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BUSINESS
February 15, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Norfolk Southern Corp. train bound for the Philadelphia area and carrying heavy Canadian crude oil derailed in Vandergrift in Western Pennsylvania on Thursday, the company confirmed. Twenty-one tank cars came off the track and at least three tank cars leaked crude oil onto the ground, said a Norfolk Southern spokesman. There were no injuries or fire. The thick, heavy petroleum from the Canadian oil sands is not as explosive as the light, volatile North Dakota crude that has been involved in several recent rail accidents that caused explosions.
NEWS
February 5, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Carrie Goretzka's two young girls ran out onto the porch of their suburban home 30 miles east of Pittsburgh in the late afternoon on June 2, 2009, what they saw was a scene of unrelenting horror. "Mommy, Mommy," yelled the oldest child, 4-year-old Chloe. "Mommy is on fire. Mommy is on fire. " Moments earlier, Carrie Goretzka had stepped outside her home in Irwin, Pa., to call the power company to report an outage and downed line on her property. She either stumbled into the line or it fell on top of her - no one knows for sure.
NEWS
July 19, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the first time in nearly 50 years, in-state students attending Pennsylvania State University will face no tuition increase for the next academic year. Reversing a proposal announced Thursday that would have raised tuition 2.7 percent, or $450, for in-state students attending the main campus, the university's board of trustees on Friday unanimously approved the tuition freeze. The break will require the board to cut as much as $17 million from the annual budget. The tuition break applies to Pennsylvania residents attending all of the university's 19 undergraduate campuses.
BUSINESS
September 28, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sunoco Inc. announced Wednesday that its shuttered Marcus Hook refinery would be reborn as a facility to process Marcellus Shale natural-gas products, fueling new construction and traffic through the Delaware River port. Sunoco's pipeline subsidiary, Sunoco Logistics Partners L.P., is moving forward with a plan to transport high-value propane and ethane by pipeline from Western Pennsylvania to Marcus Hook, where the materials will be processed in a new plant and shipped by sea to domestic and export markets.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is out with the old and in with the new at the 500-acre waterfront facility formerly known as the Sunoco Marcus Hook Refinery, now the Marcus Hook Industrial Complex. Workers last week ripped down aging petroleum-processing equipment, part of a labyrinth of machinery that has produced gasoline, diesel, and kerosene for more than a century. Other crews built cryogenic storage tanks more than 130 feet tall with three-foot-thick walls that will hold the future: new fuels from the prolific Marcellus Shale region.
NEWS
November 16, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA For years, Omar Sharif Cash honed a reputation for increasingly violent crimes and escaping prosecution. Cash's criminal career ended in spring 2008, in a violent three weeks when he killed a Philadelphia man and, while on the run, carjacked a Bucks County couple, and killed the man and raped his fiancee. He was arrested shortly afterward. On Friday, it took a Philadelphia jury of 10 women and two men barely 90 minutes to sentence Cash to death by lethal injection for the execution-style slaying of a man polishing his car outside a Frankford car wash.
NEWS
November 13, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
For many who spoke up at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's public meeting here last week on limiting carbon pollution from power plants - no matter which side they took - it all came down to this: their children. "It's time to clean up the air for the health of our children," said Gretchen Dahlkemper-Alfonso, a Philadelphia mother of three and a leader of the environmental group Moms Clean Air Force. Bryan Palko was worried about his offspring, too, but for a different reason.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
An elaborate plan by Sunoco Logistics Partners L.P. to transport Marcellus Shale natural gas liquids by pipeline across Pennsylvania to Marcus Hook is running into resistance. The company's subsidiary, Sunoco Pipeline L.P., last month filed an application with the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission to sidestep local zoning restrictions to build pump and valve control stations in 31 municipalities crossed by the pipeline. Sunoco Pipeline argues that it is a "public utility corporation," and that the PUC can exempt the construction of the above-ground structure from local zoning if it determines the buildings are "reasonably necessary for the convenience or welfare of the public.
NEWS
February 25, 2012 | Associated Press
CLINTONVILLE, Pa. - A 10-mile stretch of Interstate 80 in Western Pennsylvania was closed for hours Saturday after a series of crashes involving at least 20 vehicles left three people dead. Venango County 911 supervisor Mary Beth White said the chairn-reaction crashes began in the snow about 2:20 p.m. Vehicles either crashed into one another or into a median strip. White said there are three confirmed fatalities. The county coroner did not immediately return calls. The same snowy weather prompted a 30-vehicle crash on Interstate 79 in western Pennsylvania, but no serious injuries or fatalities were reported.
