CollectionsWealth
IN THE NEWS

Wealth

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
August 5, 2013 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Knowing yourself may top the list of skills you'll need in order to recognize bad financial advice. Even guidance that is generally good may be ruinous in your particular life circumstances. Popular, but wrong, is how Reuters columnist Linda Stern describes such advice as "Don't take a mortgage into retirement with you" and "Never borrow against your 401(k). " In the case of the mortgage, recent low interest rates mean a refinanced mortgage could be an inexpensive source of cash for retirement expenses or for an investment that would earn more interest than the mortgage costs.
NEWS
April 22, 1988 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lahdi Moutchia's miracle windfall - a $34,757 bank error in her favor - bought her a house in Camden and a car. It must have been fun while it lasted. Moutchia's house in the 1100 block of North 34th Street has been listed for sale, and a Superior Court judge in Camden yesterday ordered that the proceeds from the sale be deposited in an escrow account. The situation that led to her problems began Dec. 7, when she looked at her statement from the Midlantic National Bank/South.
NEWS
March 13, 1986 | By Dan Rottenberg, Inquirer Contributing Writer
Every sixth grader knows that if you build a better mousetrap, the world will beat a path to your door. Thus it should follow that anyone who wants to get rich ought to concentrate on making better mousetraps. Well, surprise. A recent study by the Federal Reserve Board implies that if you want the world to beat a path to your door nowadays, you should forget about improving the mousetrap and think instead about improving the path. Today's real wealth-building opportunities, according to the Fed, won't be found in productive enterprises like manufacturing, construction, oil refining or farming.
LIVING
March 2, 1986 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lorraine Neff got the Big News by phone. She was a 21-year-old schoolteacher then, living in West Philadelphia and earning about $9,000 a year. "Your mother and I think you ought to know," said her father, that he was now giving her a large block of shares in his prosperous manufacturing company - shares that would ultimately be worth several million dollars. "I was totally unaware of my own wealth," she recalled over lunch at a Center City restaurant recently, and shook her head.
NEWS
July 9, 2007 | By Jonah Goldberg
What if humanity disappeared tomorrow? According to Alan Weisman, author of The World Without Us, in an interview with Scientific American, nature would reclaim the planet awfully quickly. In the event of an ecumenical rapture or a 12 Monkeys-style plague, Manhattan's suppressed underground rivers would quickly reclaim the Big Apple's core; mosquitoes would thrive; feral cats would rule the roost; and the Statue of Liberty would wait for an enraged Charlton Heston who, like Godot, would never arrive.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2011 | By Hope Yen, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The wealth gaps between whites and minorities have grown to their widest levels in a quarter-century. The overall gap between rich and poor also widened, according to an analysis of census data. The Pew Research Center's Social & Demographic Trends project looked at U.S. Census data and found that the recession and uneven recovery had erased decades of minority gains, leaving whites on average with 20 times the net worth of blacks and 18 times that of Hispanics. The analysis offers the most direct government evidence yet of the disparity between predominantly younger minorities, whose main asset is their home, and older whites, who are more likely to have 401(k)
NEWS
May 26, 1991 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary Curtis is getting ready to give it all away. Five decades of hard work as a doctor, five decades of owning homes that were bought cheap and sold expensive, five decades of saving money so that now the nest egg is measured in the hundreds of thousands of dollars. Her two children and two grandchildren already have been showered with gifts. Down payments have been made on houses. Two generations of college tuitions have been footed. Trips have been bankrolled to Australia, Hawaii and Japan.
NEWS
March 18, 1986
I reply to David O'Reilly's March 2 article on inherited wealth, in which I was quoted. While it is true and, I think, useful for us to understand that wealth does not of itself bring happiness and does bring its own particular kinds of difficulties and challenges, there is more. The root of the isolation, confusion and guilt that plague owning-class people is the same as the root of the difficulties and challenges faced by working-class people: an economic system that is based on acquisition by a few from the productivity of the majority.
NEWS
January 24, 2006 | By Acel Moore
On Jan. 15 at Bryn Mawr College, Acel Moore addressed the Main Line Martin Luther King Association. An excerpt: The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s vision of America, a nation in which character would be the test of an individual's worth, not only remains unfulfilled but will probably stay that way well into the 21st century. Yes, a younger generation of blacks and other "people of color" have never experienced the humiliation of Jim Crow laws, have never witnessed segregation, have always had an opportunity to vote.
