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NEWS
February 23, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than one million people are expected to flood the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in September to try to get even a speck-size glimpse of Pope Francis. But there's an easier way. Organizers are selling life-size cutouts of His Holiness. For $120 (that's the 25 percent-off price available through Saturday), you can own a "life-size standee" of Pope Francis. The World Meeting of Families, the organization fund-raising and hosting a weeklong Catholic conference and the papal visit, is also selling tabletop papal cutouts for $15, an I [heart]
SPORTS
February 20, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
WHEN IT COMES to youth sports, the world has gone mad. There are reality TV shows such as "Friday Night Tykes," in which peewee football players are screamed at by out-of-their-mind adult coaches. There are Little League teams that cheat. High school kids hold televised news conferences to announce their college choices. Seventh- and eighth-graders are receiving scholarship offers from colleges. And now this: Recruiting website Rivals.com has started providing scouting reports for two sixth-grade football players from New England.
NEWS
February 12, 2015 | Mensah M. Dean & Wendy Ruderman, Daily News Staff Writers
SOME 13 YEARS AGO, the Daily News alerted state Sen. Anthony Williams that he hadn't actually graduated from college, despite assertions on his official state Senate website. Wednesday, the Daily News again helped jog the senator's memory about his educational background, informing Williams of an error on his mayoral campaign website. In fact, Williams didn't graduate from Franklin & Marshall College and then go into business and then into politics, as stated on his website, anthonyhwilliams.com . When asked about the wording of the bio, Williams' campaign spokesman, Albert Butler, said, "It's a simple oversight and it can be easily corrected.
NEWS
January 28, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Supporters of Philadelphia City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson won't find information on his reelection bid at KenyattaJohnson.com. Or KenyattaJohnson.net. Or KenyattaJohnson.org. All three are active addresses - but they immediately redirect to the website for the man who seeks to oust him from his Second District seat, Ori Feibush. Feibush on Monday acknowledged snatching up the names, but said he wasn't being petty. Instead, he said, he was being practical, steering voters - including those seeking information about Johnson - to his platform.
NEWS
December 30, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tom Casey continuously fields calls and e-mails from anxious people asking about pipeline projects and safety, and the meaning of a right of way. So Casey, of West Goshen, who helped start the Chester County Community Coalition to spread information about pipelines, turns to the county's online Pipeline Information Center. Fortunately for Casey and others interested, Chester County officials recently got a $50,000 federal grant to add information to the website and to name a point of contact to increase information-sharing among residents, municipalities, and pipeline companies.
NEWS
December 29, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A cash-strapped charter school with two Philadelphia campuses has notified parents it plans to close for good this week. But officials from the School District of Philadelphia said Saturday night the decision was news to them. In a notice posted on the school's website, administrators at the Walter D. Palmer Leadership Learning Partners Charter School said its board had voted to permanently close the school Wednesday after months of financial turmoil. The words permanently close were in red. A letter dated Friday was sent out to parents with information about reenrolling their children at other schools.
NEWS
December 28, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was 2006 when Joy Stocke and Kimberly Nagy did the unthinkable: They essentially converted the highly regarded literary magazine the Bucks County Writer - founded in 1998 and published by the Writers Room of Bucks County - to an online journal. "We were told we were going to fail," Stocke recalled. In reality, failure was the likely outcome if the magazine remained in print form, she said. "We could no longer afford to distribute print," said Stocke, 57, who, as a literary journalist, author, and community organizer of writers, took over the Doylestown-based nonprofit Bucks County Writer in May 2003, editing it until the winter of 2006.
NEWS
December 21, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
When 2-year-old Brandon Schultz of Bryn Mawr was diagnosed with autism in 2009, his mother, Jean, was devastated. "You never think it's going to happen to you," she says. But since those early days, Schultz, 44, a cardiac clinical care specialist, has become an advocate for finding a cure for and the causes of autism spectrum disorder. She speaks to parents and clinicians on her experience, and has enrolled Brandon in several clinical trials at the Center for Autism Research at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
December 8, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tom "Chico" Stafford is an imposing figure - both physically, at 5-foot-10, 240 pounds, and by what comes out of his mouth. He apologizes for cursing but says he gets frustrated with his African American community. What especially riles the 64-year-old serial entrepreneur are those who ask for handouts and those who allow money to define them. The latter has happened to hip-hop culture, Stafford said, with rappers whose lyrics degrade women and celebrate drugs and gross consumerism getting all the attention - and a good deal of sales.
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Rubbing shoulders with superstar athletes can be thrilling for mere mortals like myself. (I ran junior-varsity cross-country as a high school senior. Not kidding.) But can professional athletes teach us management skills? Keep your expectations within reason. Increasingly, Philadelphia financial firms are corralling sports executives, professional athletes, and coaches to speak, with the idea that "behind-the-scrimmage line" backstories will uncover secrets to success. Maybe, maybe not. But it's an experience for which Philadelphians are paying big bucks.
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