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NEWS
January 6, 2003
IF PRESIDENT BUSH is so sure that Iraq has these weapons of mass destruction, why have weapons inspectors investigate at all? This whole thing is crazy. If the inspectors say that they found no such weapons, which every day the president keeps barking that they do, does that mean the inspectors are lying or they overlooked a place where the weapons are? Our all-knowing president should have told the inspectors where Iraq is hiding these weapons. I thank the celebrities who are coming out against the president for his constant rambling about Iraq.
NEWS
August 6, 1989 | By Karen K. Gress, Special to The Inquirer
How could you build a collection of guns, knives, throwing stars, brass knuckles, razors and numchuks? Look through the pockets and purses of the people who enter the Chester County Courthouse. A portion of the armory room in the county Sheriff's Department is filled with weapons confiscated by courthouse security officers since metal detectors were installed in the courthouse in December 1986. The 2,047 weapons, including a sword and several stilettos, have been confiscated since President Judge Leonard Sugerman ordered the installation of the three permanent metal detectors and the use of portable hand-held detectors to stop people with weapons from entering the 11 courtrooms and county offices.
NEWS
November 8, 2012 | By Carley Petesch, Associated Press
JOHANNESBURG - South African police may have altered evidence and planted weapons after they shot dead 34 striking miners near Lonmin's Marikana mines in August, according to photographic evidence presented at a commission of inquiry into the killings. Photographs taken by police the night after the shootings show more weapons by the dead bodies than there were in photographs taken immediately after the violence on Aug. 16. Thousands of miners had gathered at hills in Marikana about 58 miles northwest of Johannesburg where 34 miners were shot dead by police and 78 wounded in the worst state violence since the end of apartheid in 1994.
NEWS
October 6, 1988 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
The Millbourne Borough Council has appointed a new council member and has voted unanimously to allow its police officers to switch from .38-caliber revolvers to 9mm semi-automatic weapons that provide more firepower. Robert C. Barnes of Stephen Court was appointed Monday night to replace Charles L. Stewart, who resigned last month to accept the post of borough tax collector. Barnes, 61, is a salesman for Macy's in King of Prussia. He has lived in the borough since moving from Southwest Philadelphia in 1980.
SPORTS
December 30, 2009 | Daily News Wire Services
Washington police said yesterday they are investigating a report that weapons were found inside a locker room at the Verizon Center, where the Wizards play. Last week, the Wizards said that guard Gilbert Arenas stored unloaded firearms in a container in his locker at the arena and that the NBA was looking into the situation. But a Metropolitan Police Department spokeswoman did not mention Arenas or the team in a statement on the investigation. However, Arenas acknowledged he was being investigated after the Wizards' 110-98 loss to Oklahoma City at the Verizon Center last night; he did not specify if it was by the NBA or police.
NEWS
December 3, 1988 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
Next week's catalogue sale at Freeman/Fine Arts will be a three-day event with almost 1,300 lots, including early American furniture, interesting works by Pennsylvania painters, classic clocks and an unusual collection of weapons - including an anti-tank weapon. Among the furniture, which will be sold at the final session, starting at 10 a.m. next Saturday, is a Federal maple double-pedestal dining table. Made by Michael Allison in New York City around 1788, it is expected to sell for between $7,000 and $10,000.
NEWS
February 22, 1994 | BY PHIL LAPSANSKY
Although the notion of writing on the obvious connection between assault weapons and premature ejaculation is tempting, I will refrain from discoursing on the ultimate in "wham, bam, thank-you-ma'am" and instead propose a solution to the current conflict over local bans of these weapons. The problem: an abundance of these weapons in Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, where they are hated, and a paucity of them in Pennsylvania suburban and rural communities, where they are loved. The solution: take these maligned delinquent weapons out of sinful big cities and find them happy homes in purer and healthier countrified environs.
NEWS
April 17, 1994 | By Christine Bahls, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Centennial School District has passed a formal policy governing weapons and other hazardous devices students bring onto school grounds. Under the policy, unanimously approved by the school board Tuesday, a student caught with a weapon or explosive device would be immediately suspended and could be expelled. School board officials emphasized that the district had had very few problems with guns, knives and other weapons, but said that the policy was put into writing so there would be no question as to how to deal with such a situation.
NEWS
October 18, 1994 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Board of Education last night stiffened penalties for students who bring weapons to school and tightened the discipline code. School Superintendent Glenn Gray said that under the revised code, students who possess weapons will now be subject to a 10-day suspension, five days more than under the old rule. The board unanimously approved the revisions. Gray said the discipline code came under scrutiny in April after officials confiscated a starter pistol from an eighth grade student who had stashed it in his locker.
NEWS
October 16, 1995 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
It could be alarming walking into Center City's new Criminal Justice Center. Especially if you are carrying a weapon. During the past month, sheriff's deputies have confiscated about 400 knives and box cutters from visitors and potential jurors who set off alarms while trying to beat the metal detectors on the first floor of the Filbert Street building. Scores of other knives and razors have been checked at the front desk after vistors arrive and see the detectors. Those people get them back at the end of the day. One woman who came to file a domestic-abuse complaint was arrested for trying to smuggle a gun into the building.
