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Watershed

NEWS
June 21, 2002
FAIRMOUNT Park muffed at least part of its handling of a $26 million grant from the William Penn Foundation to restore its five watershed parks. But a recent collaboration of the city, the park and the Fairmount Park Conservancy has saved the environmental education programs at three environmental centers and shows how public-private partnerships can work. The Penn Foundation decided it could no longer could fund the jobs of five environmental educators hired under the Natural Lands Restoration and Environmental Education Program.
NEWS
April 9, 2002
IT'S BEEN A little more than a year since this Editorial Board began its investigation into the callous neglect and dispiriting conditions in Fairmount Park and other parks across the city. Since our series "Acres of Neglect" began, significant progress has been made in improving the parks. And yesterday's announcement that the series was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in editorial writing is, of course, professionally gratifying. But acres of work on the parks still remain.
NEWS
March 25, 2002 | By Wendy Ginsberg INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The sign: A tiny sow bug creeping along researcher Andy Duddleston's muddy fingertip. The meaning: Suburban sprawl and the runoff from fertilizers are affecting South Jersey's watersheds and water supply. Finding a sow bug in a Burlington County stream last week at Laurel Acres Park in Mount Laurel revealed that the water has a lot of room for improvement, Duddleston's colleague Chris Trainor said. With water levels dropping because of drought, many environmental groups are seizing the opportunity to inform residents about protecting what remains of the resource.
NEWS
March 13, 2002
As plants awake from one of the driest winters on record, 2002 is unlikely to be known as the year of lush fairways or soft carpets of lawn. Pennsylvania and New Jersey have had to declare drought emergencies alarmingly early in the year. Precipitation in the last 180 days is about half of what it should be. Stream, reservoir and groundwater levels are abnormally low. Unless a monsoon is in the offing, the squeeze will continue through the summer. New Jersey would need two inches of rain a week for the next five weeks to return to comfortable levels, says Bradley M. Campbell, commissioner of the state Department of Environmental Protection.
NEWS
January 18, 2002
AS CITY BUDGET time approaches, the Fairmount Park system has one less thing to worry about. One of the looming crises detailed in "Acres of Neglect" our editorial series about city parks, was that five volunteer coordinators - who are essential to implementing a grant to restore the parks' five watersheds - had not been funded beyond April of this year. The failure to ensure funding was emblematic of the problems of planning and advocacy that we found in park management. Now the Natural Lands Restoration & Environmental Education Program has gotten word that the city will pick up funding the positions.
NEWS
January 16, 2002 | By Jonathan Gelb INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Caught on the defensive after the release of a federal report indicating poor water quality in some Chester County streams, county commissioners pledged yesterday to increase efforts to improve stream water. At the weekly commissioners' meeting, county water authority officials gave a sobering overview of stream water health in a county known for its commitment to conservation. In Chester County, 276 of 1,300 total miles - about 21 percent - of streams do not meet state water quality standards, officials said.
NEWS
January 6, 2002 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Four of the Philadelphia region's 12 watersheds are among the most unhealthful in the country, according to a federal analysis of pollutants, wildlife and geology. The four are ranked six on a scale of one to six, with six being the worst - a dubious honor shared with just 28 other watersheds out of more than 2,200 in the United States. Don't rush to the store for bottled water just yet, however. The ratings from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reflect the water in rivers, lakes and streams, not the treated water coming out of the tap. Moreover, two of the region's biggest watersheds, those containing the Schuylkill and lower Delaware River, scored slightly better, with fours.
NEWS
May 17, 2001
In the catacomb beneath the Fairmount Water Works along the Schuylkill, it's all loose dirt, rough concrete, and planking under foot these days. Jackhammers provide the soundtrack. But in less than a year, visitors will move through the cool subterranean space along suspended walkways. Insulated from the city's hubbub by thick masonry, they'll peer at waters eerily lit by fiber optics. This warren of high-ceilinged rooms once held the pumps, flumes and turbines of the nation's first municipal water system.
NEWS
April 9, 2001 | By Michelle Jeffery INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Those tranquil streams you can hop across on a walk in the woods actually make up close to three-quarters of a watershed system, environmental experts say. "All these little finger streams are really the ones that you need to take care of," said Julie Kollar, chairwoman of Horsham Township's Environmental Advisory Board. And because 800 properties in Horsham have them, the township will hold a workshop to teach residents how to make sure the streams stay healthy. The Backyard Buffer workshop is scheduled for 7:30 p.m. April 18 in Hatboro-Horsham High School auditorium, 899 Horsham Rd. Maintaining a stream is easier than it sounds, said Nancy Minich, director of land planning and design for the Heritage Conservancy, which will present the program.
NEWS
April 4, 2001 | By Susan Weidener INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Peco Energy Co. was unaware that it was in an environmentally protected area when it plowed down trees and plants along its transmission line in the Valley Creek watershed, company officials said yesterday. The watershed area has been designated for years as being of exceptional value - the highest protection by the state Department of Environmental Protection, agency officials said. Peco officials say they didn't know. "We were not aware this area was designated as exceptional value," Michael Wood, a spokesman, said.
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