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Wayne Junction

NEWS
May 26, 2010 | By MICHELLE SKOWRONEK, skowrom@phillynews.com 215-854-5926
Overnight security at SEPTA rail yards - which might have prevented an 11-year-old boy from being electrocuted Saturday - ended about 10 years ago. Wayne Junction in Germantown, where Jewels Angelo was killed when he touched an electrified mechanism atop a SEPTA train car, used to be guarded 24 hours a day, said David Waters, a former SEPTA security officer who patrolled that area in the 1990s. Patrols could have saved Angelo's life, Waters said. "If [the rail yard] had security, they would have seen the kids running down the yard," he said.
NEWS
May 24, 2010
An 11-year-old boy was found dead on the SEPTA tracks at the Wayne Junction car yard Sunday morning. SEPTA spokeswoman Jerri Williams said the boy's body was found about 8:30 a.m. by a SEPTA employee. The yard is usually used to store Regional Rail cars that are not in use, she said. "It appears that he was electrocuted," Williams said. "When that happened and how that occurred are still being investigated now. " SEPTA investigators and Philadelphia police are investigating, Williams said.
NEWS
February 17, 2010 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's the longest city bus route in America, SEPTA boasts, and for the last week, it has been even longer. Snow-related detours remained in effect yesterday on SEPTA's Route 23, elongating the rambling 14-mile run from the top of Germantown Avenue in Chestnut Hill to Oregon Avenue in South Philadelphia with three short jogs. Although detours came and went throughout the day as front-end loaders bit into snowbanks to open impassable streets, there were still about 130 detours on 58 bus lines across the city and inner suburbs yesterday.
NEWS
May 9, 2007 | By Matthew Mitchell
The news that on-time performance for SEPTA's commuter trains has finally climbed above 90 percent is a prime example of the "glass half-empty/glass half-full" dilemma. The 2006 figure represents real progress for a system that just a few years ago had the worst on-time performance in the country. But SEPTA still lags its peers in this and other aspects of service quality that matter most to passengers. The industry standard for on-time performance is the percentage of trains reaching their destinations within five minutes of the scheduled time.
NEWS
July 25, 2006 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While it will be months before federal investigators' final report on the cause of the July 1 head-on collision of two Regional Rail trains, SEPTA officials already know what one safety demand will be. "I can tell you unequivocally that they will recommend a train-control system - cab signals," said Patrick Nowakowski, director of SEPTA operations. Cab signals are safety devices that, through a combination of on-train signals and automatic braking, trim the chances of collisions and minimize the harm when accidents do occur.
NEWS
November 4, 2005 | By Julie Stoiber INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A glorious morning. An errand in town. SEPTA's C bus sidelined by the strike. Time for South Philadelphia retiree Bonnie Walker to christen the Schwinn she bought this summer. Dressed head to toe in yellow, with a messenger bag over her shoulder, she finished fussing at the Water Department over her bill yesterday and headed home, weaving among walkers on a wide swath of sidewalk south of City Hall. "That little ride up and back, I just feel so good," said Walker, 55. "It's working for me. " For lots of others, too. With the walkout testing the resourcefulness of stranded transit riders, many are relying on two wheels and their own steam.
NEWS
December 4, 2003 | By Michael Currie Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A four-alarm fire tore through a Nicetown flower warehouse yesterday afternoon, gutting the building and bringing a commuter rail line to a halt. The fire broke out shortly after 1 p.m. at the Pennock Wholesale Florist warehouse - a major supplier for Philadelphia florists - in the 3000 block of Stokley Street, said Executive Fire Chief Bill Brightcliffe. No one was injured. By 2:20, more than 100 firefighters were on the scene. Because firefighters had stretched hoses across rail lines adjacent to the warehouse, trains on SEPTA's R8 Chestnut Hill West line were suspended.
NEWS
November 16, 2002 | By Frederick Cusick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A power outage knocked out service to all of SEPTA's regional commuter trains for about 2 1/2 hours yesterday, stranding thousands of riders during the evening rush. SEPTA said the failure occurred about 5:45 p.m. at a distribution center at Wayne Junction in North Philadelphia that services the entire Regional Rail network. Transit agency spokesman Richard Maloney said the failure was an example of "Murphy's law" at work. Some trains ended up being stuck between stations at a time of high volume, he said.
NEWS
September 10, 2002 | By Jere Downs INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Todd Grashaw boarded a Regional Rail train at 7:50 a.m. yesterday in Fort Washington, but he and fellow passengers did not arrive in Center City until 12:15 p.m. They were among thousands of morning commuters who were waylaid as SEPTA coped with downed wires, followed by signal glitches and a temporary failure of its entire computerized train-control system. "We just kept stopping," Grashaw said of his four-car, R5 train that was three-quarters full of passengers. At one point, the train was delayed for two hours at the Wayne Junction station in North Philadelphia, providing several passengers a much-needed bathroom break, he added.
NEWS
May 31, 2001 | By Margie Fishman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Bill Michuda used to find it charming to hear the trains pulling into Jenkintown station behind his home on the 100 block of Runnymede Avenue. That was before SEPTA erected a storage and work yard just north of the station, where, Michuda contends, SEPTA employees operate heavy machinery into the wee hours, throw beer bottles into his backyard, illegally ride their orange trucks on nearby streets, and cloud the air with diesel fumes. Michuda, along with other members of the West Jenkintown Association, believed the issue was resolved about 10 years ago when the community group persuaded SEPTA to relocate the operation to Wayne Junction in Philadelphia.
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