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Wawa

NEWS
January 14, 1990 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, Special to The Inquirer
It may be a tall order to fill, but Wawa Inc. hopes to achieve in the next 10 years what it has taken the company the last quarter-century to do. The Delaware County company whose structures have become part of the county landscape wants to more than double the number of its convenience stores by the end of the decade. Henry McHugh, vice president of operations, summed up the company's aim succinctly: "Our objective is to have 1,000 stores by the year 2000. " Increasing the number of stores from 465 to 1,000 in so short a time may seem highly ambitious, especially in a market that seems saturated with convenience-store chains.
BUSINESS
February 18, 1994 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wawa Inc. is planning a $30 million expansion of its dairy-processing, warehouse and distribution center in Middletown Delaware County. The dairy- and convenience-store operator has asked township officials for approval to expand its warehouse and plant, which processes milk and juice, at Valley Road and Route 1. The company also wants to move some parking and trucking operations to vacant pasture land across Valley Road from the plant. Vincent Anderson, Wawa's vice president and general counsel, said yesterday the expansion would take place over the next six years.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1999 | by Jim Nolan , Daily News Staff Writer
The Wawa strike ain't about to go away-way. The Delaware County dairy giant sought further restrictions on picketing outside its convenience stores yesterday as striking Teamsters expanded their job action into South Jersey and the five-county Philadelphia region. The moves were signs that both sides were no closer to resolving the contract overtime dispute that led 280 dairy drivers and warehouse workers of Locals 436 and 437 to go on strike late Sunday. Bob Ryder, secretary-treasurer of Local 436, said help from other unions enabled the Teamsters to expand picketing from 25 stores to 120 of the company's 550 outlets in the region.
NEWS
May 25, 1995 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Officials of Wawa Inc. will be honored with an award from the U.S. Labor Department this morning for their efforts to eliminate child-labor violations at their convenience stores. The company has developed a training and communication program to ensure compliance with the regulations, said Lori Bruce, Wawa public relations manager. As part of the apprentice program, employees who are 16 or 17 wear black smocks so managers know they cannot operate electric meat slicers or cardboard balers.
NEWS
December 3, 1992 | By John Way Jennings and Ed Engel, FOR THE INQUIRER
Police in Camden and Gloucester Counties are investigating a number of convenience store robberies during the last six weeks and have distributed a sketch of one robbery suspect. About 10 such robberies have occurred recently in Haddon Township, Deptford, Mantua and Woodlynne, most of them netting less than $100. Detective Thomas Fitzgerald of Haddon Township said police think at least two men are committing similiar holdups, mostly in Deptford Township. The first robbery occurred there at 10 a.m. Oct. 29 when a man wearing facial hair and glasses walked into the Wawa store on Route 45 and Ogden Station Road.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | By Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
Wawa's convenience stores apparently are tempting targets for accused robber Durango Anderson. Yesterday was the fourth time this month that Anderson, 21, of 18th Street near Diamond, has been arrested on charges of holding up a Wawa, police said. Since his first arrest on July 2, Anderson has been charged with robbing 11 of the all-night stores. Police said Anderson was charged with sticking up three Wawas since Friday - the day he was arraigned in robberies at several other Wawas.
NEWS
June 29, 1989 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
What's in a name? Despite Shakespeare's oft-quoted line, the folks at Wawa Inc. think that a Wawa by any other name smells of trade-name infringement. That's why the Delaware County dairy that now runs about 500 convenience stores in four states is seeking an order in federal court to stop a Delaware County developer from using the name of the historic village for its office condominium project. U.S. District Court Judge Louis H. Pollak has scheduled an injunction hearing for next Thursday in the case of Wawa Inc. v. Commons at Wawa Inc. Lawyers for Wawa Inc. contend that the word wawa - the Lenni Lenape Indians' word for the ubiquitous and noisy Canada goose - is so associated with their dairy and chain of stores that its use by any other company is "unfair competition" and an infringement on their trade name.
NEWS
September 30, 1999 | by Christine Bahls, Daily News Staff Writer
At 11:59 p.m. tonight, the contract between Wawa Inc. and the 300 or so drivers who take products from the Wawa distribution warehouse to its 550 stores expires. Both sides agree there are still major issues on the table. "We are hopeful we can reach a settlement," said Steven Wall, Wawa's chief negotiator, "but there are very substantial issues that need to be discussed. " "We have authorization to call a strike," said Bob Ryder, secretary treasurer of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Local 463. Ryder said one of the main issues involves pensions.
NEWS
August 28, 1986 | By Ruth Tallmadge, Special to The Inquirer
A proposed Wawa store in Frazer would pose a competitive threat, representatives of two nearby businesses told the East Whiteland Zoning Hearing Board, but the board chairman responded that it was not the board's function to prevent competition. At its meeting Monday, the board reviewed the application of Wawa Inc. for a new building on the northwestern corner of Planebrook Road and Route 30. John Hashem, the owner of John's Pizza next to the lot, said Wawa would carry 80 percent of what his store sells, except for pizza.
NEWS
May 17, 2007 | By Ed Mahon FOR THE INQUIRER
Ronnie Braverman is excited that he'll soon be able to pick up milk at the barn- and silo-shaped drive-through grocery store that's being built at Route 352 and Paoli Pike in East Goshen, but he's used to going to the Wawa next door out of "convenience and habit. " He stops at Wawa once a day; picks up a paper, a coffee, maybe milk on the way home from work; and usually runs into someone he knows. "It's almost like a ritual," said Braverman, 40, who three years ago moved to West Chester from Broomall, where Swiss Farm Stores are better known.
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