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West Coast Offense

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November 28, 1999 | By Phil Sheridan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Before anyone starts shoveling dirt on the West Coast offense, it seems fair to check to see whether it still has a pulse. It's easy to assume that Bill Walsh's brainchild has seen its best days. A quick look around the NFL reveals 1999 to be, at the very least, a down year for teams running variations of the offense Walsh perfected in San Francisco. Or is it merely a good year for offenses that are too busy making big plays to bother with Walsh's precision, short-passing game?
SPORTS
November 10, 1998 | By Phil Sheridan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There's nothing new about the Eagles dropping their expectations and going with a remedial version of their original offense. So why did the Detroit Lions act so surprised? It happened in each of Jon Gruden's three seasons as the team's offensive coordinator. In 1995, when Ray Rhodes and Gruden first tried to bring a West Coast-style offense to Philadelphia, the team got off to a 1-3 start and reverted to what Gruden fatalistically dubbed the "Jersey Shore" offense. By handing the ball to Ricky Watters and Charlie Garner 30 times a game, the Eagles were able to go 9-3 the rest of that season and make the playoffs.
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September 19, 2004 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There it was, a cultural change in progress. Early on, the Nebraska Cornhuskers had the ball, first and goal, at Pittsburgh's 4-yard line. The call came into the huddle. Pass. Second and goal. Pass. Third and goal. Pass. "You're Nebraska. Run the ball," said a Nebraska sportswriter up in the press box at Heinz Field yesterday after the Huskers quarterback was sacked, two passes were dropped, and Nebraska had to kick a field goal. He was joking. Sort of. Maybe. Adjustments are being made.
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January 27, 1998 | By Phil Sheridan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dana Bible, who is expected to replace Jon Gruden as Eagles offensive coordinator, has worked alongside some of the top practitioners of the so-called West Coast-style offense. An Eagles official confirmed yesterday that Bible will get the job. Bible, 44, spent the last three seasons as offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach at Stanford University. He has been in coaching on the collegiate and pro levels since 1976, but this job would be by far his most visible and demanding.
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September 10, 1995 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This description of a physically gifted quarterback struggling to grasp the West Coast offense ought to sound familiar to Eagles fans: "Even with his tremendous athletic ability, he really had a tough time with that system. He wasn't throwing to receivers who were open. He was forcing passes. He was taking off and running with the ball when guys were wide open. " Yet Guy Benjamin, the former 49ers quarterback who knows Bill Walsh and the offensive system he conceived as well as anyone, was not discussing Randall Cunningham's performance so far in this new and complicated Eagles attack.
SPORTS
April 11, 2000 | By Phil Sheridan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Speed, while certainly a good thing, is not the only thing. At least not for wide receivers in the West Coast-style offense the Eagles run. "That's not an absolute must," coach Andy Reid said last week. "We don't have to have a blazer. " It is widely assumed the Eagles will take at least one receiver high in this weekend's NFL draft. While fans clamor for a track star, the coaches are more interested in overall football ability. "If we decide to draft a receiver, I want a good receiver," Reid said.
SPORTS
August 15, 2000 | By Phil Sheridan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There is a chicken-or-egg element in the relationship between the West Coast offense and the great tight ends who have played in it. Does it take a great tight end to make the offense work, or does the offense make tight ends look great? If the former is the answer, the Eagles are probably another draft away from getting their offense where they need it to be. If it's the latter, if a well-run offense will create opportunities for the tight ends, the Eagles can get by with the guys on the roster.
SPORTS
January 28, 1998 | By Gary Miles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Eagles' new offensive coordinator, Dana Bible, said yesterday that next season's offense won't be much different from the one Jon Gruden ran for three seasons. The Birds introduced Bible yesterday, and the former offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach at Stanford University said straight off that he planned few radical changes to the West Coast offense that Gruden developed. "Naturally, it will take on the personality of myself and the offensive coaches," Bible said in a conference call from his office at Stanford.
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December 13, 1995 | by Paul Domowitch, Daily News Sports Writer
If Bill Walsh happened to catch on TV the Eagles' 20-17 victory over the Dallas Cowboys Sunday, he probably wondered at least two things. The first thing he probably wondered was how in the world Barry Switzer ever got a license to coach in the National Football League. The second thing he probably wondered was what exactly the Eagles have done to his offense. Walsh, as you probably are aware, is the inventor of the high-tech West Coast offense, or at least the guy who perfected it. The Eagles claim to use the West Coast offense.
SPORTS
August 30, 2008 | Les Bowen on Daily News' Eagletarian blog www.philly.com/philly/blogs/dneagles
There were no surprises among the eight roster cuts the Eagles announced yesterday, which brings them from 75 to 67 players. They must get to the regular-season limit of 53 by 6 p.m. today. Released were: wide receivers Bam Childress and Jamal Jones, cornerbacks Therrian Fontenot and Nick Graham, running back Ryan Moats (waived/injured), safety Marcus Paschal, offensive lineman Stefan Rodgers and linebacker Pago Tagofau. Once Moats gets over the high ankle sprain he suffered at the end of the Patriots' preseason game, it will be interesting to see if someone takes a shot with the 2005 third-round pick.
