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Welfare Reform

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NEWS
June 7, 1999 | BY CHERI HONKALA
The Kensington Welfare Rights Union, an organization of poor people whose families are being devastated by welfare reform, is encouraged by the recent focus on welfare reform by the Daily News. But "Success in Welfareland" (June 2) tells only part of the story. Welfare reform is not and will not be a success in Kensington or anywhere else in the city. People have said welfare recipients are "in denial" about welfare cuts. The entire city is in denial about the growing crisis of hunger and homelessness.
NEWS
September 13, 1995
If in 10 years' time we find children sleeping on grates, picked up in the morning frozen, and ask why are they here . . . will anyone remember how it began? It begins now, predicted Sen. Daniel P. Moynihan, D-N.Y., as he surveyed the state of the legislation ludicrously termed welfare reform. It begins if the U.S. Senate this week votes to renege on the nation's responsibility to protect millions of poor children - a responsibility it has legally acknowledged for 60 years.
NEWS
October 24, 1988 | By JUNE AXINN and MARK J. STERN
President Reagan and congressional leaders have hailed the new welfare "reform" law as an important moment in the history of social welfare. That's just not true. Although the law does introduce some positive changes, it falls far short of its goals: It will not significantly reduce the number of families on the welfare rolls, nor will it offer much help to the millions of Americans living in poverty. The current welfare reform measures are focused almost exclusively on the public assistance program for poor children and their caretakers - Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC)
NEWS
August 14, 1996
Republicans this week and Democrats soon enough will take credit for "ending welfare as we know it. " But the nation won't know what is ending, much less what is created, unless this so-called new era is monitored adequately from day one. Even while the federal government was making all the rules and defining a national safety net, the successes and failures of previous welfare policy have been widely disputed. Most of the welfare debate has been directed by myth and TV sound-bite anecdote.
NEWS
March 20, 1995 | By Michael Wiseman
Welfare reform is at stage center in America today. And, on that stage, Wisconsin's Republican Gov. Tommy Thompson is a star. As chairman-elect of the National Governor's Association, he is certain to see his initiatives copied or, at least, seriously studied. After all, his state has reduced its caseload in Aid to Families With Dependent Children by 24 percent since 1987. Thompson began state-initiated welfare reform in 1987, long before such efforts became fashionable. Not only have the apparent consequences been dramatic, but Thompson has demonstrated that welfare reform is a winning political issue.
NEWS
December 16, 1993 | By Ken Dilanian, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It was afternoon, and President Clinton had already helicoptered off to a Christmas shopping stint in New York City. But one of his big initiatives was on the table at Monday's entitlements summit: welfare reform. Today co-host Katie Couric was moderating the 2:30 p.m. panel discussion at Bryn Mawr College. Around her was a cast of heavy hitters, among them former New Jersey Gov. Thomas Kean, former Rep. Thomas J. Downey of New York and Patricia Ireland, the president of the National Organization for Women.
NEWS
August 8, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Are you better off now than you were three years ago? If you were on welfare then, your answer may well be "No. " President Clinton announced Tuesday that the number of Americans receiving government aid had fallen dramatically since the enactment of welfare-reform legislation in 1996 and that millions of former recipients had found jobs. In Pennsylvania, welfare rolls dropped 49.26 percent to 312,364 recipients, the government said. In New Jersey, there was a 47.66 percent decline to 175,223 recipients.
NEWS
January 16, 1998 | By Christine James-Brown
One recent morning, I joined the social policy observers, service providers, activists and government and philanthropic leaders who gathered at a Friends meeting house for a United Way-sponsored forum on welfare reform. Later that day, I met at the Union League with the city's powerful to examine that same pressing issue. Both gatherings reinforced my view that our community is lagging in its efforts to move 70,000 Philadelphia parents from welfare to work by the spring of 1999.
NEWS
April 16, 1995 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
President Clinton said yesterday that welfare reform was at the top of his legislative agenda for this year, followed by tax and spending cuts. "They're my 'must list,' " he said in his weekly radio address. Clinton said he wanted to preserve these programs from the legislative scramble sure to occur when Congress reconvenes and Republicans press their own agenda. The Senate is scheduled to return April 24; the House a week later. He said the House welfare-reform bill approved March 24 was too weak on helping people move from welfare to work.
