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Welfare

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NEWS
June 13, 1994 | BY ELLEN A. HARLEY
What took so long? After seven years as governor, Robert Casey has concluded - at long last - that welfare in Pennsylvania is costly and ineffective. In a budget compromise, Casey has agreed to cut a broad range of welfare benefits. This would save taxpayers about $91 million next year, and up to $110 million in later years. In late March, Casey also announced he wanted to direct about $28 million into job training and education for people who lose their welfare checks.
NEWS
July 3, 1989
Is it love or money? Maybe it's just the love of money that leads all those pinstriped lawyers, investment bankers and consultants to descend on every campaign fund-raising cocktail party. In Philadelphia, pinstripe welfare has become an important growth industry. What you know is often irrelevant. It's who you know that counts when contracts for legal, investment and consulting services are handed out in City Hall. Just go to the right fund-raiser, contribute your "fair share" to the campaign kitty, and wait for your turn as the gravy train passes by. This is how millions get passed around for people with that rare skill of manipulating other people's money.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
 NADYA "OCTOMOM" SULEMAN may have been caught with her hand in the cookie jar due to her other hand being in her honey pot. TMZ.com reports that evidence is mounting that Octo scammed taxpayers by committing welfare fraud after authorities found pay stubs from her work in self-gratification porn. The Los Angeles County Department of Welfare and Fraud seized Octo's financial records and said that she'd been overpaid $15,683 in welfare money from January to May of this year.
NEWS
August 23, 1994 | BY GREGORY APELIAN
I was pleasantly surprised by your excellent editorial (Aug. 5) on welfare "reform," titled "Reweaving safety net for the needy. " As an activist minister in South Jersey for 10 years, I worked with the Florio administration to lend much needed grass-roots input to facilitate a truer reform process. Now, as a resident of the City of Brotherly (and Sisterly) Love, I am compelled to share with your readership and my new neighbors what I gleaned by the process. First, while I agree that welfare is part of a system of unintentional institutional bondage and self-esteem erosion leading to hopelessness, a myriad of complexities need to be addressed, especially regarding people who are genuinely limited in their ability to generate income.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1987 | By GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Looking at Aldora Fitzhugh in her smart, blue business suit, it's hard to picture her as a South Philadelphia welfare mother with a spotty work history and virtually no hope of finding a decent job. Yet just over a year ago, that's exactly where she found herself. "Every day I'd get up and say, 'I'm going to get a job today.' But every day, it'd be the same old thing. No experience, no job," said Fitzhugh, 33, who has two sons. "People think you're happy just sitting on your welfare check, but that's not true.
NEWS
January 14, 2010 | By Spencer Rand
My client told me he was living on food stamps and a monthly state welfare check for $205 - the most a person in need could get in 1996. He couldn't walk without horrible pain, as his leg had not healed properly since he broke it in several places a few years before. He had always worked on his feet and didn't think he could work again, though he had not been able to prove this to the federal government's satisfaction. If we could prove it and get him Social Security or Supplemental Security Income benefits, we could more than double his income.
NEWS
August 20, 1989 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes, Special to The Inquirer
Life looked bleak for LarStella Irby Parker eight years ago. She was a college student who had suddenly become an unemployed single parent receiving public assistance and living nearly 3,000 miles from her Mount Holly family. "I was really starting to go downhill," Parker said during a telephone interview from Los Angeles, where she has lived for 12 years. But she managed to turn her life around and start a Christian magazine for business people, "Not Forsaking the Assembling," in 1984.
NEWS
April 18, 1995
When I attended nursing school, I became a welfare recipient. I was very grateful for the money, food stamps and free medical care I received for myself and my sons. However, I did not live a life of luxury! I counted every penny. I did not stand in the grocery line with a shopping cart full of exotic foods, nor did I wear leather and fur. Being on welfare and having babies does not set you up for life, as Bill Ray (letter April 5) states. I am no longer on welfare. My sons are men now. One attends college and the other is in the Army.
NEWS
October 23, 1988 | By Kitty Dumas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kathy had been on welfare for eight years when she met Bonnie Kassof. She was a clerical volunteer in the Public Assistance Office on Frankford Avenue when Kassof would come in to talk to women on welfare about something many of them had little hope for - a career. At first, Kathy wasn't buying it. She wasn't about to be fooled by a lot of promises. But Kassof was different. She had been on welfare and knew what it was like and how it felt. And that's what she told Kathy.
NEWS
December 7, 1994 | By CLAUDE LEWIS
I am in almost full agreement with incoming House Speaker Newt Gingrich on the issue of welfare. He is absolutely correct when he argues that "giving permanent aid to anyone destroys them. " What a profound observation! I'm for cutting welfare too, but only if we begin at the top where the greatest offenders live - like, say, members of the U.S. Congress. Far too many of the idealistic men and women who go to Washington on their promises "to make things better" end up compromising themselves and wind up living privileged lives along with many of their colleagues.
