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NEWS
January 6, 2003
IF PRESIDENT BUSH is so sure that Iraq has these weapons of mass destruction, why have weapons inspectors investigate at all? This whole thing is crazy. If the inspectors say that they found no such weapons, which every day the president keeps barking that they do, does that mean the inspectors are lying or they overlooked a place where the weapons are? Our all-knowing president should have told the inspectors where Iraq is hiding these weapons. I thank the celebrities who are coming out against the president for his constant rambling about Iraq.
NEWS
August 6, 1989 | By Karen K. Gress, Special to The Inquirer
How could you build a collection of guns, knives, throwing stars, brass knuckles, razors and numchuks? Look through the pockets and purses of the people who enter the Chester County Courthouse. A portion of the armory room in the county Sheriff's Department is filled with weapons confiscated by courthouse security officers since metal detectors were installed in the courthouse in December 1986. The 2,047 weapons, including a sword and several stilettos, have been confiscated since President Judge Leonard Sugerman ordered the installation of the three permanent metal detectors and the use of portable hand-held detectors to stop people with weapons from entering the 11 courtrooms and county offices.
NEWS
November 8, 2012 | By Carley Petesch, Associated Press
JOHANNESBURG - South African police may have altered evidence and planted weapons after they shot dead 34 striking miners near Lonmin's Marikana mines in August, according to photographic evidence presented at a commission of inquiry into the killings. Photographs taken by police the night after the shootings show more weapons by the dead bodies than there were in photographs taken immediately after the violence on Aug. 16. Thousands of miners had gathered at hills in Marikana about 58 miles northwest of Johannesburg where 34 miners were shot dead by police and 78 wounded in the worst state violence since the end of apartheid in 1994.
NEWS
October 6, 1988 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
The Millbourne Borough Council has appointed a new council member and has voted unanimously to allow its police officers to switch from .38-caliber revolvers to 9mm semi-automatic weapons that provide more firepower. Robert C. Barnes of Stephen Court was appointed Monday night to replace Charles L. Stewart, who resigned last month to accept the post of borough tax collector. Barnes, 61, is a salesman for Macy's in King of Prussia. He has lived in the borough since moving from Southwest Philadelphia in 1980.
SPORTS
December 30, 2009 | Daily News Wire Services
Washington police said yesterday they are investigating a report that weapons were found inside a locker room at the Verizon Center, where the Wizards play. Last week, the Wizards said that guard Gilbert Arenas stored unloaded firearms in a container in his locker at the arena and that the NBA was looking into the situation. But a Metropolitan Police Department spokeswoman did not mention Arenas or the team in a statement on the investigation. However, Arenas acknowledged he was being investigated after the Wizards' 110-98 loss to Oklahoma City at the Verizon Center last night; he did not specify if it was by the NBA or police.
NEWS
December 3, 1988 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
Next week's catalogue sale at Freeman/Fine Arts will be a three-day event with almost 1,300 lots, including early American furniture, interesting works by Pennsylvania painters, classic clocks and an unusual collection of weapons - including an anti-tank weapon. Among the furniture, which will be sold at the final session, starting at 10 a.m. next Saturday, is a Federal maple double-pedestal dining table. Made by Michael Allison in New York City around 1788, it is expected to sell for between $7,000 and $10,000.
NEWS
February 22, 1994 | BY PHIL LAPSANSKY
Although the notion of writing on the obvious connection between assault weapons and premature ejaculation is tempting, I will refrain from discoursing on the ultimate in "wham, bam, thank-you-ma'am" and instead propose a solution to the current conflict over local bans of these weapons. The problem: an abundance of these weapons in Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, where they are hated, and a paucity of them in Pennsylvania suburban and rural communities, where they are loved. The solution: take these maligned delinquent weapons out of sinful big cities and find them happy homes in purer and healthier countrified environs.
NEWS
April 17, 1994 | By Christine Bahls, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Centennial School District has passed a formal policy governing weapons and other hazardous devices students bring onto school grounds. Under the policy, unanimously approved by the school board Tuesday, a student caught with a weapon or explosive device would be immediately suspended and could be expelled. School board officials emphasized that the district had had very few problems with guns, knives and other weapons, but said that the policy was put into writing so there would be no question as to how to deal with such a situation.
NEWS
October 18, 1994 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Board of Education last night stiffened penalties for students who bring weapons to school and tightened the discipline code. School Superintendent Glenn Gray said that under the revised code, students who possess weapons will now be subject to a 10-day suspension, five days more than under the old rule. The board unanimously approved the revisions. Gray said the discipline code came under scrutiny in April after officials confiscated a starter pistol from an eighth grade student who had stashed it in his locker.
NEWS
October 16, 1995 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
It could be alarming walking into Center City's new Criminal Justice Center. Especially if you are carrying a weapon. During the past month, sheriff's deputies have confiscated about 400 knives and box cutters from visitors and potential jurors who set off alarms while trying to beat the metal detectors on the first floor of the Filbert Street building. Scores of other knives and razors have been checked at the front desk after vistors arrive and see the detectors. Those people get them back at the end of the day. One woman who came to file a domestic-abuse complaint was arrested for trying to smuggle a gun into the building.
