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NEWS
January 6, 2003
IF PRESIDENT BUSH is so sure that Iraq has these weapons of mass destruction, why have weapons inspectors investigate at all? This whole thing is crazy. If the inspectors say that they found no such weapons, which every day the president keeps barking that they do, does that mean the inspectors are lying or they overlooked a place where the weapons are? Our all-knowing president should have told the inspectors where Iraq is hiding these weapons. I thank the celebrities who are coming out against the president for his constant rambling about Iraq.
NEWS
August 6, 1989 | By Karen K. Gress, Special to The Inquirer
How could you build a collection of guns, knives, throwing stars, brass knuckles, razors and numchuks? Look through the pockets and purses of the people who enter the Chester County Courthouse. A portion of the armory room in the county Sheriff's Department is filled with weapons confiscated by courthouse security officers since metal detectors were installed in the courthouse in December 1986. The 2,047 weapons, including a sword and several stilettos, have been confiscated since President Judge Leonard Sugerman ordered the installation of the three permanent metal detectors and the use of portable hand-held detectors to stop people with weapons from entering the 11 courtrooms and county offices.
NEWS
November 8, 2012 | By Carley Petesch, Associated Press
JOHANNESBURG - South African police may have altered evidence and planted weapons after they shot dead 34 striking miners near Lonmin's Marikana mines in August, according to photographic evidence presented at a commission of inquiry into the killings. Photographs taken by police the night after the shootings show more weapons by the dead bodies than there were in photographs taken immediately after the violence on Aug. 16. Thousands of miners had gathered at hills in Marikana about 58 miles northwest of Johannesburg where 34 miners were shot dead by police and 78 wounded in the worst state violence since the end of apartheid in 1994.
NEWS
October 6, 1988 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
The Millbourne Borough Council has appointed a new council member and has voted unanimously to allow its police officers to switch from .38-caliber revolvers to 9mm semi-automatic weapons that provide more firepower. Robert C. Barnes of Stephen Court was appointed Monday night to replace Charles L. Stewart, who resigned last month to accept the post of borough tax collector. Barnes, 61, is a salesman for Macy's in King of Prussia. He has lived in the borough since moving from Southwest Philadelphia in 1980.
SPORTS
December 30, 2009 | Daily News Wire Services
Washington police said yesterday they are investigating a report that weapons were found inside a locker room at the Verizon Center, where the Wizards play. Last week, the Wizards said that guard Gilbert Arenas stored unloaded firearms in a container in his locker at the arena and that the NBA was looking into the situation. But a Metropolitan Police Department spokeswoman did not mention Arenas or the team in a statement on the investigation. However, Arenas acknowledged he was being investigated after the Wizards' 110-98 loss to Oklahoma City at the Verizon Center last night; he did not specify if it was by the NBA or police.
NEWS
December 3, 1988 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
Next week's catalogue sale at Freeman/Fine Arts will be a three-day event with almost 1,300 lots, including early American furniture, interesting works by Pennsylvania painters, classic clocks and an unusual collection of weapons - including an anti-tank weapon. Among the furniture, which will be sold at the final session, starting at 10 a.m. next Saturday, is a Federal maple double-pedestal dining table. Made by Michael Allison in New York City around 1788, it is expected to sell for between $7,000 and $10,000.
NEWS
February 22, 1994 | BY PHIL LAPSANSKY
Although the notion of writing on the obvious connection between assault weapons and premature ejaculation is tempting, I will refrain from discoursing on the ultimate in "wham, bam, thank-you-ma'am" and instead propose a solution to the current conflict over local bans of these weapons. The problem: an abundance of these weapons in Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, where they are hated, and a paucity of them in Pennsylvania suburban and rural communities, where they are loved. The solution: take these maligned delinquent weapons out of sinful big cities and find them happy homes in purer and healthier countrified environs.
NEWS
April 17, 1994 | By Christine Bahls, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Centennial School District has passed a formal policy governing weapons and other hazardous devices students bring onto school grounds. Under the policy, unanimously approved by the school board Tuesday, a student caught with a weapon or explosive device would be immediately suspended and could be expelled. School board officials emphasized that the district had had very few problems with guns, knives and other weapons, but said that the policy was put into writing so there would be no question as to how to deal with such a situation.
NEWS
October 18, 1994 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Board of Education last night stiffened penalties for students who bring weapons to school and tightened the discipline code. School Superintendent Glenn Gray said that under the revised code, students who possess weapons will now be subject to a 10-day suspension, five days more than under the old rule. The board unanimously approved the revisions. Gray said the discipline code came under scrutiny in April after officials confiscated a starter pistol from an eighth grade student who had stashed it in his locker.
NEWS
October 16, 1995 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
It could be alarming walking into Center City's new Criminal Justice Center. Especially if you are carrying a weapon. During the past month, sheriff's deputies have confiscated about 400 knives and box cutters from visitors and potential jurors who set off alarms while trying to beat the metal detectors on the first floor of the Filbert Street building. Scores of other knives and razors have been checked at the front desk after vistors arrive and see the detectors. Those people get them back at the end of the day. One woman who came to file a domestic-abuse complaint was arrested for trying to smuggle a gun into the building.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 2, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
University of Pennsylvania researchers have earned acclaim in recent years for using a type of genetic engineering to treat leukemia. Now another Penn team says the tactic may be effective against a debilitating skin disease. That is because the two maladies have something in common: deviant cells of the immune system. The treatment for the skin disease, a rare autoimmune disorder called pemphigus vulgaris, has been demonstrated so far only in mice, the scientists reported online Thursday in the journal Science.
