FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 30, 1989 | By Robert DiGiacomo, Special to The Inquirer
When it came time for the teachers and guest speakers at Haddonfield Memorial High School to explain the concept of wellness to students at a seminar on April 19, something could have gotten lost in the translation. Early in the conference, this student definition of wellness was offered: "It's being aware of what's going on," said Mike Eckman, 15, a freshman. OK. "It's knowing what you're doing," he continued. Anything else, Mike? "The picture I'm getting," he said, pausing.
NEWS
November 18, 2002 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The best advertisement for Faatimah Gamble's wellness crusade is staring at you with skin as smooth as velvet and a deeply dimpled smile. At 57 (and proud to say so), Gamble radiates. And though she dresses in the hijab style, wearing the long, unrestricted clothing indicative of her Islamic faith, her posture and carriage make it clear that this grandmother is flab-free and fit. More proof sits nearby in the inner office of a stately brick building among more than 100 that Universal Homes has restored in South Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 28, 1996 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
At Christopher Columbus Elementary School, the sign on the auditorium door reads "orchestra," but it's been years since any student learned to play a single note. The closet labeled "instruments" is empty, except for two record players and a small stack of vinyl LPs; spaces designed as dressing rooms collect dust. The "chorus" room has become a classroom. But inside, a volunteer-run, after-school program is taking hold, according to John Alston, director of the Columbus Boys Choir.
NEWS
December 16, 2007 | By Jan L. Apple FOR THE INQUIRER
As activities go, it may not rank quite as high as Bingo or the ice cream social, but Pitman Manor's Nintendo Wii gaming system is becoming a close second. The continuing care retirement community in downtown Pitman purchased the system in September at EB Games in Glassboro. This Wii package - for under $300 - features such virtual challenges as bowling, baseball, golf and tennis and has become the buzz around this independent and assisted living community, where the average residents' age is well into the 80s. "I really enjoy the activity," said Wilfred "Wil" Parsels Sr., 92, who hasn't missed a weekly session.
FOOD
March 13, 2008 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Six Mount Airy professionals - seeking to serve the nutritional needs of the community - have opened the Black Olive , billed as a health and wellness marketplace. The Black Olive (7122 Germantown Ave., 215-247-5100) was developed for the anonymous benefactors by Carolyn Hines, who practices naturopathic medicine. The shop offers lectures on diet and lifestyle and has a vegan/vegetarian prepared-foods case (apps, mains, desserts), grocery and frozen-food section, and smoothie bar. "I believe in people being educated consumers - not just purchasing off the buzzwords, or if [a product]
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2012
IT WAS A curious scene: a school cafeteria full of girls, some wearing headscarves, learning the art of continental dining. They held their forks in their left hands, using the utensils to transfer sautéed brussels sprouts and orange-glazed chicken to their mouths - being careful to hold the tines down European-style. As they practiced, Faatimah Gamble, wife of legendary songwriter/producer Kenny Gamble, kept watch, handing one girl a lime-green folded cloth napkin and instructing another in the proper use of a knife.
NEWS
November 4, 1991 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Staff Writer
College has always been a perfect example of Newtonian physics: To every academic action there is an equal partying reaction. But in recent years, a lot of that fun, which always involved drinking, has turned to scandal. Area schools have faced serious problems. Temple University had two troubling incidents in September - a reported gang rape, in which the charges were later dismissed, and an alleged acquaintance rape, now awaiting trial. Last year during a drunken pledging party, a Drexel University student fell to his death from a fraternity's fourth-story roof.
NEWS
March 26, 1997 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
How can businesses keep workers healthier and reduce absenteeism? Employers have been calling the Chester County Chamber of Business and Industry with that question, and the chamber plans to provide some answers. "It's an issue coming to the forefront, especially with the new workers'-compensation law," said Holly Stetler, a chamber spokeswoman. The organization will feature Richard Donze, medical director of the occupational health center of Chester County Hospital, at a breakfast program from 7:30 to 9 a.m. April 8 at J&J Catering, 880 Springdale Drive, Exton, to talk about promoting wellness at work.
NEWS
May 28, 2012 | By Alex Branch and Bill Hanna, McClatchy Newspapers
FORT WORTH, Texas - The Fort Worth City Council's consideration of a policy against hiring smokers has stirred strong opinions. Some see a slippery slope toward employment discrimination, while others consider it responsible promotion of workplace wellness. While such a move would be rare for a city, employers everywhere are getting more involved in their employees' lifestyle decisions that affect health, experts say. Companies and some government agencies have crafted policies that range from banning smoking to charging penalties on the health-care benefits of overweight workers.
NEWS
February 11, 1988 | By Andy Hilliard, Special to The Inquirer
To help employees reduce their coffee consumption, Noyes Services provides its workers with free juice. It also pays half the employees' membership fees at a local physical-fitness center. At The Franklin Mint, monthly medical seminars are offered all employees, and they are encouraged to take part in company-sponsored aerobics, Weight Watchers classes, cholesterol and colorectal screening and CPR training. The Henderson Group has joined forces with a local hospital to make available a variety of health services to the tenants of its buildings and to its employees.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 17, 2016
By Katie McGinty Last week, Wells Fargo made history for all the wrong reasons. The bank, one of the largest in Pennsylvania, was hit with the biggest penalty ever - $100 million - issued by the U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), which reported that Wells Fargo had created more than two million unauthorized bank and credit card accounts in its customers' names. It turns out that, for years, Wells Fargo employees have been boosting their sales numbers by signing customers up for bank accounts they didn't want or ask for, according to regulators.
