CollectionsWeather Station
IN THE NEWS

Weather Station

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 1, 1994 | By Gary Sternberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A computerized weather station will be installed at the the Camden County Vocational-Technical School District campus here and will provide information to anyone with a computer modem and a phone line. School district officials made the announcement last night during a board meeting. Board members also voted to provide a small piece of land for the project. District Superintendent R. Sanders Haldeman said the weather station, which will consist of sensors attached to computer devices, will provide precise data on rainfall amounts, humidity, temperature and wind.
NEWS
January 24, 2016
Those Darlins. Last chance to see the terrific Nashville rock-and-roll trio, who are unfortunately going on "indefinite hiatus" after a three-album run highlighted by 2011's Screws Get Loose . They've released a cover of Divine's title track to John Waters' movie Female Trouble as a parting gift. 8:30 p.m. Sunday at Boot & Saddle. The Weather Station. The nom de folk for exemplary Canadian songwriter Tamara Lindeman, whose stately, self-regarding third album, Loyalty , was one of 2015's overlooked gems.
NEWS
January 28, 2001 | By Kaitlin Gurney, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Twenty-five budding meteorologists gather after school each Wednesday at the Thomas E. Bowe Elementary School, actually begging for extra science experiments. The new sixth-grade weather club has become one of the school's most popular extracurricular activities, science teacher Marilu Bicknell said, in part because the students can look forward to using the school's high-tech weather equipment and becoming the school's own weather personalities through daily forecasts. The idea for the club arose last year, Bicknell said, when she and two other teachers, Andrea Brida and Brandi Williams, received a $7,500 grant from the Glassboro Educational Foundation to buy materials for the Bowe School's own weather station.
NEWS
September 6, 1994 | For The Inquirer / MARTY O'GRADY
Steve Quesenberry, left, checks a water collector at a weather station in Pennypacker Park in Cherry Hill. At right, Quesenberry's wife, Lola, logs maintenance data at the park. The weather station, one of eight, is maintained by the South Jersey Resource Conservation and Development Council in Hammonton, where weather data are automatically transmitted via computer.
NEWS
April 19, 1993 | By Lacy McCrary, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joy Trauger, 17, always seemed to know where she was going. At 13, she decided she was going to the U.S. Air Force Academy to become a pilot - a fighter pilot. In the next four years, she pursued that goal with determination. An exceptional student with an SAT score of above 1400, she ranked second in the senior class at Delaware Valley Regional High School in Frenchtown, N.J. She belonged to an array of school groups; she was a champion skier and an avid swimmer, camper and backpacker.
NEWS
February 13, 1997 | By Monique El-Faizy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Between an appearance by a television personality and discussion of a new stadium, the school board approved a project that could revolutionize life for Abington students. After a long presentation decipherable only by those familiar with computerese, the board voted to give the district a dedicated high-speed connection to the Internet, which would enable the district to become its own Internet provider. Eventually, the district would be able to defray the cost by sharing the connection with other districts, and businesses and organizations would be able to use the Internet through the schools' connection.
LIVING
January 19, 1993 | By Dodge Johnson, FOR THE INQUIRER
Dale Dockus, 36, is a senior meteorologist for Federal Express in Memphis, Tenn. He and his three associates are surrounded by computers that devour data, spit out charts and graphics, and plot weather instantly, not just on the ground but also in the atmosphere. Over the next several hours, they will make forecasts for the 160 cities where Federal Express flies - specifying cloud ceilings, wind speed and direction on the ground and at several levels aloft, whether there will be rain, sleet, fog - so controllers can prepare flight plans.
NEWS
March 20, 2009 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Historically, few places in the region have been more snow-deprived than the official measuring station at Philadelphia International Airport. In the winter that just ended, however, the airport ruler appeared to be on steroids. For the first time in 31 years, the National Weather Service recorded two official snowfalls of 8-plus inches in the same season, making the airport a regional snow capital. The explanation? It was a peculiar winter, for sure, but it might be worth noting that after 60 years, the "airport" measurements are no longer taken at the airport.
NEWS
December 31, 1989 | By Larry Borska, Special to The Inquirer
Give Mark Dill a thunderstorm to watch and he's happy. Give him a good snowfall and he's entertained for hours. A tornado can be cause for celebration. Dill is not a lover of disaster. He is a weather-watcher, and a meticulous one at that. A member of the Association of American Weather Observers and the Atlantic Coast Observer Network, the 33-year-old West Chester resident helps the National Weather Service more accurately predict the meteorological future by giving detailed observations of local weather conditions.
