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Wax Museum

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NEWS
February 19, 2013 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
ROBERT AVERY, the founder and president of the Philadelphia Wax Museum, admits that people often get the wrong idea about his museum: They think it actually exists. Type "Philadelphia Wax Museum" into Google and you might reach the same conclusion - that it's a real place with wax figures of real Philadelphians, from Betsy Ross to Bill Cosby. Why? For starters, the news release says so. "Our museum offers veterans a 30 percent discount on admission," Avery is quoted as saying in a release announcing that the museum is "a reality.
NEWS
January 29, 1999 | By Herbert Lowe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Over the last two years, the d'Zert Club has taken 2,500 people from the Philadelphia area to the nation's first and largest black wax museum, Great Blacks in Wax in Baltimore. Each time they went, they saw a room dedicated to famous African Americans from Maryland. Soon, thanks to the group's effort, they will be able to take in the Pennsylvania room at Great Blacks in Wax. The museum last year permitted the d'Zert Club to commission a life-size figure of a famous black Pennsylvanian over each of the next five years.
NEWS
August 17, 1998 | By John Woestendiek, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It has no audio, no video, no computer animation. It is not located amid boutiques and galleries, by a Planet Hollywood, Hooters, or Hard Rock Cafe. It's not even part of Baltimore's lively, upscale, ain't-life-peachy Inner Harbor. Nor does the Great Blacks in Wax Museum particularly want to be. Instead, it is two miles and a world away from the beaten tourist path - on a street with boarded-up rowhouses, down-and-out loiterers, and peel-and-stick advertisements for defense lawyers on its parking meters: "Busted?
NEWS
May 18, 1996 | YONG KIM / DAILY NEWS
The Rev. Leon Sullivan takes a look at a life-size wax statue of himself that was unveiled last night at Zion Baptist Church, where he was known as the "Lion of Zion" during 38 years as pastor. The statue of Sullivan, who now heads the International Foundation for Education and Self-Help, was created for the Great Blacks in Wax Museum in Baltimore.
NEWS
December 5, 1993 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
Don't go flaunting your best jewelry just yet, but Times Square in New York reports progress in its battle to reduce street crime and make itself safer for the throngs of visitors drawn by its glitter and raw-edged bustle. Crime dropped 24 percent in May through July, according to police statistics compiled by the Times Square Business Improvement District. Still, there were more than 1,000 criminal incidents, but the decline seemed to reflect efforts by businesses, police and the court system to improve conditions.
NEWS
August 23, 1988 | By Amy Linn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ol' Ben's lost his head. "Yup, Ben Franklin is history," says Steve Meyer, building manager of the Forney Transportation Museum in downtown Denver. On Wednesday, bandits broke into the Forney's wax museum and ran off with the heads of Ben Franklin and the lesser-known William MacLeod Raine (writer of rip-roaring Westerns). Going West, young man, has its perils. The museum has posted a reward: $500 for information leading to the capture and conviction of the marauders, who also made off with a skull used in part of the "Colorado Maneater" exhibit.
LIVING
July 24, 1999 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The guitar that George Harrison played on a London rooftop during the Beatles' final performance 30 years ago is expected to fetch more than $320,000 at an auction Aug. 19. "It is incredibly important. It is the one Beatles guitar to have come up for such a long time," said Sarah Allen, a spokeswoman for the London auction house Bonhams. The custom-made rosewood Fender Telecaster was commissioned by classic rock guitar-maker Leo Fender as a gift to Harrison in 1968. Harrison used it in recording the Beatles' "Let It Be" album and film.
NEWS
February 2, 1999 | By Acel Moore
There he was, Cecil B. Moore, fiery criminal attorney, civil rights leader and city councilman in silk suit, looking confident and holding his ever-present cigar, standing tall in a room at The Inquirer Building on Friday night. Of course it was not really Moore - he died 20 years ago this month - but a wax figure being unveiled at a reception. The sculpture, commissioned by the d'Zert Club, a local organization devoted to teaching history and culture to African American youth, will be housed in the Great Blacks in Wax museum in Baltimore.
TRAVEL
February 18, 2013 | By Philippa J. Chaplin, Inquirer Travel Editor
After the first of the year, I had the opportunity to visit Baltimore. I say opportunity because I had long thought of it as a harbor and a tunnel to D.C., not a   real   city like Philadelphia. So, when I learned I would be going to Baltimore to celebrate the 105th anniversary of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc.'s founding, I was eager to see the city. I took the train from 30th Street Station and arrived about 8 p.m. on a Thursday. When I left Philly, people were walking around downtown, coming and going.
LIVING
April 9, 1997 | By Jeff Gammage, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Frederick Douglass is here. So is author Richard Wright. And astronaut Guion Bluford. Malcolm X is standing across the hall from Martin Luther King. You can walk up and look them in the eye. But don't shake their hands. They'll break. Here, in an old city fire station in a rough part of town, the great, near-great and oft-forgotten of African American history are forever acting out their struggles within the walls of the nation's first black wax museum, Great Blacks in Wax. It's a quirky, popular addition to a town that already features museums devoted to dentistry, firefighting and light bulbs, not to mention Babe Ruth.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 19, 2013 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
ROBERT AVERY, the founder and president of the Philadelphia Wax Museum, admits that people often get the wrong idea about his museum: They think it actually exists. Type "Philadelphia Wax Museum" into Google and you might reach the same conclusion - that it's a real place with wax figures of real Philadelphians, from Betsy Ross to Bill Cosby. Why? For starters, the news release says so. "Our museum offers veterans a 30 percent discount on admission," Avery is quoted as saying in a release announcing that the museum is "a reality.
