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Wayne Junction

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BUSINESS
November 15, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Wayne Junction railroad station, straddling the line between Germantown and Nicetown, was once one of Philadelphia's gateways to the larger world. Constructed in 1901 by the Reading Railroad, the station offered service to New York City, Washington, and points west during its heyday and, according to SEPTA, advertised that "more trains stop here than at any other station in the world. " The Baltimore & Ohio Railroad stopped offering passenger service from Wayne Junction to major cities in 1958.
NEWS
April 28, 2011 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Under a decaying ceiling and not far from a collapsed roof, SEPTA and city officials on Thursday collected $4 million from the Obama administration to help rebuild the 110-year-old Wayne Junction rail station in Germantown. Federal Transit Administrator Peter Rogoff handed over a mock check for $3.98 million, saying the Wayne Junction project is "long, long overdue. " "To attract new riders, transit needs to be clean, safe, reliable and desireable," Rogoff said. The dilapidated Wayne Junction station, once a destination of the Reading Railroad's "Crusader" to New York and its "Royal Blue" to Baltimore, is none of the four.
NEWS
April 29, 2011 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Under a decaying ceiling in the ticket office, next to peeling paint and not far from a collapsed roof, SEPTA and local officials collected $4 million from the Obama administration on Thursday to help rebuild the 110-year-old Wayne Junction rail station in Germantown. Federal Transit Administrator Peter Rogoff handed over a mock check for $3.98 million, saying the Wayne Junction project was "long, long overdue. " "To attract new riders, transit needs to be clean, safe, reliable, and desirable," Rogoff said.
NEWS
July 7, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin and Justine McDaniel, STAFF WRITERS
Jammed platforms. Brutal delays. Passengers left stranded as packed-to-capacity trains sped past. And, because some people were likely off Tuesday for the holiday, things will probably get worse, especially for riders from inner-ring suburbs who will have to contend with the most crowded trains. "It could be a little worse tomorrow," said Jeff Knueppel, SEPTA's general manager, during a news conference Tuesday. "I wish I didn't feel that way but I've got to say it. " And the problems could last all summer, officials said, because they don't know whether a temporary weld can get the trains back in service until new beams are installed.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
In another era, SEPTA's proposal to build a power plant in an industrial complex near its Wayne Junction station might have attracted little attention. SEPTA says the project, which would power most of the transit agency's northern Regional Rail system, will keep its trains running in case of a Peco blackout. It also says the $26.8 million plant will save money, and require no outlay for the cash-strapped agency. But SEPTA's proposed power plant would be fueled by natural gas, which despite its clean-burning attributes has become a lightning rod for anti-fossil-fuel activists.
NEWS
June 15, 2012 | By Inquirer staff
SEPTA's Regional Rail trains are running up to 45 minutes late because of power problems. The Fox Chase line was shut down entirely for nearly an hour, after the problems started around 5 p.m., in the middle of the day's peak rush from Center City. A SEPTA spokesman said the problem was apparently caused by downed wires near 16th Street Junction, between the North Broad and Wayne Junction stations, which triggered electrical problems at the Wayne Junction electrical substation, which provides power for the trains.
NEWS
November 15, 1991 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
Thousands of rush-hour commuters were stranded this morning during the height of the rush hour when a section of overhead wires at the Wayne Junction in Germantown suddenly fell, halting service on six SEPTA commuter rail lines. The lines affected were Warminster, West Trenton, Lansdale-Doylestown, Norristown, Chestnut Hill East and Fox Chase. There was no immediate explanation for the downed wires, which affected travel both to and from Suburban Sation and the Market East stations in Center City.
NEWS
June 20, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia area will get $12.8 million in federal funding that was sought to help renovate an aging SEPTA power substation and repair 11 highway and railroad bridges. The grants from the U.S. Department of Transportation were announced Tuesday by U.S. Sen. Bob Casey and U.S. Reps. Allyson Y. Schwartz and Chaka Fattah, all Pennsylvania Democrats. The Wayne Junction power substation provides electricity to operate half of SEPTA's Regional Rail system, and the 1920s-vintage facility has been a source of frequent failures in recent years.
NEWS
June 21, 2016
A story Monday about the Amish girls and woman found living with a Bucks County man wrongly described the number of girls described as "gifted" to him by Daniel and Savilla Stoltzfus. Only one daughter has been so described. A photo caption Monday on a planned natural-gas power plant in Wayne Junction misstated the role of a SEPTA electrical substation nearby. The plant, if built, would replace Peco as the source of power going through the substation.
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NEWS
July 7, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin and Justine McDaniel, STAFF WRITERS
Jammed platforms. Brutal delays. Passengers left stranded as packed-to-capacity trains sped past. And, because some people were likely off Tuesday for the holiday, things will probably get worse, especially for riders from inner-ring suburbs who will have to contend with the most crowded trains. "It could be a little worse tomorrow," said Jeff Knueppel, SEPTA's general manager, during a news conference Tuesday. "I wish I didn't feel that way but I've got to say it. " And the problems could last all summer, officials said, because they don't know whether a temporary weld can get the trains back in service until new beams are installed.