NEWS
April 14, 1996 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the government's brand-new automated weather station at Philadelphia International Airport, the winter of 1995-96 turned out to be a baptism of fire, snow and ice. And like millions of people in the region and throughout the Northeast, it had a rough time. As the government had promised, the Automated Surface Observing System, or ASOS, was able to monitor the weather without the aid of human beings, who have been doing this work for more than 100 years. Unfortunately, in some cases, it didn't monitor it very well, and human beings - paid government contractors, in this case - had to back it up. During the Jan. 7-8 blizzard, for example, its precipitation sensor became clogged with snow and was essentially useless.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 24, 2016
Those Darlins. Last chance to see the terrific Nashville rock-and-roll trio, who are unfortunately going on "indefinite hiatus" after a three-album run highlighted by 2011's Screws Get Loose . They've released a cover of Divine's title track to John Waters' movie Female Trouble as a parting gift. 8:30 p.m. Sunday at Boot & Saddle. The Weather Station. The nom de folk for exemplary Canadian songwriter Tamara Lindeman, whose stately, self-regarding third album, Loyalty , was one of 2015's overlooked gems.
NEWS
March 20, 2009 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Historically, few places in the region have been more snow-deprived than the official measuring station at Philadelphia International Airport. In the winter that just ended, however, the airport ruler appeared to be on steroids. For the first time in 31 years, the National Weather Service recorded two official snowfalls of 8-plus inches in the same season, making the airport a regional snow capital. The explanation? It was a peculiar winter, for sure, but it might be worth noting that after 60 years, the "airport" measurements are no longer taken at the airport.
NEWS
February 22, 2004 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New Jersey, it seems, is prime territory for quirky weather patterns. Divergent storm systems sweeping across the nation often converge just before reaching the Jersey coast. Sometimes the systems clash and create dramatic storms. Sometimes it means that what happens in one part of the state may not in another. The Atlantic Ocean, a diverse geography, and population patterns ranging from rural to dense all add up to weird and wacky weather, where - for example - temperatures from place to place can vary by 20 degrees and a storm can dump a foot of snow on Absecon but leave Atlantic City with just icy rain.
NEWS
January 28, 2001 | By Kaitlin Gurney, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Twenty-five budding meteorologists gather after school each Wednesday at the Thomas E. Bowe Elementary School, actually begging for extra science experiments. The new sixth-grade weather club has become one of the school's most popular extracurricular activities, science teacher Marilu Bicknell said, in part because the students can look forward to using the school's high-tech weather equipment and becoming the school's own weather personalities through daily forecasts. The idea for the club arose last year, Bicknell said, when she and two other teachers, Andrea Brida and Brandi Williams, received a $7,500 grant from the Glassboro Educational Foundation to buy materials for the Bowe School's own weather station.
NEWS
April 23, 1999 | By Denise-Marie Balona, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Neither rain nor snow, sleet nor hail will keep a new Burlington County program from aiding farmers. With a $20,000 grant from the state Department of Environmental Protection, the county plans to install automated weather stations at three locations to measure changes in the climate to help farmers fight pests and keep crops properly watered. The stations, which look much like large camera tripods, would constantly measure temperature, wind speed and direction, rainfall, solar energy and humidity.
NEWS
September 21, 1998 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In the next few months, eighth graders at Franklin Delano Roosevelt Middle School will feed environmental data to scientists around the world that will help with research on the ozone layer, global warming, and the effects of El Nino. In the meantime, they were busy last week with what looked like a game of leapfrog with meter sticks. Working outdoors in small groups, the students lined up about six meter sticks end to end, reaching out from the school. They had to mark a spot about 30 meters, or 96 feet, away where instruments would be set up to take atmospheric readings.
NEWS
February 13, 1997 | By Monique El-Faizy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Between an appearance by a television personality and discussion of a new stadium, the school board approved a project that could revolutionize life for Abington students. After a long presentation decipherable only by those familiar with computerese, the board voted to give the district a dedicated high-speed connection to the Internet, which would enable the district to become its own Internet provider. Eventually, the district would be able to defray the cost by sharing the connection with other districts, and businesses and organizations would be able to use the Internet through the schools' connection.
NEWS
April 14, 1996 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the government's brand-new automated weather station at Philadelphia International Airport, the winter of 1995-96 turned out to be a baptism of fire, snow and ice. And like millions of people in the region and throughout the Northeast, it had a rough time. As the government had promised, the Automated Surface Observing System, or ASOS, was able to monitor the weather without the aid of human beings, who have been doing this work for more than 100 years. Unfortunately, in some cases, it didn't monitor it very well, and human beings - paid government contractors, in this case - had to back it up. During the Jan. 7-8 blizzard, for example, its precipitation sensor became clogged with snow and was essentially useless.
NEWS
September 6, 1994 | For The Inquirer / MARTY O'GRADY
Steve Quesenberry, left, checks a water collector at a weather station in Pennypacker Park in Cherry Hill. At right, Quesenberry's wife, Lola, logs maintenance data at the park. The weather station, one of eight, is maintained by the South Jersey Resource Conservation and Development Council in Hammonton, where weather data are automatically transmitted via computer.
NEWS
September 1, 1994 | By Gary Sternberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A computerized weather station will be installed at the the Camden County Vocational-Technical School District campus here and will provide information to anyone with a computer modem and a phone line. School district officials made the announcement last night during a board meeting. Board members also voted to provide a small piece of land for the project. District Superintendent R. Sanders Haldeman said the weather station, which will consist of sensors attached to computer devices, will provide precise data on rainfall amounts, humidity, temperature and wind.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|