TRAVEL
February 18, 2013 | By Philippa J. Chaplin, Inquirer Travel Editor
After the first of the year, I had the opportunity to visit Baltimore. I say opportunity because I had long thought of it as a harbor and a tunnel to D.C., not a   real   city like Philadelphia. So, when I learned I would be going to Baltimore to celebrate the 105th anniversary of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc.'s founding, I was eager to see the city. I took the train from 30th Street Station and arrived about 8 p.m. on a Thursday. When I left Philly, people were walking around downtown, coming and going.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2011 | By Nicole Pensiero, For The Inquirer
David Wax says there are plenty of things that set his band's music apart, most noticeably the use of Mexican instruments such the quijada - a donkey's jawbone complete with teeth that, despite its jarring appearance, provides an oddly appealing buzzing noise. "We're always striving to integrate and weave Mexican folk into our music, but it's not glaring in our overall sound," the 30-year-old Boston-based musician says. Still, he notes that the quijada - played by his musical partner, singer/fiddler Suz Slezak - and a guitar-like jarana, which Wax mastered during his many visits to Mexico, are "obvious markers" that something unique is happening sonically.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2006 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report. Send e-mail to gensleh@phillynews.com
ALTHOUGH IT has been the No.1 movie two weeks running, the true measure of the success of "Borat" may actually be found in the number of individuals and organizations who hate it. Or want a piece of it. There are the Kazakhs, who are furious at the way the film depicts them; the Turkish Web site creator who claims the character is based on him; the Jews who say the film's anti-Semitism will not be seen as the satire it's intended to be,...
LIVING
July 24, 1999 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The guitar that George Harrison played on a London rooftop during the Beatles' final performance 30 years ago is expected to fetch more than $320,000 at an auction Aug. 19. "It is incredibly important. It is the one Beatles guitar to have come up for such a long time," said Sarah Allen, a spokeswoman for the London auction house Bonhams. The custom-made rosewood Fender Telecaster was commissioned by classic rock guitar-maker Leo Fender as a gift to Harrison in 1968. Harrison used it in recording the Beatles' "Let It Be" album and film.
NEWS
February 2, 1999 | By Acel Moore
There he was, Cecil B. Moore, fiery criminal attorney, civil rights leader and city councilman in silk suit, looking confident and holding his ever-present cigar, standing tall in a room at The Inquirer Building on Friday night. Of course it was not really Moore - he died 20 years ago this month - but a wax figure being unveiled at a reception. The sculpture, commissioned by the d'Zert Club, a local organization devoted to teaching history and culture to African American youth, will be housed in the Great Blacks in Wax museum in Baltimore.
NEWS
January 29, 1999 | By Herbert Lowe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Over the last two years, the d'Zert Club has taken 2,500 people from the Philadelphia area to the nation's first and largest black wax museum, Great Blacks in Wax in Baltimore. Each time they went, they saw a room dedicated to famous African Americans from Maryland. Soon, thanks to the group's effort, they will be able to take in the Pennsylvania room at Great Blacks in Wax. The museum last year permitted the d'Zert Club to commission a life-size figure of a famous black Pennsylvanian over each of the next five years.
NEWS
August 17, 1998 | By John Woestendiek, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It has no audio, no video, no computer animation. It is not located amid boutiques and galleries, by a Planet Hollywood, Hooters, or Hard Rock Cafe. It's not even part of Baltimore's lively, upscale, ain't-life-peachy Inner Harbor. Nor does the Great Blacks in Wax Museum particularly want to be. Instead, it is two miles and a world away from the beaten tourist path - on a street with boarded-up rowhouses, down-and-out loiterers, and peel-and-stick advertisements for defense lawyers on its parking meters: "Busted?
LIVING
April 9, 1997 | By Jeff Gammage, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Frederick Douglass is here. So is author Richard Wright. And astronaut Guion Bluford. Malcolm X is standing across the hall from Martin Luther King. You can walk up and look them in the eye. But don't shake their hands. They'll break. Here, in an old city fire station in a rough part of town, the great, near-great and oft-forgotten of African American history are forever acting out their struggles within the walls of the nation's first black wax museum, Great Blacks in Wax. It's a quirky, popular addition to a town that already features museums devoted to dentistry, firefighting and light bulbs, not to mention Babe Ruth.
NEWS
May 18, 1996 | YONG KIM / DAILY NEWS
The Rev. Leon Sullivan takes a look at a life-size wax statue of himself that was unveiled last night at Zion Baptist Church, where he was known as the "Lion of Zion" during 38 years as pastor. The statue of Sullivan, who now heads the International Foundation for Education and Self-Help, was created for the Great Blacks in Wax Museum in Baltimore.
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