CollectionsWeeds
IN THE NEWS

Weeds

FIND MORE STORIES »
FEATURED ARTICLES
FOOD
June 1, 1988 | By SAM GUGINO, Special to the Daily News
Pop psychologist Wayne Dyer once said, "The difference between a flower and a weed is a judgment. Flowers really aren't better, just different. " Sioux Baldwin thinks that weeds are every bit as good as flowers. As a matter of fact, she doesn't even call them weeds. Thy're all plants to her. Baldwin is a naturalist at the Andorra Natural Area in the far northwestern tip of Fairmount Park. The Andorra Natural Area is one of the many natural treasures of the park where you can go on bird walks, insect walks, explore the Wissahickon Creek, or help dig a pond fpr frogs.
NEWS
December 4, 2009 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
The overgrown meadow at Bartram's Garden has been a nettlesome project. What to do about all those weeds? A controlled burn is the preferred way to manage it, but Bartram's is in a dense, urban neighborhood and burning is illegal in Philadelphia. Chemical treatments are an option, but the stewards of this historic site on the Schuylkill's west bank felt herbicides should be a last resort. And so the jokes, then serious talk, turned to goats, nature's weed-eaters, for whom a 15-acre field knotted with Canada thistle, mugwort, and vetch isn't a problem at all. It's a smorgasbord, one that's increasingly being offered to goats around the country as a natural way of ridding parks, hillsides, vacant lots, and pastures of overgrown brush and tenacious weeds.
NEWS
May 31, 1986
Once again the warm weather has arrived. Grass, weeds, trees are growing fast. Once again the center plots on certain streets are almost two feet tall and will grow taller and taller before the city gets around to cutting them. This will be about August or September. When the grass is cut, it will be just left to lie in the gutters as usual. Castor Avenue above Cottman is a disgrace. The center strip has weeds growing in all the cracks and the gutters are filled with dirt and cigarette butts.
NEWS
December 29, 1991 | By Alison F. Orenstein, Special to The Inquirer
Officials in Oaklyn, who say they have complained for months about the way Conrail has maintained the property around its tracks in the borough, will meet with representatives of the freight railroad company next month in an attempt to devise a maintenance agreement. Until the summer of 1990, Oaklyn employees trimmed the weeds and grass along the railroad tracks where they passed through Oaklyn. The borough would then bill Conrail for the work. Last year, the bill amounted to $1,800, according to an Oaklyn official.
NEWS
June 25, 1989 | By Adrienne Beard, Special to The Inquirer
After winning a skirmish against junk vehicles, East Fallowfield supervisors are continuing efforts to clean up the township by targeting weeds. "We're getting rid of the wrecked cars, and now we're going to go after the guy who doesn't mow his lawn," said Supervisor Ronald Scott. His comment came after Douglas Lambert, a property owner in the township for 40 years, was ordered to clean up his Route 82 property by District Justice Eugene DiFilippo of Kennett Square. For months, the township has been citing Lambert for his junk vehicles.
LIVING
August 27, 1999 | By Betsey Hansell, FOR THE INQUIRER
Taking pride of place in my garden is a monumental candelabrum of a plant with handsome red branches, tipped with arching clusters of greenish buds. I've been cosseting it all summer, waiting for it to burst into fabulous bloom. I haven't been sure what those blooms would look like, though, because, not recognizing the plant, I just assumed it was one of the new perennials whose labels got lost in the hubbub of gardening. Now I know. They'll be tiny, ugly and hairy. And they'll produce - or have been producing all summer - about 150,000 seeds that can sleep in my dirt for up to 40 years without losing their capacity to reproduce.
NEWS
February 3, 2012 | By Dean Fosdick, Associated Press
Hand weeding is one of the most demanding chores in gardening, but it doesn't have to be that way. Mulching, spraying, plant crowding, and inexpensive stand-up tools can ease much of the back-straining work. And the time to plan for it is now, before you use any of that homemade compost or build your budget for planting supplies. "Weed control is personal," said Barb Pierson, nursery manager for White Flower Farm, a mail-order nursery in Litchfield, Conn. "To me, there are two types of weeds.
NEWS
February 4, 1990 | By Kathleen Martin Beans, Special to The Inquirer
The waist-high weeds at the bankrupt Victoria Place development may continue to grow - at least for the time being. At a hearing Wednesday in District Court, Warwick Township tried to force developer John S. Seal Jr. to pay to have the weeds mowed. But District Justice Robert A. Schnell ruled that Seal could not be held personally responsible for the obligations of the bankrupt development company, Sovereign Estates Ltd. Schnell, however, told him at one point: "Whether it's in bankruptcy or not, there should be something done to get that horrible situation cleaned up. It's really an eyesore.
SPORTS
April 25, 1988 | By TED SILARY, Daily News Sports Writer
One might say that Temple's Ralph Jarvis came out of nowhere to surface yesterday as the Chicago Bears' third-round selection (No. 78 overall) in the NFL draft. Kind of like weeds come out of nowhere. What do weeds have to do with football? Everything - at least in relation to Ralph Jarvis, a 6-6, 250-pound defensive end. It is August 1982 and Jarvis, who attended Germantown High as a freshman and sophomore but never played sports, is newly arrived on the campus of Glen Mills, a boarding school in Delaware County for court-adjudicated youths.