NEWS
June 22, 2016
ISSUE | TERROR IN ORLANDO Toomey wrong about weapons ban Sen. Patrick Toomey (R., Pa.) contends that bans on entire classes of commonly owned firearms prevent law-abiding Americans from exercising their constitutional rights ("Prevent more senseless deaths," Sunday). Anyone familiar with the history of the 1994 federal assault-weapons ban, however, knows this contention to be inaccurate. Prior to its expiration in 2004, the constitutionality of the ban was challenged in five court proceedings and was rejected in each.
NEWS
June 15, 2016 | By Mari A. Schaefer, STAFF WRITER
In Pennsylvania, buying an AR-15 semi-automatic weapon is about as easy as buying lunch, experts say. Go to a licensed gun store, sign the papers, complete an instant background check, pop down the money and walk out with the weapon. No waiting period is necessary. "You can buy an AR-15 as quickly as you can buy a cheesesteak," said Michael J. Chitwood, Upper Darby police superintendent. "It is astonishingly easy," said Bryan Miller, spokesman for the Philadelphia chapter of Heeding God's Call, a faith-based movement to prevent gun violence.
NEWS
June 9, 2016
Winslow Township Middle School was put on lockdown for a while Tuesday after a student was found to have a kitchen-style steak knife and a spring-loaded pellet gun in a classroom, police said. The student did not threaten anyone, and no students were in danger, police said. Officers responded around 12:40 p.m. to the school after receiving a report of a student with a weapon. Police said the student was charged with possession of weapons for an unlawful purpose. - Michael Boren
NEWS
June 2, 2016
ISSUE | HIROSHIMA Get serious about abolishing nuclear weapons "We must have the courage to escape the logic of fear and pursue a world without" nuclear weapons, President Obama's said during his moving visit to Hiroshima, site of the world's first use of such a bomb against a city ("Death fell from the sky," Saturday). Those words echoed his Prague declaration, in which he called for nuclear disarmament and nonproliferation, leading to a Nobel Peace Prize. Obama's visit to Hiroshima was a noble gesture, but the logic of his words - and of our times - demands that we begin the process of serious negotiations to abolish nuclear weapons so that never again can a Hiroshima happen anywhere on Earth.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
At the Arden Theatre, a rich array of local acting talent is cultivating The Secret Garden , the Marsha Norman/Lucy Simon musical, innovatively co-conceived by Jorge Cousineau and company artistic director Terrence J. Nolen. In the show, based on Frances Hodgson Burnett's 1911 novel, vocal powerhouses Jeffrey Coon, Alex Keiper, and Steve Pacek sing of illness, loneliness, and neglect in the setting of a gloomy Yorkshire estate in the early years of the 20th century. Each Philadelphia thespian has showstopping moments of Celtic pop song.
SPORTS
May 9, 2016 | By Matt Breen, STAFF WRITER
Brandon Moss hacked helplessly at Hector Neris' offering. The swing was so off-balance that the Cardinal's body spun in a circle Tuesday night. Neris made another opponent look foolish. The Phillies pitcher claimed his latest victim by way of his dominant splitter. Neris - the surprise force of the Phillies' surprising bullpen - removed his cap and pointed to the sky as he walked off the mound. His wild season and unlikely baseball journey continued. Neris spent last season between the majors and triple A. He did not play a vital role with the Phillies.
SPORTS
March 13, 2016 | By Bob Ford, Columnist
NEW YORK - There were more than two words on the Villanova defensive game plan against Providence on Friday night in the Big East semifinals, but there really didn't have to be. Dunn and Bentil. That was really what the night would be about for the Wildcats. Point guard Kris Dunn, soon to be an NBA lottery pick, and Ben Bentil, a dominating power forward coming off a 38-point performance in the quarterfinals. If Villanova was going to reach the conference championship game for the second straight year, it would be because the Wildcats didn't let those two get in the way. The only question was how exactly that might happen.
NEWS
March 11, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
MAKHMOUR, Iraq - From a fortified Kurdish hilltop bunker I could overlook the frontline town of Gwer and across the Great Zab river to stands of trees and derelict buildings where ISIS fighters are dug in. On Monday night, ISIS rockets whizzed over this bunker. Several kilometers to the rear, framed by dusty hills, sits Black Tiger Camp, the spartan headquarters of Gen. Sirwan Barzani, the Kurdish commander of the Gwer-Makhmour region. The camp gets its name from the 1990s, when the burly, mustachioed Barzani led peshmerga fighters in their rebellion against Saddam Hussein and earned the nickname "Black Tiger.
NEWS
January 9, 2016
ISSUE | HUMAN RIGHTS End female mutilation Congratulations to Gambia for banning female genital mutilation and setting a $1,250 fine and up to three years in prison for those who practice it ("Bill banning mutilation passes," Jan. 1). The removal of external female genitalia for nonmedical reasons is practiced in countries around the world, though it is banned by the United Nations. The girl is often held down on an unsterile kitchen or coffee table and cut with scissors or shards of glass.
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