Clay Creek of Pennsylvania and Delaware for possible inclusion in the National Wild and Scenic Rivers system.
NEWS
September 15, 2000 | By Jennifer Moroz, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Standing on the shores of scenic Batsto Lake in this historic Burlington County village, Department of Environmental Protection Commissioner Robert Shinn signed a contract yesterday to develop a plan to protect water resources in the heart of the Pinelands. Under the agreement, the state will give the Pinelands Commission $600,000 over four years to lead the project, which is aimed at ensuring the future health of waterways in the 570-square-mile drainage area known as the Mullica River Watershed Management Area.
NEWS
January 16, 2002 | By Jonathan Gelb INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Caught on the defensive after the release of a federal report indicating poor water quality in some Chester County streams, county commissioners pledged yesterday to increase efforts to improve stream water. At the weekly commissioners' meeting, county water authority officials gave a sobering overview of stream water health in a county known for its commitment to conservation. In Chester County, 276 of 1,300 total miles - about 21 percent - of streams do not meet state water quality standards, officials said.
NEWS
July 29, 1993 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
With the official blessings of 17 different government entities, a pact was signed Tuesday pledging that all will work as one on an unprecedented study of the entire White Clay Creek watershed. The study, conducted with the help of the National Park Service, will determine whether the stream qualifies for inclusion in the national wild and scenic river system. This marks the first time an entire watershed has been the object of such a study. The memorandum of understanding signed Tuesday was necessary to proceed with the study, because the cooperation of each government involved is required.
NEWS
July 31, 2007
The Green Woods Charter School in Upper Roxborough is scheduled to receive a Governor's Award for Environmental Excellence today. The charter school, on the grounds of the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education, was recognized for a year-long watershed study conducted by fourth graders. Kathleen McGinty, secretary of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, is scheduled to present the award. Green Woods was the only school among 12 organizations that won a Governor's Award for Environmental Excellence in 2007.
NEWS
September 19, 2000 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The White Clay Creek passed one of its final impediments yesterday in its slow but steady flow toward being designated part of the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. After approval by the Senate this year, the House of Representatives yesterday unanimously passed legislation approving the designation. "This has got to be the defining moment," said a jubilant Bob Cheyne, a London Britain Township supervisor. He and hundreds of other residents in the southern Chester County watershed have worked for more than 20 years to achieve the designation.
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