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NEWS
January 9, 2016
ISSUE | HUMAN RIGHTS End female mutilation Congratulations to Gambia for banning female genital mutilation and setting a $1,250 fine and up to three years in prison for those who practice it ("Bill banning mutilation passes," Jan. 1). The removal of external female genitalia for nonmedical reasons is practiced in countries around the world, though it is banned by the United Nations. The girl is often held down on an unsterile kitchen or coffee table and cut with scissors or shards of glass.
NEWS
November 19, 2015 | John Baer, Daily News Political Columnist
DWIGHT EVANS seeks a new political place. After 34 years in the Legislature during which he ran, then lost, the powerful House Appropriations Committee, after failed runs for lieutenant governor, governor and twice for mayor, he's now running for Congress. I wonder why. Why leave one mess in one Capitol for an arguably bigger mess in another? Especially since Washington runs on seniority, so if he wins, he starts on the bottom rung of the ladder. Maybe he's bored with Harrisburg.
NEWS
November 5, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a three-inch hunting knife and a loaded handgun were found on school property this fall, the Unionville-Chadds Ford School District is planning a community meeting on school safety. "Parents are legitimately concerned," school board member Jeff Hellrung said. The meeting at 6 p.m. next Wednesday at Unionville High School will review the school's safety plan and "what else needs to be addressed" to keep students safe, a memo on the school's website said. "There has been district-wide concern and outrage over this incident, understandably so," Superintendent John Sanville said in a news release about the gun, which was left in an unlocked car outside Charles F. Patton Middle School.
SPORTS
October 17, 2015 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kip Patton caught the pass and immediately turned upfield. He shrugged off an attempted tackler and turned on the jets before finally being tackled on the Tulane 5-yard line. All told it was a 43-yard completion, showing both the big-play ability and improvement in the 6-foot-4, 241-pound tight end from Norristown High. It was one of the Owls' many highlight plays from a 49-10 win over visiting Tulane on Saturday. "I caught the ball and felt somebody hit me and bounce off and it was a great feeling," said Patton, whose 5-0 Owls host Central Florida (0-6)
SPORTS
October 6, 2015 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
YOU WOULD think that with his new offensive weapons, Brett Brown would be sitting over a computer or notepad, rubbing his hands with wide eyes, sort of in mad scientest mode as he concocts plays. The offseason brought him what very well could be a formidable inside presence in rookie Jahlil Okafor, as well as an outside scoring threat in Nik Stauskas, acquired in a trade with the Sacramento Kings. Add those two elements with a legitimate outside shooter in Robert Covington, an improved offensive player in Nerlens Noel and a point guard contingent that possesses the ability to score (Isaiah Canaan and Tony Wroten)
NEWS
September 11, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a recycling twist, Upper Darby Township police are taking more than 150 weapons from their evidence room - seized in domestic-violence incidents, assaults, shootings, drug busts, and suicides - to a trash-to-steam plant. "Our way of addressing the gun issue in America is to destroy them all," said Michael Chitwood, township police superintendent. He said the weapons would be taken to the Delaware Valley Resource Recovery facility, in the City of Chester. "Gun violence is a way of our life," said Chitwood.
SPORTS
September 7, 2015 | By Jake Kaplan, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the last 15 months, countless hitters at four levels of pro baseball have found themselves quickly behind in counts because of Aaron Nola's pinpoint fastball command. Then will often come his best secondary pitch, a breaking ball, and with it an obvious question from those watching. "Was that a slider or a curveball?" Since the Phillies drafted Nola seventh overall in the 2014 draft out of Louisiana State, his breaking pitch has been labeled as both in articles and in interviews with opposing hitters.
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | By Chris Melchiorre, For The Inquirer
The first time Matt Donnelly saw a backstop behind a lacrosse cage, it was like a revelation. His neighbor, Mike Sutton, had a cage in his backyard. And the backstop behind it changed everything for Donnelly. "I couldn't believe it," he said. "I could shoot all I wanted and not have go chase after every shot," Donnelly said with a laugh. For years after that, Donnelly and Sutton would spend hours, days on end, practicing their shot and refining their games. Whatever they were doing, it worked extraordinarily well.
SPORTS
May 28, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
The debate might be as old as leather helmets and it definitely predates soccer-style kickers. It might have been at its height in the 1990s, when two of the greatest running backs ever - Dallas' Emmitt Smith and Detroit's Barry Sanders - played the game. The burning question then and now: Does the running back make the offensive line or is it the offensive line that makes the running back? It is an argument that will be fueled during the next season by the Eagles and the Cowboys.
NEWS
May 23, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police and federal officials are investigating an early-morning burglary at a Delaware County gun store in which thieves made off with 19 weapons. At 4:13 a.m., three or more men broke through the front window of the Suburban Armory, at 1008 McDade Blvd., in Collingdale. Once inside the store, they stole semiautomatic handguns, and revolvers, said Steven Bartholomew, special agent for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives. "They smashed cabinets and grabbed the handguns," he said.
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