CollectionsWebsite
IN THE NEWS

Website

NEWS
December 29, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A cash-strapped charter school with two Philadelphia campuses has notified parents it plans to close for good this week. But officials from the School District of Philadelphia said Saturday night the decision was news to them. In a notice posted on the school's website, administrators at the Walter D. Palmer Leadership Learning Partners Charter School said its board had voted to permanently close the school Wednesday after months of financial turmoil. The words permanently close were in red. A letter dated Friday was sent out to parents with information about reenrolling their children at other schools.
NEWS
December 28, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was 2006 when Joy Stocke and Kimberly Nagy did the unthinkable: They essentially converted the highly regarded literary magazine the Bucks County Writer - founded in 1998 and published by the Writers Room of Bucks County - to an online journal. "We were told we were going to fail," Stocke recalled. In reality, failure was the likely outcome if the magazine remained in print form, she said. "We could no longer afford to distribute print," said Stocke, 57, who, as a literary journalist, author, and community organizer of writers, took over the Doylestown-based nonprofit Bucks County Writer in May 2003, editing it until the winter of 2006.
NEWS
December 21, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
When 2-year-old Brandon Schultz of Bryn Mawr was diagnosed with autism in 2009, his mother, Jean, was devastated. "You never think it's going to happen to you," she says. But since those early days, Schultz, 44, a cardiac clinical care specialist, has become an advocate for finding a cure for and the causes of autism spectrum disorder. She speaks to parents and clinicians on her experience, and has enrolled Brandon in several clinical trials at the Center for Autism Research at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
December 8, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tom "Chico" Stafford is an imposing figure - both physically, at 5-foot-10, 240 pounds, and by what comes out of his mouth. He apologizes for cursing but says he gets frustrated with his African American community. What especially riles the 64-year-old serial entrepreneur are those who ask for handouts and those who allow money to define them. The latter has happened to hip-hop culture, Stafford said, with rappers whose lyrics degrade women and celebrate drugs and gross consumerism getting all the attention - and a good deal of sales.
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Rubbing shoulders with superstar athletes can be thrilling for mere mortals like myself. (I ran junior-varsity cross-country as a high school senior. Not kidding.) But can professional athletes teach us management skills? Keep your expectations within reason. Increasingly, Philadelphia financial firms are corralling sports executives, professional athletes, and coaches to speak, with the idea that "behind-the-scrimmage line" backstories will uncover secrets to success. Maybe, maybe not. But it's an experience for which Philadelphians are paying big bucks.
NEWS
November 12, 2014
P ATRICK MICHAEL Carrow, 46, of Bella Vista, is owner and creative director of Patrick Michael Accessories, in North Philly. Carrow creates one-of-a-kind handbags, clutches, wallets and wine totes from discontinued fabrics he sources from textile mills overseas. The business, started in 2009, sells from a website, at craft shows and at boutiques. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for the biz? A: I've always collected beautiful fabrics, and one night I stacked all the fabrics and, after running errands, came back and saw this harmony of color, print and texture.
NEWS
October 22, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
T HE CITY shells out a pretty penny every year to settle lawsuits based on allegations of police misconduct. MuckRock.com, which bills itself as a "collaborative news site" that helps journalists, researchers and citizens analyze and share government documents, posted an online report yesterday that looked at how Philadelphia's annual payouts stack up against those in a handful of other large cities. The findings might not surprise you. The city has shelled out more than $40 million to settle 584 of the 1,223 police-misconduct lawsuits - think wrongful-shooting deaths, excessive force or illegal searches - filed since January 2009, the website reported.
NEWS
October 19, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Gov. Corbett's campaign pulled the image of a smiling black woman from its website Friday after the news organization BuzzFeed reported that she was not a real supporter - but, rather, a model whose image was lifted from a stock photograph. The new "footer" image on the bottom border of the website features people posing with Corbett in an office. A spokesman stressed that they are actual supporters of the governor. "We changed the photo to prevent Tom Wolf from using trivial matters like website graphics as a distraction to avoid talking about why he refuses to release any details about his . . . plan to triple the state's income tax rate," spokesman Chris Pack said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2014 | By Jan L. Apple, For The Inquirer
The sepia-toned transparency of Paulette Jellinek's late parents hangs inside a window, a constant reminder of her family's tragic and triumphant past. It is this story that Jellinek, a Haverford artist who has taught here and in Israel, seeks to share with the world through www.shoahletters.org . As the name implies, her nearly year-old website archives letters written primarily from 1938 to 1941 by family members, many of whom perished in the Holocaust; but also photographs, documents such as Nazi-acquired asset inventories, family biographies, and historic maps.
NEWS
September 24, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
At his East Camden home, Phil Cohen was tearing up a floor as part of a kitchen renovation in 1982 when he discovered the old newspapers under the linoleum. Their stories and ads from February 1942 painted a fascinating picture of a Camden that no longer existed - with movie theaters, new-car dealerships, and major grocery stores. Cohen was enthralled. He held on to the papers - copies of the Camden Courier-Post and a weekly shopper - and decided to "do something with them someday.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|