NEWS
November 13, 1994 | By Vanessa Gallman, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
When President Clinton proposed a welfare-reform plan earlier this year that set a two-year limit on benefits for many recipients, some called it punitive. But in congressional campaigns, Democrats and Republicans declared the welfare system almost as big a public menace as crime. They promised fed-up voters they would put recipients to work - or stop them from living off taxpayers. With Republicans now setting the agenda and tone of Congress, welfare reform is likely to move much further right.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 6, 2012 | BY REP. THOMAS P. MURT
IT'S TIME TO CHANGE the Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare, and it starts with something simple - its name. Welfare does not describe what it does or whom it serves. In fact, we are the only state in the country that still has a department called "Public Welfare. " This is why I have introduced a bill that would change the name from the Department of Public Welfare to a name that far better describes what this wing of our state government does: the Department of Human Services.
NEWS
September 18, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro, Tribune Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Congress will meet for only a few final days this week to enable lawmakers to campaign full time in the battle for control of Congress, leaving much business undone until after the election. The House convenes for three days to wrap up its work, while the Senate, where Democrats have the majority, is considering a similar truncated schedule. Lawmakers had initially been scheduled to work through the first week of October. The one must-pass piece of legislation - a bill to keep the government funded once the new fiscal year begins, Oct. 1 - is set for final approval this week in the Senate after having already cleared the House.
NEWS
September 6, 2012 | By Thomas Beaumont, Associated Press
ADEL, Iowa - Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan heaped praise on Bill Clinton Wednesday, holding him up as a model of reform and Barack Obama as his opposite just hours before the former president's speech to the Democratic National Convention. Campaigning in Iowa, Ryan lauded Clinton administration action on welfare reform and spending reductions - areas where the GOP ticket has aimed some of its sharpest critiques of Obama, the incumbent Democrat. Clinton, once an Obama critic, has become one of his biggest assets as the president scraps with GOP nominee Mitt Romney for reelection.
NEWS
August 11, 2012 | By Dick Polman, For The Inquirer
Lying is endemic to politics, but Mitt Romney may have pioneered a new low this week. His TV ad attacking President Obama's welfare policy collides with empirical fact, but that's not the worst of it. Aimed at working-class whites, it also implicitly traffics in toxic racial stereotypes. Romney tried doggedly to campaign on the economy in the belief that the recession would catapult him into the White House. But that strategy clearly isn't working; Obama has proved resilient in swing-state polls, most notably in Ohio.
NEWS
August 10, 2012 | Daily News Editorial
IN 1996, around the time that President Clinton signed the law that ended welfare as we knew it, then-U.S. Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan, D-N.Y., warned it would be a disaster.   "You're talking about children on grates," he said. It didn't happen, of course — not then, in a booming economy, when the welfare rolls plummeted and the law was declared a bipartisan success. And not now, five years into the worst economy since the Great Depression. The fact that we aren't tripping over homeless children begging for food is probably because their mothers are doing everything they can to feed and shelter them.
NEWS
August 9, 2012 | By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Welfare is causing a ruckus in the presidential campaign. But the program is a shadow of its old self from the 1970s, when Ronald Reagan used the image of "welfare queens" to assail government poverty programs promoted by liberals. Nowadays government cash assistance to the poor is mainly conditioned on work. And the Obama administration waivers excoriated by Mitt Romney as gutting welfare reform are unlikely to reverse that basic policy, as even some architects of work requirements acknowledge.
NEWS
April 24, 2012 | Daily News Editorial
In the decade after President Clinton signed the 1996 welfare-reform law, the story line was set: With welfare rolls down by two-thirds, it was a great, bipartisan success. And those who had warned of the dangers of a weakened safety net on the lives and health of poor children had been indulging in apocalyptic fear-mongering. Many low-income single moms did indeed find work in the early years following welfare reform, which also coincided with a roaring economy and an increase in supports like the earned-income-tax Ccedit.
NEWS
March 1, 2012 | By Peter H. Schuck and Ron Haskins
The primary campaign has intensified a justified concern about inequality in America. Even poor Americans consider relatively high inequality acceptable if they have a decent opportunity to improve their condition. But because they may work fewer hours and at stagnant wages, their gains are very limited. Among the poor, surprisingly, never-married mothers have gained the most in recent decades. Their story shows the best way to reduce poverty and inequality: encouraging individuals to work more and supplementing their earnings with tax credits, child-care subsidies, and other benefits.
NEWS
January 11, 2012 | By Marc Lamont Hill, Daily News Columnist
JUST WHEN the Republican primaries couldn't get any more interesting, the candidates upped the ante by approaching the third rail of race. In the most recent wave of debates and stump speeches, two Republican contenders have made extremely controversial comments regarding blacks and poverty. Former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum told a group of supporters that he didn't want to "make black people's lives better giving them other people's money. " Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich was quoted telling a New Hampshire crowd that "the African-American community should demand paychecks and not be satisfied with food stamps.
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