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NEWS
July 13, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas and Jeremy Roebuck, STAFF WRITERS
Health club memberships, political contributions, and $3,000 line-dancing lessons are among the expenses that a well-connected Philadelphia lobbyist is accused of illegally charging to a state grant program meant to help welfare recipients land steady jobs. Now, Melonease Shaw - who has at times worked as the city's lobbyist in Harrisburg, and who was, until her arrest, seeking the job again - faces a court hearing next week on charges including theft, deceptive business practices, and tampering with public records.
NEWS
June 4, 2016
ISSUE | CHILD WELFARE A reason for change I applaud social worker SaraKay Smullens' commentary about the Philadelphia Department of Human Services and the city's reaction to the downgrading of DHS's license because of failures in our system. Smullens' approach is refreshing: Use this rebuke to improve our system, not to spend money we don't have arguing about whether the downgrade is warranted. As a pediatrician in Philadelphia for more than 30 years, I know - as do the many others who work with our most vulnerable citizens - that the goodwill and hard work of most of the DHS staff are not sufficient when caseloads are too heavy, services are fragmented and limited, and support - financial and philosophical - is inadequate.
NEWS
May 4, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
Seven child-welfare workers in Philadelphia were fired in February and March in connection with at least two false reports about home visits, according to state officials. Rachel Kostelac, a spokeswoman for the state Department of Human Services, said three were workers from Community Umbrella Agencies contracted by the city to handle cases, and four were with subcontracted foster-care agencies. The report of the firings followed remarks Friday by a state DHS official, who said child-welfare workers in Philadelphia had falsified reports in response to high caseloads.
NEWS
April 27, 2016
Nathan Benefield is vice president of policy for the Commonwealth Foundation Conservatives loathe government handouts. Liberals denounce special favors to corporations. One thing can unify these two sides: ending Pennsylvania's budget-busting corporate-welfare handouts. Every year, state government gives millions in taxpayer dollars to favored businesses under the guise of "economic development. " In reality, these giveaways represent political development, enriching special interests and their well-connected lobbyists.
NEWS
December 28, 2015 | By Colin Deppen, PENNLIVE.COM (Harrisburg)
GORDONVILLE, Pa. - Humane Officer Jen Nields knocks on a door of the suspected puppy mill in Gordonville and steps back. She fidgets with a notebook and peers through a covered glass panel looking for signs of life. Then she waits. The setting around her is breathtaking: lush Dutch Country farmland at sunset, a sea of gold and green. It is also ground zero for a culture and information war still raging in the mid-state after years of soul-searching and debate. "A lot of people don't understand when I say, 'We [Lancaster County]
NEWS
November 13, 2015
WE ARE HEADING toward the holiday that encourages gluttony. Supermarkets are already overstocking their shelves with traditional Thanksgiving food items. But in many homes, there will be people who won't have a traditional Thanksgiving dinner or a meal at all that day. How many of us stuff ourselves on Thanksgiving not fully appreciating that many people regularly go hungry, scraping by on a few dollars a day? Typically at the beginning of the month, I select a personal finance book with wisdom or strategies to help individuals improve their financial situation.
NEWS
October 28, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
AS A NAVY MAN, Chuck Coleman traveled extensively, but it did not interfere with his religious duties. In fact, the travel helped propel him into greater church responsibilities. He served churches in Hawaii and in South Carolina, and became assistant chaplain at the Navy Chapel in Rota, Spain. Also, while still in the Navy, he attained a degree from Thomas Edison State College in Trenton. Later, after leaving the Navy, he received a master's degree from Widener University in Chester.
NEWS
September 15, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
A CROSSING guard with a college education? Why not? For Joyce Elaine Adams, guiding schoolchildren across dangerous streets was just one more career choice for a woman who devoted her life to caring for others. A 31-year employee of the Department of Public Welfare, where she worked with families in need of her caring and compassion, she retired to the corner of 20th Street and Washington Avenue in South Philadelphia to help kids cross the street. "She formed loving relationships with all of the residents and schoolchildren she came in contact with," her family said.
NEWS
May 16, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A state audit of three county welfare agencies - in Burlington, Camden, and Passaic - found them lacking in proper documentation for benefits and urged closer attention to verification of recipients. The audit, performed by the Office of the State Comptroller, pertained to General Assistance, which provides state-funded monthly grants to eligible single adults or couples without children. The recipients are supposed to work, be actively looking for work, or participate in an approved work activity, including community service.
NEWS
April 18, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
In accepting the Democratic nomination for president in 1992, Bill Clinton promised to "end welfare as we know it. " "We will say to those on welfare: You will have, and you deserve, the opportunity, through training and education, through child care and medical coverage, to liberate yourself. But then, when you can, you must work, because welfare should be a second chance, not a way of life. " Republicans agreed with Clinton on that, if little else, and welfare reform became a reality in 1996.
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