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SPORTS
April 2, 2011
JAYSON WERTH was an excellent player in these parts over the past few years. Not only that, as English poet, songwriter and dramatist Thomas Haynes Bayly so shrewdly observed, absence makes the heart grow fonder. Thomas Haynes Bayly would have been a Phillies fan. As everyone knows, Werth doesn't live here anymore. He was lured into a Washington Nationals uniform by the guarantee of $126 million over the next 7 years and, honestly, who among us wouldn't have done the same?
SPORTS
April 1, 2011 | Daily News Wire Services
It wasn't the kind of debut Jayson Werth expected. His Washington Nationals opened their season by getting shut out by 37-year-old Derek Lowe and the Atlanta Braves, 2-0, with soon-to-be-39-year-old Chipper Jones scoring the deciding run in front of a non-sellout Nationals Park crowd. Werth, batting second, singled in his first at-bat, struck out in the third inning, and grounded out to shortstop in the sixth and eighth innings to finish 1-for-4. The spotlight yesterday was expected to be on the former Phillie, who signed a 7-year, $126 million contract to play in Washington.
SPORTS
April 1, 2011 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - As far as Washington debuts go for tall, bearded guys from Springfield, Ill., Jayson Werth's initial game as a National probably didn't compare with Lincoln's first inaugural address. Still, on an opening day that was gray and - even by Werth's strutting, sunglassed standards - extremely cool, he was nearly as ubiquitous in the nation's capital as Lincoln himself. Honest, Abe. His image - Lincolnesque again after an unsuccessful flirtation with clean-shavedness - graced an enormous billboard in left field, which from some angles in the riverside ballpark appeared to be supporting the cloud-enveloped Capitol dome.
SPORTS
March 7, 2011 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Columnist
The Mets are ruining one of our favorite hobbies. It's still fun to loathe them, but they've become such a miserable mess in every way that some of the schadenfreude is muted. Pity always gets in the way of a good time. Luckily, Jayson Werth and the Nationals are offering an alternative on the contempt front. The former Phil is begging you to hate him, and it's starting to seem like a pretty good option. About a week ago, Werth said he hates the Phillies. Maybe that means he hates you, too. You're probably wondering how you'd tell the difference.
SPORTS
February 23, 2011
VIERA, Fla. - Four months removed from his last Phillies at-bat, 150 miles from the pristine white sand beaches and tantalizing restaurants that make Clearwater such a pleasant spring-training encampment, Jayson Werth spent the first day of the rest of his baseball life in a Washington Nationals uniform at the Space Coast Stadium complex. And it didn't take long for him to be reminded how much has changed, and not just because the 7-year, $126 million contract he signed means he pretty much never has to ask how much things costs.
NEWS
December 24, 2010
DURING HIS four-year stay with the Phillies, Jayson Werth averaged 29 home runs and 84 RBI per season. Now he's been rewarded with a $126 million contract with the Washington Nationals. Johnny Callison must be spinning in his grave. I would humbly suggest that before leaving Philadelphia he should write a nice check to any one of the dozens of worthwhile charities that do such outstanding work in our city. Tom O'Neill, Philadelphia
SPORTS
December 16, 2010 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Staff Writer
No one will question the quality of the Phillies' starting rotation now that Cliff Lee is on board. The offense, with the departure of Jayson Werth , is a different matter. That's fine with Charlie Manuel , even though he's a manager in love with the offensive side of the game. "I talked to [pitching coach] Rich Dubee [Tuesday] night," Manuel said after Wednesday's news conference to officially announce the signing of Lee. "He was so excited. He said we can hit Lee fifth behind [Ryan]
SPORTS
December 16, 2010
WASHINGTON - "They got their boy back, I guess," Jayson Werth said a little after 1 p.m. yesterday, finally exhibiting the bitterness that Cliff Lee would reference in a similar press conference a few hours later, as he accepted the kind of contract the Phillies were unwilling to offer their departed rightfielder. "When he found out I was coming here, he wasn't the happiest person in the world," Lee said a few hours after the Nationals introduced Werth in a sponsored and orchestrated affair that took the "press" out of press conference.
SPORTS
December 7, 2010 | By Bob Brookover and Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writers
LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. - Pat Gillick learned he was going into the Hall of Fame on Monday, one day after Jayson Werth signed a seven-year, $126 million contract with the Washington Nationals. Without Gillick's decision to bring Werth to Philadelphia after he was cut loose by the Los Angeles Dodgers, the rightfielder may never achieved such fame and fortune after four productive years in Philadelphia. "I'm happy for him," Gillick said. "That's a lot of money. You can buy a lot of real estate in Springfield, Ill., with $126 million.
NEWS
December 7, 2010
WE NOW know what it costs to go from first to worst: $126 million. That's how much it took to lure rightfielder Jayson Werth from his coveted spot with the first-place Phillies to the last-place Washington Nationals. We mostly wish Werth well. He'll always have a place in our hearts thanks to his starring role on the team that won the World Series in 2008. During that magic year, he had a .273 average with 24 home runs, including a two-run homer in the fourth game of the series that showcased the Phils' dominance.
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