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | By John Ellis, Special to The Inquirer
Weeds rise everywhere around the maroon-and-white sign. Soon they will obscure its message: "A Landmark Country Club Community on an Arnold Palmer Designed Golf Course. " Just beyond is a partially finished bridge, a grand entranceway to a grand development. In the distance, cement storm drains mark what would have been asphalt streets, but the landscape they dot is one of orange plastic-mesh construction fences, discarded building materials and weeds. Three structures - two single-family homes and a townhouse unit - sit empty, the few remaining landmarks of a once-august dream.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
LAST SUMMER, Blair Shaw, an attorney who lives in Brewerytown, regularly walked his dog, Bailey, past a dense weed jungle on Master Street near 27th, unaware that in 2011 it had been Marathon Farm, an oasis of veggies in an urban food desert. Its motto: "Spreading the Love: one carrot at a time!" But by 2013, the Marathon Grill restaurant chain, which had cleared the third-of-an-acre lot and created Marathon Farm with such high hopes, suffered financial setbacks and pulled out. By last summer, the raised wood-frame beds had deteriorated and disappeared in the tall weeds, leaving no clue of their brief "one carrot at a time" history.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2015 | By Sally McCabe, For The Inquirer
Learn your weeds.   This week, weeds seem to be taking over the world. Ground cleared of one weed in the morning seems to fill with another by nightfall. Here's the secret: weed seeds need light. Say that three times fast. Clear away weeds from a bed, and then instantly cover the ground with some sort of mulch to block light from the soil. Weeds may spring from roots you missed, but very few new weeds will pop up from seeds, except where soil is exposed. Search and destroy.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
"THIS IS NOT a stoner event," N.A. Poe said yesterday while proudly sporting a tank top depicting marijuana buds, cigars and joints arranged in the shape of the American flag. "It's a direct action by stoners to raise awareness and make progress. " Nearly 200 people assembled in LOVE Park yesterday for Smoke Down Prohibition 2.0: Free the Weed, a protest calling for the legalization of the herb by the federal government. The group gathered at 4 p.m., some toting homemade signs and banners, others bringing more creative props, like one man's six-foot tall "bong.
NEWS
July 3, 2015
D EAR ABBY: I have been with "Tom" for two years, and I suspect that he will be proposing soon. He is 27 and I'm 24. Here's the problem: He wants our parents to meet before he asks. Abby, I have put this off because I'm sure they will have nothing in common. My parents are small-business owners and conservative. His parents are pot-smoking swingers - literally. How do I prepare my parents (and myself) for what I expect to be a tense and uncomfortable meeting? Should I suggest talking points?
NEWS
May 8, 2015
YOU AND I walk through the woods and we see trees and bushes and thorny things. Tess Hooper, a young environmental educator at the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education, in Upper Roxborough, sees the makings of a fine beer. "This is a staghorn sumac," she said, nodding toward the kind of tree I've seen sprout dozens of times on vacant lots. "It bears these red cones that are like fruit. You could make beer with them. " Hmm . . . I must've missed that merit badge in Boy Scouts.
NEWS
January 25, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a dealer of paintings and prints, Nathan Isen specialized in selling Warhols, Dalís, and the works of other modern artists to Main Line connoisseurs and investors nationwide. But when a less-than-savory customer showed up at his storefront with $20,000 in cash - bound in rubber bands, stuffed in a brown paper bag, and reeking of marijuana - Isen didn't turn her away. In fact, federal prosecutors said Friday, the 61-year-old art dealer, whose I. Brewster & Co. gallery is a Museum Row mainstay, proved only too accommodating.
NEWS
August 7, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
WHATEVER CHANCE it had of gaining Mayor Nutter's support, City Council's small-amount-of-marijuana bill may have been lost in a media skirmish between the mayor and Councilman Jim Kenney. Both politicos have upped their fervor both for and against a measure that would give police officers the discretion to write a ticket carrying a $25 fine for possessors of an ounce of weed or less. "My problem is his arrogance relating to this issue. It is astounding, and clearly he has not been living in the real world for the last 5 1/2 to six years," Kenney said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2014 | By Patricia Schrieber, Inquirer Columnist
Harvest dill. Dill is an herb known to aid digestion, flavor a variety of dishes, and in old times, ward off evil spirits. Now that dill has flowered and is about to set seed, this is just the right time to harvest the leaves before they turn yellow. Although I grew dill several times in past years, my harvested leaves always became moldy and never dried properly. As a result, I gave up growing it until this spring when a gardening friend suggested I harvest the green leaves, put them in a plastic bag and freeze them.
NEWS
June 21, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage and Jason Grant, Inquirer Staff Writers
Don't light up in public just yet, tokers - pot's still illegal. But Philadelphia is poised to join a rising number of state and local governments after City Council voted, 13-3, Thursday to substantially lessen the penalties for possessing small amounts of marijuana. People caught with less than about an ounce would be issued a citation and fined $25, but not arrested. The apparently veto-proof majority adopted a measure that advocates say will free police to handle more-important duties, and help African American residents who have been penalized disproportionately.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|