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West Indies

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1992 | By Terence Samuel, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
CAMBRIDGE Fiction. By Caryl Phillips. Alfred A. Knopf. $19. British writer Caryl Phillips' latest novel is a remarkable examination of the 19th-century West Indian slave trade, notable for its enormous imaginative force, the convincing consistency of its unusual language and its powerful evocation of time and place. But the crowning achievement of this haunting novel has to be its overwhelming courage, its willingness to stare evil right in the eye and not flinch or lose control.
NEWS
October 31, 1987 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The poems of Derek Walcott are so lush they could kill. Sometimes they seem like jungles that swallow up the unwary, or like delicate white lilies spreading poison from every vein. These are truly poems of Walcott's native West Indies - full of cross- cutting rhythms, dazzling color, puzzling and seductive sound, fierce languor. They reflect life lived at the brink - on the edge of the sea, on the edge of America, at the far end of Africa and Europe, and at the jittery border where intellect and feeling meet.
NEWS
December 29, 1991 | By Judi Dash, Special to The Inquirer
I am lounging on my terra-cotta terrace, looking out upon the forested twin peaks of the half-mile-high Pitons. Purple and red streaks coat the sky as an orange sun melts slowly into the Caribbean; the only sounds are palm fronds clacking softly in the breeze, the muffled roar of the sea, and the high- pitched chirp of millions of crickets greeting the night. Another lazy day bites the dusk in St. Lucia. Lush and laid-back, this mountainous dot in the West Indies, between St. Vincent and Martinique, is a perfect retreat for those who are game for some genteel roughing it. This is not the place to come for gourmet dining, wild nightlife or hop-to service.
NEWS
March 18, 2012
1. f. Russia. 2. h. Sweden. 3. d. Italy. 4. i. Wales. 5. c. India. 6. j. West Indies. 7. g. Spain. 8. b. France. 9. e. Mexico. 10. a. Czech Republic.
FOOD
August 16, 2013 | By Rick Nichols, For The Inquirer
A trademark earnestness and delight in quirky discovery suffused the cluttered, third-floor loft above Old City's vintage Franklin Fountain one morning last week. The curious Berley Brothers (Eric and Ryan), dressed in their customary period attire, heavily dependent on knickers and bow ties, were showing off their newfound collection of sugar (and, thus, also candy) memorabilia. Out of cardboard sleeves, they slipped black-and-white photos of cane-cutting in Hawaii, of half-naked workers in the West Indies stoking fires as ferocious as a steam engine's, of industrial giants on the Delaware riverfront where the world's largest sugar-maker in the day (Franklin Sugar Refining)
NEWS
June 6, 1993 | By Paul J. Lim, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
He never served on Her Majesty's Secret Service. He never transported sensitive government files or saved the free world from destruction. But his name was Bond. James Bond. And for most of his life, the Philadelphia ornithologist who grew up in Gwynedd would be compared - for better or worse - to Agent 007, the character novelist Ian Fleming named after him. The man who will forever be known as the real-life James Bond is the subject of a new book, to be released this week, by David R. Contosta of Plymouth.
NEWS
March 18, 2012
While reflecting on this weekend's festivities in honor of St. Patrick, patron saint of Ireland, see if you can match up other nations and their patron saints. (In some cases, the saint listed is just one of a country's patron saints.) 1. St. Basil the Great. 2. St. Bridget. 3. St. Catherine of Siena. 4. St. David. 5. St. Francis Xavier. 6. St. Gertrude. 7. St. James the Greater. 8. St. Joan of Arc. 9. Our Lady of Guadalupe. 10. St. Wenceslas.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
From the director of Slam comes Brooklyn Babylon, a dreamy, nightmarish, sexy, poetic riff on the theme of Solomon and Sheba. Here the lovers are called Sol and Sara, a soulful hip-hop artist from the West Indies (Tariq Trotter of the Roots) and an ethereal Jewish beauty (Karen Goberman) who live in neighboring enclaves in Brooklyn. Though the ethnic groups are in proximity, both are insular and have nothing but suspicion and contempt for outsiders. As in Mississippi Masala, a car collision introduces the protagonists, who slowly learn that their two cultures have not only biblical ancestors in common, but rhythms and passions of the musical and romantic varieties.
NEWS
January 23, 2000 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Until five years ago, the walled garden at Gwynedd-Mercy College in Gwynedd Valley was overgrown and neglected. Today, it is starting to blossom into the beauty it enjoyed in the early 1900s as part of a large estate. The thanks go to Gwynedd-Mercy College archivist Eleanor King of Philadelphia, who contacted the Swedesford Garden Club and Master Gardeners of Montgomery County about getting the garden back in shape. "In 1995, the Swedesford Garden Club did a spring cleanup for Earth Day," King said.
