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Wedding Cake

NEWS
August 18, 1999 | TAMMY McGINLEY / Inquirer Suburban Staff
At Pisker's Bakery on Delsea Drive in Westville, a wedding cake waits in a window as customer Ann Civalier of Deptford heads out the door into the sunshine, having settled for a more modest purchase of simply cookies. Catering to those with a sweet tooth, the bakery has been in business offering confections to the community for decades. It opened in 1925 and has had three owners - its current one is David Critch.
NEWS
May 17, 1999 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
At 56, Cecilia Riley had long ago quit waiting for Prince Charming to show up with a glass slipper. She figured he was dead or just not interested. So, instead of hanging out at balls, Riley made plans to retire, sell her house in East Falls and move to Arizona. Then, one day, he showed up - her own bright, shining prince. He didn't gallop in on a white horse, but he does live in Arizona, which for Riley is even better. They got engaged in October. Since their meeting, Riley has told and retold the story of her whirlwind summer romance with Dwight Bandy, the courtly divorced man she met at her daughter's graduation.
NEWS
September 27, 1998 | By Monica Yant, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Back in 1991, when Loretta Huslin was about to get married for the first time, she wanted a ceremony that would be quiet and romantic yet a bit offbeat. She wanted a Friday night wedding. Her family, her friends, even her fiance were appalled. Nobody got married on a weekday. So, as it turned out, neither did Loretta Huslin. Last December, when she married for the second time, she got the Friday wedding she wanted - and, to her relief, "everybody loved the idea," said Huslin, 29, a graphic designer from Hainesport, N.J. But the icing on the wedding cake was the cost.
NEWS
May 31, 1997 | By LEONARD PITTS JR
"Them, too?" That's the disbelieving question I asked when Marilyn told me about some friends of ours whose marriage is falling apart. I don't know why I'm surprised; lately it seems like every couple we know is splitting up. My wife seems to take it in stride, better able than I to accept that these things happen. I guess I'm naive. Guess I've listened to too many love songs. Not that I can still hear them as I did when I was young. There is an edge of lamentation now that I didn't catch back then, a scrim of bitter sharpening the sweet.
LIVING
December 9, 1996 | By Kathy Boccella, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nothing brings back memories like an old wedding picture. When William Cox wants to reminisce, he has hundreds of photos to choose from. An industrial photographer, Cox spent many a Saturday afternoon at his side job - shooting weddings - before his retirement. Since suffering a stroke last year, his memory has been a little fuzzy. But when he looks at all those brides and grooms, decked out in frothy wedding outfits and smiling shyly at the camera, the memories start flooding back.
NEWS
September 23, 1996 | By Douglas Herbert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The festivities began with a solemn reading by a doughty Dixie matron of nuptial dos and don'ts, circa 1863: "A pig running in front of the bride is a sign of evil. " "Old shoes should be thrown at the bride to chase away misfortune. " "The bride should never bake her own cake. . . . " Not that anyone stood on ceremony at this event, a freewheeling retro-wedding where the bride wore green, the groom cut the cake with a saber, and half the guests dragged muskets across enemy lines just to attend.
LIVING
August 30, 1996 | By W. Speers Inquirer staff writer Michael Klein contributed to this article. The article also contains material from the Associated Press, Reuters, the Washington Post and USA Today
Roger Moore, addressing the first World Congress Against Commercial Sexual Exploi-tation of Children yesterday in Stockholm, told of how a pedophile came on to him at a Cub Scouts trip when he was 8. "He sort of said I had nice knees, which I thought was a bit peculiar," the actor said. "I left the tent and I was sitting on a branch, and after a couple of minutes he came out and he made another suggestive remark about my anatomy. . . . He made a grab and I just rolled backwards over the branch and ran off. " Speaking as a UNICEF goodwill ambassador, Moore, 68, said the incident influenced his decision to work for children's rights.
FOOD
August 28, 1996 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Henry Haller witnessed a significant period of American - and world - history from a unique perspective. For starters, his 22 years as White House executive chef gave him a longer view of events there than any of the five presidents - Johnson, Nixon, Ford, Carter and Reagan - he served. Beyond that, in addition to satisfying five unique presidential palates, the Swiss-born chef survived five very different and demanding first ladies. That alone could fuel a talk show or two if the chef were any less a gentleman.
NEWS
February 26, 1996 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For 20 years, Mikki Viereck sang at weddings. Mothers always cried to her. "You sing, 'Daddy's Little Girl,' " they would sob. "Why don't you have a song for us?" You raise a boy, nurse him, diaper him, throw his muddy clothes in the washer, but when he weds, the mother of the groom becomes a wedding wallflower. This was a cruel fact that Mikki Viereck had come to know. Daddy got to dance with his little girl, but what about Mom? There was no wedding song for mothers and sons.
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