NEWS
April 24, 2000
Ancient truth: Capitalism creates winners, big time, but it also creates losers, without remorse. This was a truth ignored by many during the recent dot-com frenzy. Some of them should have known better; some simply were too young to have the scars that breed wisdom. The recent hemorrhage of paper wealth on Wall Street was a heck of a lesson in Capitalism 101 for young whizzes who - like so many before them - thought their generation was so brilliant, so blessed, so ahead of the curve that the ancient rules had been waived.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 4, 2016
By Rebecca S. Fahrlander Taking a break between high school and university - a gap year - has been trending in recent years. Prince William famously took a gap year to travel and volunteer for worthy causes. More recently, Malia Obama decided to postpone entering university for a year. The gap year offers an opportunity to make a transition between two stages of a young life - taking a break from formal education and substituting the informal learning from travel and work in the so-called real world.
NEWS
April 15, 2016
DEAR ABBY: I'm a 29-year-old self-made millionaire who has spent the last decade saving and investing my middle-class income. I grew up dirt poor, so at 18, I left home with $5, went straight to work, and never looked back. Recently, I've realized that I struggle to make friends for fear they'll find out about my financial situation. Those who know only want to talk about money, or they treat me differently. Most of my peers are broke, and it makes me feel guilty. Those with high incomes blow their money on fancy dinners and luxury vehicles.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2016
Immigration attorney Emily M. Cohen, along with her three senior legal assistants, has joined the immigration law firm Steel, Doebley & Glassman . Cohen, a former shareholder in the firm Cohen, Fluhr & Gonzalez, has 28 years' experience representing companies, educational institutions, hospitals, and other entities and individuals in a broad array of immigration matters. Malvern Federal Savings, the Paoli wholly owned subsidiary of Malvern Bancorp Inc., has promoted Karen Walter to chief operating officer, from senior vice president.
NEWS
December 30, 2015 | E.J. Dionne
There is an irony to the presidential candidacy of Bernie Sanders: The senator from Vermont is often cast as exotic because he calls himself a "democratic socialist. " Yet the most important issue in politics throughout the Western democracies is whether the economic and social world that social democrats built can survive the coming decades. Let's deal first with the tyranny of labels. Socialist has long been an unacceptable word in the United States, yet our country once had a vibrant socialist movement whose history has been well recounted by John Nichols and James Weinstein.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2015
UGI Corp., Valley Forge distributor and marketer of energy products and services, has appointed Roger Perreault to the newly created position of president, UGI International. He had been group vice president, large industries/world business line at Air Liquide. Glenmede, a privately-held investment and wealth management firm with $30 billion in assets under management in Philadelphia has appointed Laura LaRosa director of business development and Susan Mucciarone as director of private client relationship management.
NEWS
July 14, 2015 | BY DICK MEYER
ECONOMIC POPULISM is having a moment of celebrity these days. But so is economic gluttony. These conflicting impulses - equality vs. liberty - have been in constant competition. For some, equality of opportunity and outcomes is the ultimate political value; for others, it is liberty, which is degraded when property rights are too restricted by taxation and regulation. There is a view in both parties that voters are in an egalitarian mood. I don't buy it. The icon of economic gluttony in politics today is Donald Trump, however grotesque and trivial that may seem.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Glittering jewelry with hundreds of diamonds. A mansion towering over farmland near New Hope. More than 30 luxury cars - Ferraris, Rolls-Royces, Bentleys. Extravagant trappings were a fixture for the Risoldis, the politically connected Bucks County clan charged with duping insurers out of millions of dollars, according to filings from prosecutors and defense attorneys. What remains unclear is how a family whose members include a lawyer, a turnpike employee, a retired sheriff's deputy, and a matriarch who works as a receptionist afforded such a lifestyle.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2015 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Job-market improvements mean more people feel free to change jobs. But leaving a job can be difficult, even on the best of terms. Here are some guidelines for making a graceful exit. "Since the days of being loyal to one organization for an entire career are long gone, moving from one company to another is something that all of us will probably do," writes Ron Ashkenas, a contributor at Forbes.com. But, he asks in this post, "why do talented, bright, and capable people figuratively burn their bridges behind them?"
BUSINESS
February 9, 2015 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Valentines, in the course of time, may lead to a commingling of personal finances. Couples may not want to talk about money, but they probably should. Here are some conversation starters. "Congratulations , newlyweds," begins this post by personal-finance writer Laura Shin at Forbes.com. But Shin moves on quickly to the wallet. One study, she says, found that only 32 percent of engaged couples thought that talking about money would be easy and productive. According to Shin, "Money is the No. 1 cause of fights in marriage, but since that's no fun to think about, consider this instead: Establishing open dialogue around finances can help you ensure a long and happy marriage.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2015 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
It's the season for filing your 2014 tax return - and time to know how the tax laws have changed for 2015. Knowing what's new now can save you lots of money, and possibly a lot grief, in the long run. Here's a one-stop shop for tax-code changes to be aware of. Forbes.com lays out some easy-to-read tables showing the 2015 tax rates on incomes for individuals, married couples, trusts, and so forth. The page is one of the handiest out there, with summaries of changes such as new higher personal exemptions and standard deductions, and limits on itemized deductions for high earners.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|