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West Bank

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NEWS
March 6, 2013 | By Josef Federman, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - Israel's decision to launch a pair of "Palestinian-only" bus lines in the West Bank on Monday - presented by the government as a goodwill gesture, assailed by critics as racism, and welcomed by Palestinian riders - is shining a light on the messy situation created by 45 years of military occupation and Jewish settlements in the area. While full and formal peace remains distant, the Jewish and Palestinian populations of the West Bank are so intertwined that daily routines are often shaped in mind-boggling ways.
NEWS
April 14, 2013 | By Mohammed Daraghmeh, Associated Press
RAMALLAH, West Bank - Palestinian Prime Minister Salaam Fayyad resigned on Saturday, leaving the Palestinians without one of their most moderate and well-respected voices just as the United States is launching a new push for Mideast peace. A statement from the official Palestinian news agency Wafa said President Mahmoud Abbas met with Fayyad late in the day and accepted his resignation, thanking him for his service. According to the statement, Abbas asked Fayyad to stay in his post until Abbas forms a new government.
NEWS
December 4, 2012 | By Dalia Nammari and Aron Heller, Associated Press
RAMALLAH, West Bank - Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas returned triumphantly to the West Bank on Sunday, receiving a boisterous welcome from thousands of cheering supporters at a rally celebrating his people's acceptance to the United Nations. An Israeli decision to cut off a cash transfer to the financially troubled Palestinian Authority, following an earlier decision to build thousands of new homes in Jewish settlements, failed to put a damper on the celebrations. But Palestinian officials acknowledged they were undecided on what to do with their newfound status, and were waiting for Israeli elections and new ideas from President Obama before deciding how to proceed.
NEWS
May 31, 2013 | By Josef Federman, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - The Palestinian Authority president has told advisers that as the United States tries to restart Mideast peace talks, he is under intense international pressure to return to negotiations with Israel and drop demands for a Jewish settlement freeze in the West Bank, officials said Wednesday. In a closed meeting, Mahmoud Abbas lamented his difficult choice: Rebuff the Americans and alienate Washington, or cave in and face an uproar at home. Aides say Abbas expects a formal proposal to renew talks from U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry in coming weeks.
NEWS
January 14, 2013 | By Joel Greenberg, Washington Post
JERUSALEM - Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu promised Sunday to follow through with plans for settlement construction in a key West Bank area known as E-1 after police evicted scores of Palestinian protesters who had set up a tent camp there. "We will complete the planning, and there will be construction," Netanyahu told Army Radio hours after the eviction, but he cautioned that planning for the new development "will take time. " Netanyahu, who is in the home stretch of an election campaign, moved swiftly against the Palestinian encampment, a new form of grass-roots protest modeled after scores of wildcat outposts set up by Jewish settlers on West Bank hills without government approval.
NEWS
March 18, 1991 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was just before 11 on a mild and sunny morning, not much more than two weeks since the end of war in the Persian Gulf, and life in this Israeli- occupied Palestinian city had the look and feel of prewar normality. The sidewalks were full of people, smiling and chatty. The shops were full of customers, buying blue jeans and sneakers, bread and sweets. The streets were full of Israeli soldiers, patrolling Ramallah in jeeps and armored vehicles, all covered with heavy wire mesh to protect against stones thrown by roving young men in black vinyl jackets.
NEWS
March 12, 1998 | Daily News wire services
The funerals of three Palestinian workers shot and killed by Israeli soldiers brought cries for vengeance yesterday from fellow Palestinians - and grim promises from Israel that force will be met with force. "Blood leads to blood!" white-scarved Palestinian schoolgirls screamed as they marched through the winding streets of Dura, the hometown of three laborers slain Tuesday night at an Israeli roadblock on their way home from jobs in Israel. The deaths set off the West Bank's worst day of violence in months, leaving 32 Palestinians and an Israeli border policeman hurt in clashes yesterday.
NEWS
November 1, 1989 | By Marc Duvoisin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The tax man came calling on Jabra Salsaa yesterday. When he left, he took with him a television, a typewriter and the electric organ on which Salsaa has practiced his favorite arrangements of Bach and Haydn for the last 20 years. Like hundreds of other residents of this picturesque Palestinian town, Salsaa, 53, the organist in the local Roman Catholic Church, has refused to pay taxes to the Israeli military government for two years running. And like the other tax rebels, he has paid dearly for his defiance.