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December 17, 2014 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
ANDY REID won 11 games and lost five in his second season as a professional head football coach. If all goes as expected - and that's been a mighty dangerous word around here these last few weeks - Chip Kelly will finish with an identical record in his second full season as a professional head football coach. There are other similarities, as well. Both men were risky choices. Both men were risk-taking, offensive-minded men: Reid a third-generation apostle of Bill Walsh's West Coast offense; Kelly a college trailblazer with his breakneck offensive pace, dictating your personnel as well as his. Reid won a playoff game that second season, and at the time seemed to have charted a steady track toward a Super Bowl championship.
SPORTS
November 14, 2014 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
Jeff Garcia answered his phone one day late in the winter of 2013, and on the line was a man he didn't know at all, seeking advice and insight about a man Garcia knew as well as anyone. Mark Sanchez had just completed a season with the New York Jets that had left his confidence, and maybe his career as a starting NFL quarterback, in broken pieces. The Jets had gone 6-10. Sanchez had thrown 18 interceptions and lost eight fumbles. He'd been benched twice. He'd butt-fumbled. Now the Jets had hired a new offensive coordinator, their third in three years - Marty Mornhinweg - and Sanchez wanted to probe the mind of one of Mornhinweg's best pupils to learn the West Coast offense.
SPORTS
October 10, 2014 | By Les Bowen, Daily News Staff Writer
WHAT YOU SAW the Eagles' defense doing in the second half last Sunday against the Rams? That's pretty much the opposite of what you should see this week against the Giants. We're not really talking here about the nearly-blowing-a-27-point-lead part. A 27-point lead is unlikely against a Giants team that has won three in a row, all by double digits. And we can't really guarantee that the surrendering-a-bunch-of-yards-and-points part won't happen again, either. In the Eagles, we have the NFL's 28th-ranked defense, 24th against the rush, 29th against the pass, a group that has given up big plays with alarming frequency.
SPORTS
September 6, 2014 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
Josh Huff expected something different. The rookie receiver the Eagles selected in the third round of this year's draft figured he would arrive in Philadelphia and quickly assimilate Chip Kelly's offensive system. He had good reason to believe it, too. Huff had played for Kelly at the University of Oregon. He was Kelly's leading receiver as a junior in 2012 and ran the same system in 2013 under coach Mark Helfrich when he was again the Ducks' top pass catcher. All Huff had to do was show up at the NovaCare Complex and start running those plays that made him a star at Oregon.
SPORTS
February 13, 2013 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eagles head coach Chip Kelly, known to quip more than his predecessor, Andy Reid, wasn't exactly forthright. But he was amusing when talking about how the team's play-calling duties will work between him and new offensive coordinator Pat Shurmur. "I will call all the good plays, and Pat will call the bad ones," Kelly said on Monday during a news conference to introduce the new coaching staff. Shurmur was more revealing. "Things haven't been totally talked about [between us]
SPORTS
February 1, 2013 | By Jeff McLane, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW ORLEANS - Colin Kaepernick, like his Super Bowl-playing predecessors at quarterback, represents the future of the NFL. Like Joe Montana and the West Coast offense and Steve Young and his mobility, Kaepernick is a victory away from becoming the first quarterback to win in a way many thought once impossible. Kaepernick is a running quarterback. But he's also a passing quarterback. Young was both, but he was more of a scrambler than a runner. Kaepernick, on the other hand, can both run and pass within the 49ers offense and with equal skill.
SPORTS
January 21, 2013 | By Jeff McLane, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Eagles have hired former Cleveland Browns coach Pat Shurmur, an NFL source said Sunday. Shurmur is expected to be named offensive coordinator, but an exact title had yet to be determined. New Eagles coach Chip Kelly likely will handle the offensive play-calling next season. He became one of the NFL's highest-paid coaches by signing a five-year contract worth $32.5 million with the Birds last week, ESPN reported. But he said that he was looking for a coordinator to help in the passing game.
SPORTS
September 13, 2011
MY DAILY NEWS colleague Rich Hofmann is much better at this than I am. Over the last decade, he has made a point of debunking the popular notion that Eagles coach Andy Reid and offensive coordinator Marty Mornhinweg are pass-happy maniacs with no regard for the running game. Hofmann concedes that the Eagles throw a lot, but he has always said that when judging the Birds' perceived lack of commitment to run, you have to understand the overall philosophy of the offense.
SPORTS
August 29, 2011 | BY TED SILARY, silary@phillynews.com
AS LONG AGO as the last century, it turns out, there was a hint Ryan Nassib had a fascination with Orange. Now, the 6-2, 230-pound redshirt junior from Malvern Prep is eagerly preparing for his second season as Syracuse University's starting quarterback. But in 1998, even before he began playing football, his name could be found in a newspaper and he was asking quite the question. How do they make Cheetos? Nassib was then a student at a grade school, Ss. Simon & Jude, in the town where he still resides, West Chester, and, as part of a class project, he fired off questions to the Inquirer for a column called "Kids' Talk.
SPORTS
August 25, 2011 | BY LES BOWEN, bowenl@phillynews.com
E SPN THE MAGAZINE is relaunching with a Sept. 5 edition it bills as being completely about Michael Vick. Some of the subjects assayed seem pretty familiar to a Philadelphia audience, which has pondered the Vick ponderables for 2 years now. One piece is about how there is no middle ground, you either think Vick is a terrible person or you think he was given too harsh a sentence. (I think there is room for middle ground there, but that probably wouldn't make a compelling story.)
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