NEWS
March 23, 2013
GREENSBURG, Pa. - The caretaker of a Western Pennsylvania mansion faces criminal charges for allegedly drinking more than $100,000 worth of the owner's whiskey. John Saunders, 62, of Irwin, is charged by Scottdale police with receiving stolen property and theft, the Greensburg Tribune-Review reported. - AP
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NEWS
July 19, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the first time in nearly 50 years, in-state students attending Pennsylvania State University will face no tuition increase for the next academic year. Reversing a proposal announced Thursday that would have raised tuition 2.7 percent, or $450, for in-state students attending the main campus, the university's board of trustees on Friday unanimously approved the tuition freeze. The break will require the board to cut as much as $17 million from the annual budget. The tuition break applies to Pennsylvania residents attending all of the university's 19 undergraduate campuses.
SPORTS
May 16, 2015 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
Not long ago, a father could not cry. He had been diagnosed with cancer in his jaw in 2013, and it had returned last year, and the chemotherapy and radiation treatments had cost him his tear ducts. The fluid backed up, infecting his eyes. So in the middle of April, he underwent surgery. The doctors inserted a temporary tube that ran from his eyeballs to his palate and drained the tears away. "It's always something," Jim Kelly said recently. "But you know what? Oh, well. " He was talking on the phone about the sequence of events, some of them serendipitous, some of them tragic, that would bring him to Philadelphia this weekend, to celebrate good news and a righteous cause.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Penn National Gaming Inc. said Monday that it wants to withdraw as operator of a proposed $225 million casino in Lawrence County, north of Pittsburgh, that is backed by Philadelphia-area investors. "We are disappointed to be withdrawing from this project," B.J. Fair, chief development officer for Penn National Gaming, said in a statement. "However, given the continued softness in the economy and the level of market saturation - not just in Western Pennsylvania, but across the commonwealth - we are regrettably unable to justify this investment at the statutorily required spending levels," he said.
NEWS
March 31, 2015
LET'S CONSIDER the complex case of one Marcus Brown. It involves apparel, yard signs, social media, politics and race. It's a stunning example of narrow-minded self interest vs. sane public policy. In January, Brown was nominated by Gov. Wolf to head the Pennsylvania State Police after heading the Maryland State Police. A principal reason he was picked, according to Wolf at the time, was his "recruiting in areas with high minority populations and historically black colleges.
NEWS
February 18, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Princeton University on Monday announced its largest gift in history: a rare book and manuscript collection - including the first six printed editions of the Bible - valued at nearly $300 million. The 2,500-volume collection, which includes an original printing of the Declaration of Independence and Beethoven's autographed music sketchbook, has been housed at Princeton's Firestone Library since 1959. That's when alum and Philadelphia native William H. Scheide moved it there from Titusville in Western Pennsylvania, the town where he was reared.
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gloria Matthews Butcosk, 93, a former head of the home economics department at Haddon Township High School, died Tuesday, Jan. 6, at the Evergreens, a retirement community in Moorestown, where she had lived for the last nine years. Sandy Rugart Howe, Class of 1972, said Mrs. Butcosk "was a friend of the family and my most influential teacher. " Mrs. Butcosk's classes focused on such necessary skills as proper nutrition, budgeting, and child-rearing. "In this day and age, people go to the Internet to learn things," Howe noted.
NEWS
December 6, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Reported spending in this year's Pennsylvania race for governor hit a record $82.3 million Thursday, as the last two contenders filed their postelection campaign-finance reports. Gov.-elect Tom Wolf, a Democrat, and his Republican rival, Gov. Corbett, spent about $9 million between them in the final five weeks of the campaign, the reports show. Wolf spent $4.6 million and Corbett $4.3 million during that period. Overall, Wolf outspent Corbett by $32.5 million to $28 million. Three losing candidates in the Democratic primary raised and spent just under $22 million.
BUSINESS
October 30, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
At a meeting Tuesday of gambling regulators from around the world, Mayor Nutter urged the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board to finally vote on the second casino license in Philadelphia. "The record's been closed for some time," said Nutter, referring to public suitability hearings, where applicants made their cases before the board members - which took place eight months ago at the Convention Center. Speaking generally of deliberative bodies, Nutter said, "Taking action is very important.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Louisiana oil spill is adding to anxiety for Pennsylvania residents who live near the Mariner East pipeline connecting the Marcellus Shale to Marcus Hook. Sunoco Logistics Partners L.P. of Philadelphia on Tuesday supervised cleanup operations in Northwest Louisiana after its Mid-Valley pipeline on Monday leaked thousands of gallons of crude oil into a creek that feeds Lake Caddo, near Shreveport. Monday's incident was the second major spill along the 65-year-old Mid-Valley pipeline this year.
NEWS
October 10, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
I COULDN'T DO what Elissa Davey does. My heart couldn't bear it. She claims the bodies or cremated remains of abandoned children. She provides them with a name and a funeral. As she told me this week: "Babies who die deserve more than a toe tag with a number on it. They deserve to have their lives acknowledged, no matter how briefly they lived. " Davey performs these acts of love in donated cemetery space in seven counties in California through her nonprofit, Garden of Innocence, founded in 1999.
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