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Welfare

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NEWS
June 13, 1994 | BY ELLEN A. HARLEY
What took so long? After seven years as governor, Robert Casey has concluded - at long last - that welfare in Pennsylvania is costly and ineffective. In a budget compromise, Casey has agreed to cut a broad range of welfare benefits. This would save taxpayers about $91 million next year, and up to $110 million in later years. In late March, Casey also announced he wanted to direct about $28 million into job training and education for people who lose their welfare checks.
NEWS
July 3, 1989
Is it love or money? Maybe it's just the love of money that leads all those pinstriped lawyers, investment bankers and consultants to descend on every campaign fund-raising cocktail party. In Philadelphia, pinstripe welfare has become an important growth industry. What you know is often irrelevant. It's who you know that counts when contracts for legal, investment and consulting services are handed out in City Hall. Just go to the right fund-raiser, contribute your "fair share" to the campaign kitty, and wait for your turn as the gravy train passes by. This is how millions get passed around for people with that rare skill of manipulating other people's money.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
 NADYA "OCTOMOM" SULEMAN may have been caught with her hand in the cookie jar due to her other hand being in her honey pot. TMZ.com reports that evidence is mounting that Octo scammed taxpayers by committing welfare fraud after authorities found pay stubs from her work in self-gratification porn. The Los Angeles County Department of Welfare and Fraud seized Octo's financial records and said that she'd been overpaid $15,683 in welfare money from January to May of this year.
NEWS
August 23, 1994 | BY GREGORY APELIAN
I was pleasantly surprised by your excellent editorial (Aug. 5) on welfare "reform," titled "Reweaving safety net for the needy. " As an activist minister in South Jersey for 10 years, I worked with the Florio administration to lend much needed grass-roots input to facilitate a truer reform process. Now, as a resident of the City of Brotherly (and Sisterly) Love, I am compelled to share with your readership and my new neighbors what I gleaned by the process. First, while I agree that welfare is part of a system of unintentional institutional bondage and self-esteem erosion leading to hopelessness, a myriad of complexities need to be addressed, especially regarding people who are genuinely limited in their ability to generate income.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1987 | By GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Looking at Aldora Fitzhugh in her smart, blue business suit, it's hard to picture her as a South Philadelphia welfare mother with a spotty work history and virtually no hope of finding a decent job. Yet just over a year ago, that's exactly where she found herself. "Every day I'd get up and say, 'I'm going to get a job today.' But every day, it'd be the same old thing. No experience, no job," said Fitzhugh, 33, who has two sons. "People think you're happy just sitting on your welfare check, but that's not true.
NEWS
January 14, 2010 | By Spencer Rand
My client told me he was living on food stamps and a monthly state welfare check for $205 - the most a person in need could get in 1996. He couldn't walk without horrible pain, as his leg had not healed properly since he broke it in several places a few years before. He had always worked on his feet and didn't think he could work again, though he had not been able to prove this to the federal government's satisfaction. If we could prove it and get him Social Security or Supplemental Security Income benefits, we could more than double his income.
NEWS
August 20, 1989 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes, Special to The Inquirer
Life looked bleak for LarStella Irby Parker eight years ago. She was a college student who had suddenly become an unemployed single parent receiving public assistance and living nearly 3,000 miles from her Mount Holly family. "I was really starting to go downhill," Parker said during a telephone interview from Los Angeles, where she has lived for 12 years. But she managed to turn her life around and start a Christian magazine for business people, "Not Forsaking the Assembling," in 1984.
NEWS
April 18, 1995
When I attended nursing school, I became a welfare recipient. I was very grateful for the money, food stamps and free medical care I received for myself and my sons. However, I did not live a life of luxury! I counted every penny. I did not stand in the grocery line with a shopping cart full of exotic foods, nor did I wear leather and fur. Being on welfare and having babies does not set you up for life, as Bill Ray (letter April 5) states. I am no longer on welfare. My sons are men now. One attends college and the other is in the Army.
NEWS
October 23, 1988 | By Kitty Dumas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kathy had been on welfare for eight years when she met Bonnie Kassof. She was a clerical volunteer in the Public Assistance Office on Frankford Avenue when Kassof would come in to talk to women on welfare about something many of them had little hope for - a career. At first, Kathy wasn't buying it. She wasn't about to be fooled by a lot of promises. But Kassof was different. She had been on welfare and knew what it was like and how it felt. And that's what she told Kathy.
NEWS
December 7, 1994 | By CLAUDE LEWIS
I am in almost full agreement with incoming House Speaker Newt Gingrich on the issue of welfare. He is absolutely correct when he argues that "giving permanent aid to anyone destroys them. " What a profound observation! I'm for cutting welfare too, but only if we begin at the top where the greatest offenders live - like, say, members of the U.S. Congress. Far too many of the idealistic men and women who go to Washington on their promises "to make things better" end up compromising themselves and wind up living privileged lives along with many of their colleagues.