NEWS
June 21, 2016
A story Monday about the Amish girls and woman found living with a Bucks County man wrongly described the number of girls described as "gifted" to him by Daniel and Savilla Stoltzfus. Only one daughter has been so described. A photo caption Monday on a planned natural-gas power plant in Wayne Junction misstated the role of a SEPTA electrical substation nearby. The plant, if built, would replace Peco as the source of power going through the substation.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
In another era, SEPTA's proposal to build a power plant in an industrial complex near its Wayne Junction station might have attracted little attention. SEPTA says the project, which would power most of the transit agency's northern Regional Rail system, will keep its trains running in case of a Peco blackout. It also says the $26.8 million plant will save money, and require no outlay for the cash-strapped agency. But SEPTA's proposed power plant would be fueled by natural gas, which despite its clean-burning attributes has become a lightning rod for anti-fossil-fuel activists.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A growing problem with lateness on the Regional Rail lines in the last year is driving SEPTA to make big changes to its schedule, agency officials said Wednesday. Those changes will begin Sunday throughout SEPTA's Regional Rail network, but the biggest adjustments will be on the Warminster and West Trenton Lines. Those lines will now terminate at 30th Street Station instead of at Philadelphia International Airport. There also will be a new, shortened Airport Line. West Trenton Line trains were on time 76 percent of the time in October, officials said.
BUSINESS
November 15, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Wayne Junction railroad station, straddling the line between Germantown and Nicetown, was once one of Philadelphia's gateways to the larger world. Constructed in 1901 by the Reading Railroad, the station offered service to New York City, Washington, and points west during its heyday and, according to SEPTA, advertised that "more trains stop here than at any other station in the world. " The Baltimore & Ohio Railroad stopped offering passenger service from Wayne Junction to major cities in 1958.
NEWS
August 19, 2015
ISSUE | DISCRIMINATION On knowing when to say 'Aye, aye' A county clerk refuses to issue marriage licenses to gay couples - in other words, to do her job. She is fired and ends up on the talk-show circuit, wailing and crying about how she was discriminated against because the state expected her to fulfill her properly constituted function. It reminds me that back when I was in the Navy, we had a disbursing clerk, or "DK," who refused to make payments to some sailors. Our DK thought the payments were improper even though they were authorized by rules set down by Congress - that is, by people who were way above his pay grade.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA on Friday celebrated an accomplishment that took 15 years, cost about $50 million, and is virtually invisible to its Regional Rail passengers. Crews installed a plaqueonthe overhead catenary wires by the Wallingford station marking the installation of 150 miles of new wiring to reduce train delays and improve performance. Catenary wires provide electric power to run Regional Rail trains over the system's 280 miles of track. Friday was a rare chance for SEPTA workers like lineman first class Bernie Shine, 49, of Collingswood, to bask in the limelight.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Red tape? Wayne Mills Co. Inc. thrives on it. Not the torturous-regulation kind, but the thin woven ties behind the expression "cut through the red tape. " Last year, Wayne Mills supplied more than 100,000 yards of it, used mostly in courthouses and law offices to bind official documents. The 104-year-old North Philadelphia weaver of narrow fabrics has had that line of business since the 1940s. Not that this manufacturer of rare longevity is a one-trick loom. Housed in a redbrick complex with Southern yellow pine floors and wood-beam ceilings across the tracks from SEPTA's Wayne Junction station, Wayne Mills exists now - into the sixth generation of its founding family, the Milneses - because, like the yarn it weaves, it has remained pliable.
REAL_ESTATE
March 31, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
I can easily gauge whether a column has struck a nerve by the number of e-mails waiting for me when I get home from church on Sunday. The topic this time was: Where are retiring baby boomers going to live, and why is no one building houses they want and can afford? Reader Claire Gawinowicz of Oreland had broached the question, and I put in my two cents. Nearly 120 readers e-mailed and called in the ensuing five days with their opinions. Here are some of them: "I thought I was the only boomer looking to downsize and having a great deal of difficulty finding something that we can comfortably afford and still be able to enjoy our retirement," said Isabel Day Jones of West Chester.
NEWS
August 16, 2012 | BY PHILLIP LUCAS, Daily News Staff Writer
AS SEPTA POLICE responded to reports of a burglary at the Wayne Junction train yard and a bus accident involving an injured pedestrian in the eastern edge of Fox Chase early Wednesday morning, a woman fell onto the train tracks at the Lombard-South station, touched an electrified rail and died, officials said. A surveillance camera recorded the unidentified woman, 30, entering the track area at 2:19 a.m., according to SEPTA. She lay there until just after 5 a.m., when she was hit by the first train to arrive at the station, said Jerri Williams, a SEPTA spokeswoman.
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