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Watershed

NEWS
August 28, 2011 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amid the preparations for Hurricane Irene, scientists are scrambling, too. But while most people are dreading the storm, the scientists are also on a geeky high, seeing it as a huge data-collection opportunity to better learn how to predict and withstand future storms. Rutgers University has two underwater vessels, stuffed with sensors, that will be sending back temperature, turbidity, and other data from far below the surface off the coast of New Jersey. At Temple University's Ambler campus, environmental science professor Laura Toran will be logging storm-water data, watching to see if parking-lot catchment systems do their jobs.
NEWS
August 4, 2011 | By Mohannad Sabry, McClatchy Newspapers
CAIRO - Bedridden and dressed in prison whites, gray hair poking through his familiar jet-black dye job, the 83-year-old ousted president of Egypt, Hosni Mubarak, made a stunning court appearance here Wednesday to answer charges of corruption and plotting to kill protesters who demanded his resignation. "I totally deny all charges," Mubarak said through a microphone. It was a watershed moment in modern Middle Eastern history: a seemingly invincible man who epitomized a generation of Arab autocrats, a stalwart U.S. ally who ruled unchecked for nearly 30 years over the most populous Arab nation, wheeled into a steel defendants' cage in a makeshift courtroom at a police academy that once bore his name.
NEWS
August 16, 2010 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
SCRANTON - An energy company is on track to drill the first natural gas production wells in northeastern Pennsylvania's Wayne County. Drilling in the Marcellus Shale formation is banned in nearly all of the county because it lies within the Delaware River watershed. The Delaware River Basin Commission recently declared a moratorium on drilling in the watershed, citing concerns that it will threaten drinking water supplies. But Hess Corp. has permits either pending or recently approved for at least six wells along Wayne County's northwestern border, just outside the watershed boundary.
NEWS
July 7, 2010
YORK, Pa. - Pennsylvania environmental officials say about 1,400 gallons of milk from a storage tank leaked into a central Pennsylvania creek. Department of Environmental Protection officials say the milk leaked from a storage tank at Rutter's Dairy in Manchester Township, York County, into a nearby stream on Monday. Department spokesman John Repetz said that no aquatic organisms were found dead in the waterway and that the milk dispersed by natural means. Repetz said a weld split open on a 30,000-gallon storage tank, and about 14,000 gallons got through foam insulation around the tank.
NEWS
January 5, 2010 | By Chelsea Conaboy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A New Jersey Assembly committee voted yesterday to shorten a proposed delay on water-quality rules that has irked environmental groups. The amended bill would give counties until next year to finish drafting a plan for limiting the zones in which sewer-line extensions will be permitted. The bill would suspend rules regulating, for the first time, how densely septic systems may be installed. The original bill and a Senate version had put the deadline in 2012. Environmental groups say the rules, approved in 2008, are needed now to protect the state's watersheds and control sprawl.
NEWS
December 31, 2009 | By Chelsea Conaboy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New Jersey environmental groups' celebration over new protections for water quality has turned to outrage as the Legislature considers a bill to delay new rules until 2012 or beyond. The state was working to put in place a comprehensive plan to protect water quality and regulate development in sensitive areas of watersheds - 15 years after the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ordered it to do so. But a proposal introduced this month in the Legislature, one that environmental groups say plays to developers, could postpone that plan by at least two more years and possibly thwart it altogether.
NEWS
September 6, 2009 | Story by Sandy Bauers, Photographs by Sharon Gekoski-Kimmel
LITITZ, Pa. - More than a decade ago, tiny Lititz Run in Lancaster County was a ribbon of fetid water that was too hot, too slow, and too poisoned by agricultural runoff to support trout for more than a few weeks. Then the community embraced its revival. Neighbors re-created wetlands. Farmers changed time-honored ways. Today Lititz Run is a rarity among waterways: a year-round trout stream that has won national accolades and been cited as a model. But as a tributary in the Susquehanna River watershed, Lititz Run still isn't clean enough, and it adds to the pollution that the Susquehanna sends downstream to the nutrient-choked Chesapeake Bay. Pennsylvania bears a huge responsibility for the despoiling of the bay. The Susquehanna, which drains half the state, pumps in 40 percent of the bay's nitrogen, largely from agriculture, and a gusher of its two other major pollutants - natural sediment and phosphorus from fertilizers and detergents - abetting the decline of the Chesapeake's celebrated fishing industry.
NEWS
September 4, 2009
STORY BY SANDY BAUERS PHOTOGRAPHS BY SHARON GEKOSKI-KIMMEL LITITZ, Pa. - More than a decade ago, tiny Lititz Run in Lancaster County was a ribbon of fetid water that was too hot, too slow, and too poisoned by agricultural runoff to support trout for more than a few weeks. Then the community embraced its revival. Neighbors re-created wetlands. Farmers changed time-honored ways. Today Lititz Run is a rarity among waterways: a year-round trout stream that has won national accolades and been cited as a model.
NEWS
February 14, 2008 | By Will Hobson FOR THE INQUIRER
"The water is 44 degrees, it's not getting any warmer, but the air temp is about 40, so the water should feel balmy. You probably won't want to come out," said Damon Sinclair, tongue placed firmly in cheek, over the loudspeakers at Brandywine Picnic Park on Saturday. Sinclair, the emcee of the Brandywine Valley Association's (BVA) inaugural "Make a Splash Polar Plunge" benefit, gave the 108 plungers a few last words Saturday morning before they charged down the sandy hill and into the chilly Brandywine Creek.
NEWS
February 7, 2008 | By Will Hobson FOR THE INQUIRER
On Saturday, dozens of (slightly nutty) friends of the Brandywine Valley Association will take a major plunge as they raise money to help protect the 330-square-mile watershed in Pennsylvania and Delaware. They will jump into a 50-foot-wide section of the frigid Brandywine Creek in the "Make a Splash Polar Plunge," bringing a version of the well-known polar bear clubs to Chester County. "It was my crazy idea," said Jim Jordan, managing director of the nonprofit conservation group that guards the watershed.
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