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NEWS
April 18, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
In accepting the Democratic nomination for president in 1992, Bill Clinton promised to "end welfare as we know it. " "We will say to those on welfare: You will have, and you deserve, the opportunity, through training and education, through child care and medical coverage, to liberate yourself. But then, when you can, you must work, because welfare should be a second chance, not a way of life. " Republicans agreed with Clinton on that, if little else, and welfare reform became a reality in 1996.
NEWS
February 7, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Erik Hendricks, 71, of Haverford, a former staff member and longtime executive director of the Pennsylvania SPCA, died Friday, Jan. 30, of leukemia at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Mr. Hendricks' tenure with the animal welfare group ran from 1976 to 2007, and he helped create and implement some of the signature programs and services the PSPCA offers. He also advocated at the state level for stricter laws to protect animals from cruelty and abuse. "We are proud to have had Erik as part of our history, and we honor his commitment to our lifesaving mission," said Jerry Buckley, CEO of the PSPCA.
NEWS
September 7, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
WHEN YOU WORK within the system, you apparently learn how to exploit it. Three Social Security Administration employees are at the center of a massive fraud scheme that netted over $76,000 in welfare benefits, said Tasha Jamerson, a spokeswoman for the District Attorney's Office. Sakeenah Belle, 31, Chanae Thomas, 31, and Felicia Fernandez, 30, are accused of using their positions with the SSA to submit false documents that underreported their annual incomes and allowed them to gain eligibility for welfare benefits, medical assistance and subsidized child care, Jamerson said.
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A legal fight between a Moorestown woman and Burlington County animal welfare workers ended in Municipal Court on Wednesday when 66 charges were dismissed. The charges - 33 criminal and 33 civil - against Kate Decker alleged that she neglected her dogs, because some did not have water. Investigators also said some stacked crates did not have a barrier between the top and bottom, as required by law. Decker, 69, a widow,  cares for rescued animals, mostly dogs, in her home and garage.
NEWS
November 25, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's controversial ex-welfare secretary has a new gig. The State of Maine has hired Gary Alexander's consulting firm to study the state's Medicaid system and examine Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act. The contract is worth nearly $1 million. Alexander's stormy, two-year tenure in the Corbett administration was marked by deep cuts to social service programs serving the disabled, the elderly, women, and children. Alexander also opposed expansion of Medicaid.
NEWS
October 24, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Corbett administration official said she is "rethinking" the food-stamp asset test, a controversial measure that ties the federal benefits people receive to their bank accounts and car ownership. Department of Public Welfare Secretary Beverly Mackereth made the statement during a meeting with The Inquirer's editorial board Tuesday. Her remark represents a potential sea change in how the administration views dealing with the poor, advocates say. "We are thrilled," said Julie Zaebst, policy manager for the Greater Philadelphia Coalition Against Hunger.
NEWS
September 17, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The state of Pennsylvania has denied as many as eight of every 10 applications for cash welfare in 2013, a major increase over previous years, an Inquirer review of Department of Public Welfare figures shows. It's a pattern being repeated in 17 other states. The increased rate of denials coincides with a change in state law. Before Pennsylvanians apply for welfare, they now must seek at least three jobs and document their efforts. Critics contend that the ultimate goal of the new rule, known as pre-approval work search, is to stymie applicants from getting welfare by making the process harder.
NEWS
August 10, 2013 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police Officer Teresa Sanchious wiped away tears Thursday, struggling with emotion as she told a jury she wished she had done more to save 3-year-old Jaquinn Brewton. Taking the stand on the third day of the trial of Jaquinn's godmother, Nadera Batson - charged with beating Jaquinn to death in a filthy West Philadelphia apartment in 2011 - Sanchious said she and her partner saw Batson pushing Jaquinn in his stroller through a Rite Aid parking lot just days before the boy's fatal beating.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
 NADYA "OCTOMOM" SULEMAN may have been caught with her hand in the cookie jar due to her other hand being in her honey pot. TMZ.com reports that evidence is mounting that Octo scammed taxpayers by committing welfare fraud after authorities found pay stubs from her work in self-gratification porn. The Los Angeles County Department of Welfare and Fraud seized Octo's financial records and said that she'd been overpaid $15,683 in welfare money from January to May of this year.
NEWS
July 28, 2013 | By Josh Fatzick, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - A proposal to change the name of Department of Public Welfare became an eleventh-hour casualty of the budget process. So for now, Pennsylvania remains one of only two states that still uses welfare in the title of the agency that oversees programs for low-income residents. This fall, supporters will urge the Senate to consider legislation already approved by the House that would rename the agency the Department of Human Services. Bill sponsor Rep. Tom Murt (R., Montgomery)
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