NEWS
August 13, 1993 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
The widow of "the real James Bond" gazes fondly at a photo of President Clinton and declares, "What I admire about this kid is that he's so sure of himself. "Boy, I want to get ahold of that Senator Dole," adds 95-year-old Mary Wickham Bond. "His name really fits him, doesn't it? He's a very doleful fellow. " Of course, the president seems like a "kid" if you were born in 1898. And being a lifelong booster for the Democratic Party, Bond has little love for Senate minority leader Robert Dole.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
August 16, 2013 | By Rick Nichols, For The Inquirer
A trademark earnestness and delight in quirky discovery suffused the cluttered, third-floor loft above Old City's vintage Franklin Fountain one morning last week. The curious Berley Brothers (Eric and Ryan), dressed in their customary period attire, heavily dependent on knickers and bow ties, were showing off their newfound collection of sugar (and, thus, also candy) memorabilia. Out of cardboard sleeves, they slipped black-and-white photos of cane-cutting in Hawaii, of half-naked workers in the West Indies stoking fires as ferocious as a steam engine's, of industrial giants on the Delaware riverfront where the world's largest sugar-maker in the day (Franklin Sugar Refining)
SPORTS
April 28, 2013 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Penn State is more than a three-hour ride from Franklin Field, but the Nittany Lions like to think of the Penn Relays as a home game for their track team, especially those runners who have been competing at the carnival since high school. The Lions certainly felt right at home Friday. They received a gutty 1,600-meter anchor leg from sophomore Robby Creese and picked up a hard-earned victory over Villanova and Oregon in the men's distance medley relay, their first win in the event since 1959.
NEWS
April 15, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
When the phone rang one afternoon last week, a familiar voice was on the line. It belonged to the prancing front man of the band that throughout its illustrious and sometimes sinister history defined what rock-and-roll is better than any other in the music's history. "Is this Dan?," he asked, then introduced himself. "Hi, Dan, it's Mick," he said, pausing for a half-beat and adding, "Jagger. " He was phoning from somewhere in the West Indies: "I'm away from everything, doing pre-prep for the tour rehearsals.
NEWS
March 18, 2012
1. f. Russia. 2. h. Sweden. 3. d. Italy. 4. i. Wales. 5. c. India. 6. j. West Indies. 7. g. Spain. 8. b. France. 9. e. Mexico. 10. a. Czech Republic.
NEWS
March 18, 2012
While reflecting on this weekend's festivities in honor of St. Patrick, patron saint of Ireland, see if you can match up other nations and their patron saints. (In some cases, the saint listed is just one of a country's patron saints.) 1. St. Basil the Great. 2. St. Bridget. 3. St. Catherine of Siena. 4. St. David. 5. St. Francis Xavier. 6. St. Gertrude. 7. St. James the Greater. 8. St. Joan of Arc. 9. Our Lady of Guadalupe. 10. St. Wenceslas.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2008 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Look at the list of marquee musicians with songs released exclusively on Appleseed Recordings over the last decade, and you might think there was a major label hiding out in West Chester. Bruce Springsteen, Jon Bon Jovi, Wyclef Jean, Bonnie Raitt, Steve Earle, Ani DiFranco, Jackson Browne, Pete Seeger, Lou Reed, and Donovan have all recorded for the label, which was founded by political activist-turned-music exec Jim Musselman in 1997. The label has two artists up for Grammys tonight, guitarist David Bromberg and African American a capella group Sweet Honey in the Rock.
NEWS
October 28, 2001 | By Suzanne Gordon FOR THE INQUIRER
Not too long ago, on a trip in the islands, my grown daughter and I found ourselves stuck in St. Barts. Well, "stuck" is really a poor choice of words, especially nowadays, when many Americans would be uncomfortable feeling stuck outside the country. But it accurately describes our dilemma. If one had to be stuck anywhere, I'd probably choose St. Barts, except for the fact that it's one of the Caribbean's most expensive places to visit. So we had to use our imagination and the few bucks left in our pocketbooks to make the most of it. And we did. We settled in at Le Presqu'ile on the waterfront in the only town, Gustavia.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
From the director of Slam comes Brooklyn Babylon, a dreamy, nightmarish, sexy, poetic riff on the theme of Solomon and Sheba. Here the lovers are called Sol and Sara, a soulful hip-hop artist from the West Indies (Tariq Trotter of the Roots) and an ethereal Jewish beauty (Karen Goberman) who live in neighboring enclaves in Brooklyn. Though the ethnic groups are in proximity, both are insular and have nothing but suspicion and contempt for outsiders. As in Mississippi Masala, a car collision introduces the protagonists, who slowly learn that their two cultures have not only biblical ancestors in common, but rhythms and passions of the musical and romantic varieties.
NEWS
August 20, 2000 | By Dick Cooper, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
I have been through tornadoes and blizzards and floods, but nothing quite compares with being the survivor of a hurricane. Unlike other natural disasters that strike quickly and move on, hurricanes give you a lot of warning. Thanks to the Weather Channel, CNN and the Internet, hurricanes become media events even if they never touch land or overturn a boat. You can follow a hurricane's progress in color on maps that show the storm's track and intensity. Newscasters in windbreakers and ball caps rush to windswept beaches and shout into their foam-covered microphones as palm fronds fly by in the rain.
NEWS
January 23, 2000 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Until five years ago, the walled garden at Gwynedd-Mercy College in Gwynedd Valley was overgrown and neglected. Today, it is starting to blossom into the beauty it enjoyed in the early 1900s as part of a large estate. The thanks go to Gwynedd-Mercy College archivist Eleanor King of Philadelphia, who contacted the Swedesford Garden Club and Master Gardeners of Montgomery County about getting the garden back in shape. "In 1995, the Swedesford Garden Club did a spring cleanup for Earth Day," King said.
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