NEWS
April 20, 1986
The attack against Libya excites praise and condemnation. But the United States would better serve the cause of peace by paying full attention to the matter of the West Bank of the Jordan River, home of Palestinians and at present very much a part of modern Israel. Unrest over the West Bank and Gaza is the basic underlying cause of antagonism between Islamic countries, Israel and the West, which erupts as terrorism. The Arab world may recognize Israel's right to exist if the West Bank can be restored to neutrality or independence with Palestinian residents returned to their homes.
NEWS
March 2, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The Palestinian mayor of the West Bank city of Nablus was shot early today by an unidentified gunman, Israel Army Radio reported. The radio said the mayor, Zafer Masri, was killed in the attack. Military sources who spoke on condition they not be identified said Masri was seriously wounded in the shooting, which they said occurred as he drove in his car through Nablus. A police spokesman said he could not immediately confirm the report because "it was a security matter.
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NEWS
January 28, 2016
WEST BANK Palestinian teen stabs Israeli man A Palestinian teenager stabbed and seriously wounded an Israeli man in the West Bank on Wednesday, police said, the latest in a relentless wave of attacks by Palestinians on Israelis. Police spokeswoman Luba Samri said the attack took place near a gas station in the West Bank settlement of Givat Zeev. She said a 50-year-old man was stabbed and that he was evacuated to a hospital. She said civilians at the scene chased the attacker, a 17-year-old Palestinian whose identity was not immediately known, and held him until police arrived.
NEWS
November 9, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Israelis have been debating whether the assassination of Yitzhak Rabin, 20 years ago this month, has irrevocably altered the course of Israeli (and Mideast) history. My answer is yes. To understand the profound consequences of Rabin's murder, one need only contrast this military hero and his era with the life and times of Benjamin "Bibi" Netanyahu, who has held the prime ministership for nearly 10 of the 20 years since Rabin's murder, and will visit the White House this week. "1995 was a reset moment in Israel's history, a shift from secular pragmatists to ideologues," says Dan Ephron, author of Killing a King: the Assassination of Rabin and the Remaking of Israel . That gap was on full display in Israel in recent days.
NEWS
October 9, 2015
ISSUE | WEST BANK Beware of Abbas Trudy Rubin's analysis of problems on the West Bank is shortsighted ("Danger signs on West Bank," Sunday). She warns that Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas' closing of the Oslo process will lead to increased tensions on the West Bank. She blames Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu for being too focused on Iran at the expense of peace in his own backyard. Rubin paints a narrow picture of a complicated problem. She implies that an attack on Israel by the ayatollahs is too unlikely to worry about.
NEWS
October 5, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
On a bright, sunny day in September of 1993, I stood on the White House lawn watching Yitzhak Rabin and Yasir Arafat sign the Oslo peace accords in front of President Bill Clinton. At that moment, it was possible to suspend disbelief and imagine a two-state solution, with Israel and Palestine living side by side. Twenty years on, Rabin and Arafat are dead, and so is the Oslo peace process - although politicians from Israel and the West are loath to admit this. Last week at the United Nations, however, Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas said his government could no longer be bound by the Oslo pact, emphasizing Israeli settlement-building on the West Bank among his many grievances.
SPORTS
August 14, 2015 | DAILY NEWS STAFF
COACHING GAMES, practice, recruiting, scouting, fundraising for the university - a college basketball coach's life is a full one. Yet Villanova's Jay Wright - along with his family, and Sixers coach Brett Brown - recently found time to make a difference in Israel. According to a story from the Catholic News Service, Brown and Wright - along with Wright's wife, Patty, and two of their children, Taylor, 22, and Reilly, 17 - participated in a series of basketball clinics under the auspices of PeacePlayers International, an organization that uses basketball to promote understanding.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Israelis are attributing Benjamin "Bibi" Netanyahu's surprise election triumph to the fact that he ran a " gevalt " campaign. The Yiddish word gevalt is the equivalent of "Help!" - a cry for rescue at a critical time. And facing a possible defeat as voting day neared, Netanyahu wooed disaffected voters back to his right-wing Likud party by fear-mongering to the max. He raised the specter of an Arab horde (Israel's Arab citizens) who were "voting in droves. " He warned that his main opposition, the Zionist Alliance, would create a terrorist state in Jerusalem and "do the bidding" of the international community on settlements or peace talks.
NEWS
March 19, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
March brings Philadelphia those occasional gloriously sunny days that let winter survivors know it's safe to leave their bunkers because spring is coming. It's a good time to learn that a long-dreamed-of park atop the dormant Reading Railroad viaduct may be on track for construction this summer. A newly announced strategic investment by the William Penn and Knight Foundations, complementing public and other funding, will help make the park happen. Four other parks will also benefit from the $11 million the foundations plan to spend.
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