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NEWS
February 28, 2013 | BY ANGELO FICHERA, Daily News Staff Writerfichera@phillynews.com, 215-854-5913
THE DRIVER OF a bread truck that sat in a Southwest Philly Wawa parking lot for nearly 40 minutes wasn't delivering bread - but police say he had dough in mind. Police on Monday arrested Keith Jones, 55, of Kingsessing, on charges that he stole 513 gallons of diesel gas worth about $2,000 from the Wawa at Bartram and Island avenues Feb. 4. Jones, operating a Stroehmann bread delivery truck he'd purchased at auction about two weeks earlier, siphoned the gas from a station ground pump into a large storage tank, police said.
NEWS
February 18, 2013
Ah, democracy. Last month, I took in the Conshohocken Planning Commission hearing that was considering Wawa's application for a 4,000-square-foot gas and convenience store in the borough, at the unoccupied site of a former car dealership on Fayette Street. For two years, passions in the town have flared over the issue. Petitions have circulated for and against, voices have been raised and tears shed at normally sparsely attended public meetings, and there has even been a hilarious "We Want Wawa" Rage Against the Machinelike rock video posted on YouTube: You see free market retail rules all More than the roar of the crowd at a town hall.
NEWS
December 28, 2012 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THERE WAS no trumpet fanfare, no confetti thrown. When the new 7-Eleven opened Thursday at 10th and Filbert streets in Center City, passersby unfamiliar with the area would never know it was the store's first day of business, save for the sparkle of the countertops and a scribbled note taped to the door. That's partly because the convenience-store chain plans grand-opening celebrations a full month after actual openings, using the first month to fix glitches and get a feel for customers' buying habits.
BUSINESS
November 1, 2012
About 100 shuttered Wawa stores have reopened over the past 24 hours, the convenience store chain said Wednesday, leaving only 81 of the company's 601 locations off-line due to storm-related problems. Most of the affected stores were in central and South Jersey, and a few in the Montgomery County area, spokeswoman Lori Bruce reported around lunchtime. Power outages forced the closure of several hundred Wawas as Hurricane Sandy slammed the New Jersey coast. "Once power is restored, our teams will move quickly to restock and open the stores to serve the community," Bruce said.
BUSINESS
November 1, 2012 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
  For a convenience-store chain that takes the postal-carrier mantra to the retailing extreme - on the job in any weather, plus holidays - what happened to Wawa in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy can be called a crisis of unprecedented scope. Nearly a third of Wawa's 601 stores - 194 in all - were without power during the day Tuesday, most of them closed and in areas most affected by hobbled utility systems in New Jersey, Southeastern Pennsylvania, and Delaware. While Wawa was not alone in its struggle - Giant Food Stores said 33 of its supermarkets in the Philadelphia suburbs and as far west as Reading were open but subsisting on generators and ice-packed trucks in parking lots - Wawa's troubles were acutely startling.
NEWS
October 31, 2012 | By Maria Panaritis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For a convenience-store chain that takes the postal-carrier mantra to the retailing extreme - on the job in any weather, plus holidays - what happened to Wawa in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy can be called a crisis of unprecedented scope. Nearly a third of Wawa's 601 stores - 194 in all - were without power Tuesday, most of them closed and in areas most affected by hobbled utility systems in New Jersey, Southeastern Pennsylvania, and Delaware. While Wawa was not alone in its struggle - Giant Food Stores said 33 of its supermarkets in the Philadelphia suburbs and as far west as Reading were open but subsisting on generators and ice-packed trucks in parking lots - Wawa's troubles were acutely startling.
NEWS
August 10, 2012
Wawa has paid $12,500 to a Cumberland County man to settle claims that he was improperly denied service at a company store while accompanied by his service dog, state authorities announced Wednesday. Patrick Stark, 33, went to a Wawa store in Millville, where he lives, on June 13 to buy a sandwich, and was told he would not be served unless he took his dog outside. The self-employed glass artist explained that the animal, a Queensland heeler wearing special tags, was permitted in the store by law, but a store manager told him to leave.
NEWS
July 20, 2012
James John Hvizda, who had pleaded guilty to first-degree murder charges for stabbing his estranged wife to death in the parking lot of a Wawa store in Upper Uwchlan, now says he wants to go to trial. During a sentencing hearing Thursday before President Judge James P. MacElree II, Hvizda said he wanted to withdraw his plea and take his chances at trial, even if it meant the death sentence rather than accepting the prosecution's offer of a life sentence without parole. MacElree said a hearing would be scheduled within 10 days on the plea withdrawal.
BUSINESS
July 20, 2012 | Joe DiStefano
Florida Gov. Rick Scott and Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer joined Wawa Inc. bosses Howard Stoeckel and Chris Gheysens Wednesday for the opening of the Delaware County-based chain's first store in the Sunshine State, a quick-turnover smokes-and-Cokes, gas-and-hoagies outlet drawing homesick Philadelphia expatriates and curious natives to Orlando's Central Florida Parkway. Wawa says it will "penetrate" central Florida between now and late August with two more stores in Orlando and two in nearby Kissimmee, with later sites planned for the Tampa area.
BUSINESS
June 30, 2012 | By Maria Panaritis and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For years, it seemed, Wawa couldn't get out of Center City fast enough. With growing ambitions, the stalwart convenience-store chain ditched site after site over the last decade as it fixated on bodacious locations on more land than could be found in a dense downtown. As the popular purveyor of hoagies, cigarettes, and coffee vacated old haunts across walkable Philadelphia to reinvent itself as a glorified sandwich spot, its departures were greeted with dismay, even anger, among residents who felt abandoned by a beloved hometown chain.
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