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Wealth

NEWS
February 28, 2003 | By Kevin Dale INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Ridgeley Scott describes the night his wife went missing as a scene of suburban normality. Shortly after dinner three weeks ago today, as Scott was helping his son with his math homework, his wife, Anita, "announced she was going out," Scott said. Anita Scott, 58, didn't tell her husband where she was going or when she would return as she left their spacious stone colonial in Upper Providence, Delaware County, Scott and police say. "That's the last we saw of her," Scott said.
NEWS
February 24, 1999
Now that the courts are making decisions in favor of Imelda Marcos, she has publicly flouted any compromise to split her wealth with the [Filippino] government. . . . "If you know how rich you are, you are not rich," she commented. "I am not aware of the extent of my wealth. That's how rich we are. " - Karen Emmons South China Morning Post (Hong Kong), Dec. 13, 19
NEWS
July 26, 1986 | By Paul Magnusson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The concentration of wealth in the hands of a very few has increased dramatically in the United States, a new study says. The "super rich" - the top one-half of 1 percent of the population - held 35.1 percent of the nation's wealth in 1983, according to a survey by the Joint Economic Committee of Congress. That figure was an increase of nearly 10 percentage points from 20 years earlier, when the super rich had just 25.4 percent of the nation's wealth. Although the study does not show the rest of the population getting poorer as a result, "it is proof that the rich get richer," said Rep. David R. Obey (D., Wis.)
NEWS
May 13, 2007
Still figuring out to whom you want to give your vote Tuesday? The Great Expectations Web site, http:/go.philly.com/great expectations, offers a wealth of helpful material: Audio of mayoral and City Council candidate interviews, and City Council candidate debates. An archive of endorsements. An electronic debate between the First District candidates.
NEWS
January 6, 1999 | RON TARVER / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Sharing the wealth with his loyal subjects, Alex De Flavis, playing the part of Balthazar, distributes candy to students after a program at Sumner Elementary School in Camden. De Flavis visited yesterday as part of Three Kings Day, the 12th day of Christmas, on which gifts are traditionally given to children.
NEWS
June 6, 1993 | Inquirer photographs by Gerald S. Williams
A wealth of African culture was presented yesterday at the African Marketplace, which was held at the Afro-American Historical and Cultural Museum. Radio personality Georgie Woods was on hand to mark his 40th year in broadcasting.
NEWS
August 28, 1986 | By Paul Magnusson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Joint Economic Committee of Congress, which announced last week that it had made a mistake in a survey about the increasing concentration of wealth in the United States, said yesterday that it had mistakenly reported its mistake and that its original mistake was no mistake at all. Clear? If not, then it's back to Square One in the case of the missing $198 million. On July 25, the committee reported that the concentration of wealth in the hands of a few had increased dramatically, with the super rich - the top one- half of 1 percent of the wealthiest Americans - holding 35.1 percent of the nation's wealth in 1983.
NEWS
September 17, 2010 | By Jeannine Aversa, ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - Americans' wealth shrank in the spring for the first time since early 2009 as financial turmoil eroded stock portfolios. The Federal Reserve says household net worth fell 2.7 percent - or $1.5 trillion - in the April-to-June quarter. The decline left Americans' net worth at $53.5 trillion. Shriveled stock portfolios were the biggest force dragging down wealth. Wall Street was shaken by fears over Europe's debt crisis. Since then, stocks have recovered most of their losses from the April-June quarter.
NEWS
May 5, 1986
George Wilson, in his April 25 column, has again called upon the state to "share the wealth" of the state's surplus with local governments. The governor believes that the state's "wealth" belongs to those who created it in the first place, the taxpayers of the commonwealth. With legislative approval, the state's three years of cutting taxes will pump an additional $1.1 billion into the Pennsylvania economy. Individual taxpayers and businesses, not local-government bureaucrats, can best decide how to use this $1.1 billion.
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