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NEWS
February 13, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A GERMANTOWN artist who blew off part of his right hand after a homemade bomb exploded while he was holding it last year was convicted by a jury yesterday of a felony charge of possessing weapons of mass destruction. Douglas Ferrin, 55, was also convicted by the panel of 10 women and two men of a misdemeanor charge of possession of an instrument of crime. The jury deliberated for just 2 1/2 hours. About 4 a.m. on May 7, Ferrin was in the yard of his home, on Queen Lane near Germantown Avenue, when a device he was holding blew up, causing a boom and his neighbor's windows to shake.
NEWS
February 12, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A Germantown artist is on trial facing charges of weapons of mass destruction and possession of an instrument of crime, following his arrest last year after an item exploded in his hand - ripping off three of his fingers. Douglas Ferrin, 55, was in his yard outside his house on Queen Lane near Germantown Avenue about 4 a.m. May 7 when he was fiddling with an "illegal explosive device," according to authorities. Investigators later found three items in his house that they considered to be possible explosives - flash powder in a pill bottle, found in his living room, and flash powder in two small, thin tubes, found in an upstairs drawer.
NEWS
December 31, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
"I'M JUST GOING to the gym to work out . . . hopefully there won't be any problems. " Joseph Pacini recorded that statement in a YouTube video railing against police in Delaware County. About 30 minutes after the video was posted online yesterday, Pacini, 52, of Clifton Heights, died in a hail of gunfire at a Drexel Hill intersection after he allegedly tried to mow down a cop with his Nissan sedan, officials said. The deadly shooting was preceded by a pursuit through Delaware County, after law-enforcement officials from Haverford Township and Clifton Heights tried to arrest Pacini on a warrant for terroristic threats and related offenses, Upper Darby Police Superintendent Michael Chitwood said last night.
NEWS
December 29, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
In the absence of official information to the contrary - or, really, of any official information at all - one might have hoped that those investigating the violent death of a New Jersey political insider had a compelling reason for their communications stance, which has been more reminiscent of an international espionage ring than a suburban prosecutor's office. Perhaps officials disclosed so little about the deaths of former cabinet official John Sheridan and his wife because their investigative strategy required absolute obscurity about even the most basic facts.
NEWS
December 29, 2014 | By Barbara Boyer, Angelo Fichera, and Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writers
Three months after the investigation into the violent deaths of John and Joyce Sheridan began, key details of the case remain unexplained, and authorities have continued to interview people who knew the couple. The Somerset County Prosecutor's Office, the lead agency handling the case, has not said who or what led to the deaths 91 days ago of the Sheridans - John, Cooper Health System's chief executive, and Joyce, a retired teacher. Nor has it said who set the fire in the couple's master bedroom, where the pair were found with stab wounds.
NEWS
December 19, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Laura McCrystal, and Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writers
A year ago, Bradley Stone had agreed to give up his guns. Last week, he had persuaded a Veterans Affairs psychologist he was neither suicidal nor homicidal. On Wednesday, the onetime Marine had officials perplexed about how he died. A day after Stone's lifeless body turned up in a patch of Pennsburg woods - the final scene after a rampage that left his ex-wife and five others dead - the mystery surrounding his life and death deepened. Details also emerged that raised questions about whether Stone's murderous spree with guns and knives could have been detected or derailed.
NEWS
October 2, 2014
ISSUE | CLIMATE Made in the shade Moving a three-century-old trend of industrialization toward one where Earth is respected requires several elements to be in play, which I don't see happening ("Change in the air," Sept. 29). It's fine to invent newer and better forms of energy and reduce carbon emissions. What about strategically planting trees? Highway engineers who reduce noise by building walls should also plant sturdy, disease-resistant trees like elms. Yeah, the kinds you see lining certain street blocks, which offer nice shade in the hot weather and cool you down while making you breathe better.
NEWS
October 1, 2014 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia high school students equipped with welding torches and steel plates are wielding their tools to build drop boxes for weapons and other contraband. Students at A. Philip Randolph Career and Technical High School in the Allegheny West neighborhood have made waist-high, blue-and-white amnesty boxes as collection receptacles to be placed outside selected city schools. Police said students are unlikely to discard firearms in the boxes, as that doesn't typically happen in other amnesty programs.
NEWS
September 23, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
CANADENSIS, Pa. - Search teams combing the dense, rugged woods not far from where two state troopers were shot on Sept. 12 - one fatally - have discovered an AK-47-style assault weapon like the one suspect Eric Frein was known to have. That discovery and other clues, state police Lt. Col. George Bivens said Sunday, convinced authorities the searchers were closing in on the accused killer. "We're pushing him hard," Bivens said. "He's no longer safe there. " With the weapon were two magazine clips of ammunition and a camouflage bag full of ammunition, all partially hidden in tangled forest undergrowth.
NEWS
September 22, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
When Ukraine President Petro Poroshenko addressed a joint session of Congress last week, he called on members to support Ukrainian freedom and democracy. They stood and cheered. Ukrainians must "live free or die," the president said, using a slogan from the American Revolution to describe his struggle with "rebels" who have taken over the eastern regions of his country. In reality, these separatists are Russian proxies, whom the Kremlin armed and organized in an effort to drag Kiev back into Moscow's orbit.
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