SPORTS
September 12, 2016 | By Phil Anastasia, STAFF WRITER
Tim McAneney is a golf-shirt-and-khakis kind of a football coach, especially on a hot, humid night in early September. Not this night. Not opening night. Not the night when the Lenape High School coach walked on the field for a game for the first time since the death in January of his father, legendary former Pennsauken coach Vince McAneney. "I was thinking to myself, 'How do I honor my father without taking the focus away from the kids?' " McAneney said, looking back at his team's 24-0 victory over Trenton on Friday night.
SPORTS
September 9, 2016 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Columnist
IT IS the season of endorsements, but rarely does anyone get behind an unproven candidate with this level of fervor. It's the sort of endorsement that can make or break the endorser. Frank Reich essentially painted rookie quarterback Carson Wentz as a can't-miss prospect. Wentz, who started just 23 FCS (I-AA) games. Wentz, who got just 39 preseason snaps before he broke his ribs. Wentz, the No. 2 overall pick, who was supposed to carry a clipboard for a season or two so Sam Bradford could show him how it's done.
SPORTS
September 1, 2016 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, STAFF WRITER
On the night of Aug. 31, 1996, the Spectrum, the South Philadelphia arena once so proudly hailed as "America's Showplace," suddenly sagged in insignificance. Across the parking lot, looming like a modern jumbo jet alongside an outdated biplane, its 750,000-square-foot replacement was ready to take off. So much larger was the newer arena that some joked it must have bulked up on steroids, a sports topic on no one's radar when the then state-of-the-art Spectrum opened in 1967. The Spectrum is gone now and, two decades and three name changes later, the Wells Fargo Center, the oldest and most active of the three sports structures that make up the South Philadelphia complex, is marking its 20th anniversary on Wednesday.
NEWS
August 29, 2016 | By Scott Sturgis, Staff Writer
2016 Nissan Sentra 1.8 SR CVT Vs. 2016 Chevrolet Cruze Premier: Small sedan shootout. This week: Nissan Sentra. Price: $25,245 as tested. (The SR started at $20,410 and added $1,230 for the technology package and $2,590 for Premium Package. A base S with six-speed manual starts at a tantalizingly low $16,780.) Marketer's pitch: "Your upgrade awaits. " Conventional wisdom: "Oh? You're upgrading me from this Sentra to what kind of car?" Reality: I'd hate to see a downgrade.
NEWS
August 23, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel and Laura McCrystal, STAFF WRITERS
The Air Force said last week that it would stop using the potentially dangerous firefighting foam that over years contaminated some local water supplies, but no other military branch has a public plan to ban the foam at its bases. Since 2014, 16 wells have been closed in Bucks and Montgomery Counties after they were found to be tainted with PFOA and PFOS, chemicals linked to cancer that leached into local water supplies from firefighting foam used at two now-closed naval air bases.
NEWS
August 22, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
In 2002, Dr. Murray Schwartz worked very briefly as a radiologist at Valley Hospital in Palmer, Alaska. He was there only from July 1 to 19 and from Sept. 16 to 21, with an August stint at a hospital in Anchorage. But Palmer convinced him that he had made the right decision to work in Alaska, even for only weeks. "He stayed at a little hotel in Palmer," a son, Jason, said. "And he would walk out the front door of the hotel and there were the mountains. He loved it there. " On Thursday, Aug. 18, Dr. Schwartz, 72, of Cherry Hill, a radiologist who from 2000 to 2008 worked brief terms at several hospitals in Kentucky, New Jersey, North Dakota, Ohio, and Pennsylvania, died of complications from pneumonia at Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center in Camden.
TRAVEL
August 15, 2016
Name: Room Mate Hotels, room-matehotels.com What it does: A hotel group launched by three friends who were looking for hotels they actually wanted to stay in. It began in Madrid and has expanded to 23 hotels in 12 cities in Europe, the United States, Mexico, and Turkey. More hotels are planned in 2017 for Rotterdam, Netherlands, and Barcelona, Spain, among other destinations. What's hot: Each property in the hotel group has its own name and distinctive decor. That personal approach extends to hotel guests, whom the staff is encouraged to treat as friends, buddies, or roommates.
NEWS
August 14, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Highland Township, a tiny Elk County town that in 2013 approved an ordinance banning natural-gas wastewater injection wells, overturned the ordinance this week and promptly settled a federal lawsuit with a Marcellus Shale gas producer that wants to build a disposal well in the community. Two new supervisors on the township's three-member governing board voted Wednesday to rescind the ordinance, saying they were unlikely to prevail in a lawsuit with gas producer Seneca Resources Corp.
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