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Western Union

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BUSINESS
April 5, 1989 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
As part of its continuing effort to cut costs, Western Union Corp. said yesterday that it would close its central telephone bureau in Moorestown in August, a move that will affect 383 full-time and 124 part-time employees. The Moorestown office, opened in 1971, handled mailgrams, telegrams and cablegrams for customers in the eastern United States. Functions now performed there will be moved to offices in Bridgeton, Mo., and Reno, Nev., the company said yesterday. Customers will have the same access to the Western Union system through an 800 telephone number, the company said.
NEWS
April 12, 1989 | By Judy Baehr, Special to The Inquirer
The news that Western Union was closing its plant at 308 W. Route 38 in Moorestown came as a shock to the 507 people who work there, even though some had seen the handwriting on the wall. In the four months before the doors close on Aug. 1, however, the company, the township and the employees are pulling together to "go out shining," as plant director Sandi DeStefano put it. DeStefano was among five members of a management team that went from room to room April 4 to break the news to the employees.
NEWS
April 12, 1989 | By Judy Baehr, Special to The Inquirer
The news that Western Union was closing its plant at 308 W. Route 38 in Moorestown came as a shock to the 507 people who work there, even though some had seen the handwriting on the wall. In the four months before the doors close on Aug. 1, however, the company, the township and the employees are pulling together to "go out shining," as plant director Sandi DeStefano put it. DeStefano was among five members of a management team that went from room to room April 4 to break the news to the employees.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A New York investor will acquire control of Western Union Corp. for $25 million in cash and combine it with an international telex operation he will buy from ITT Corp., it was announced yesterday. The plan engineered by Bennett S. LeBow is designed to rescue Western Union, the nation's oldest telecommunications company, which lost $556 million last year and has been struggling to avert bankruptcy. LeBow's plan differs from previous rescue plans because it would keep Western Union in telecommunications instead of converting it into a financial- services company.
NEWS
July 16, 2012 | Michael Smerconish
Our three boys have outgrown a small ATV given to them a few years ago by their grandmother. When the middle son asked me if they could sell it on Craigslist with an eye toward a larger model, I said fine, thinking that letting him handle the transaction would be a learning experience. It was, for both of us. Wilson, age 14, sampled the market and concluded that five-year-old models like ours were selling for around $1,500. So he decided to list ours for $1,450. There was immediate interest, first from a neighbor looking for an ATV for his daughter.
NEWS
August 5, 1993 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William G. Smith Sr., 81, of Havertown, a retired Western Union executive who smoked Cuban cigars with President John F. Kennedy and played poker with President Harry S. Truman, died Monday at Fitzgerald Mercy Hospital in Darby. On occasion, while assigned by Western Union to the White House press corps in the early 1960s, Mr. Smith would sit and chat with President Kennedy at the end of the day, said his son William G. Jr. Mr. Smith worked 48 years for Western Union and traveled on many presidential campaigns, including those of Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower and Kennedy.
NEWS
October 25, 1989 | By William D. Smith, Special to The Inquirer
Pat Henning of Delran had been working in Western Union's public relations department in Moorestown since February 1982. "I really enjoyed my job in the customer relations department," said Henning. On April 5, the announcement from the company that it planned to close the Moorestown location filled her office with a sense of shock. Then followed a different emotion: What would she do now? Last week, Henning completed a three-week course for dislocated workers at Burlington County College's Levitt Center in Willingboro.
NEWS
September 15, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Josephine Cimino, 67, a retired editorial assistant at The Inquirer, died of Alzheimer's disease Monday, Aug. 29, at Voorhees Care & Rehabilitation Center. Ms. Cimino, known as "Josie," joined the newsroom staff in 1989, after 26 years with Western Union. She was hired by Karen Knoll Bergbauer, a former Western Union colleague who was the newsroom's office manager. "At the time, Western Union was closing and The Inquirer was hiring editorial assistants. Josie was my first choice," Bergbauer said.
NEWS
July 11, 1987 | By Gerald B. Jordan, Inquirer Washington Bureau (United Press International and Reuters contributed to this article.)
Lt. Col. Oliver L. North, who has taken his message to the American people this week, took messages from the American people to Congress yesterday. North placed on the witness table in front of him two stacks of telegrams that expressed overwhelming support for his testimony before the congressional Iran-contra committees. Most of the messages, which North's attorney made available to reporters, reflected conservative political views, extolling North's bravery and - in some cases - calling members of the congressional committees "communists.
NEWS
October 19, 1992 | by Scott Huler, Daily News Staff Writer
You don't seem to get many telegrams anymore. Fax machines spew out reams of paper every day, with right-this-minute messages from all over the globe. The telephone offers instantaneous access to anywhere in the world for anybody with a quarter or a credit card. Delivery services climb all over each other offering ever-cheaper ways to send anything to anybody, anyplace, overnight. So it's no wonder a method of hurry-up communication as prosaic as the telegram, which even at its hand-delivered best can only promise a delivery time of from two to four hours, is dwindling to extinction, right?
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 20, 2016 | By Michael Boren, Staff Writer
Several weeks ago, Cleophus Robinson received a text message from a number he did not recognize saying a family member was in a bad car accident. So Robinson called the number. The man who answered claimed to be a criminal from Colombia and said he was holding Robinson's daughter hostage. He ordered the Camden father to pay $500. "If you hang up the phone, I'm going to put a bullet to her head," Robinson, 59, said the man told him. When the man refused to let Robinson speak to his daughter, Robinson said, he hung up. Then he called her work phone.
NEWS
February 12, 2016 | By Jason Nark, Staff Writer
A MODERN-DAY Cupid is strumming love, maybe something less serious, on his ukulele, and the song is slipping out an open door in a Center City apartment to flirt with the snow flurries, just before Valentine's Day. Eric Jaffe's beard is painted as red as the heart-shape boxes all those chocolates come in. The shirt beneath his sequined vest is a shade brighter than the roses being primped in vases across the country. He's singing into a MacBook, yes, but it's just a small technological tweak on a time-honored tradition, a unique way to say "I like you" or something more serious on the holiday that seems to demand it. Jaffe, 26, is filming a singing telegram to send out to customers and their crushes on Sunday morning via email or a YouTube link.
NEWS
January 8, 2013 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first curious call to Delta Market Research came Dec. 19 from a check-cashing company in North Carolina. Over the next week, dozens more came, all asking about job offers as "product testers" and "customer-service evaluators. " Each call concerned a letter sent nationwide on letterhead emblazoned with the Hatboro company's name that included a $1,450 check to provide "shopping" money and tester pay. According to the pitch, Delta was "running a survey for Western Union," among other companies, and sought the testers' "honest and productive opinions" about them.
NEWS
July 16, 2012 | Michael Smerconish
Our three boys have outgrown a small ATV given to them a few years ago by their grandmother. When the middle son asked me if they could sell it on Craigslist with an eye toward a larger model, I said fine, thinking that letting him handle the transaction would be a learning experience. It was, for both of us. Wilson, age 14, sampled the market and concluded that five-year-old models like ours were selling for around $1,500. So he decided to list ours for $1,450. There was immediate interest, first from a neighbor looking for an ATV for his daughter.
NEWS
September 15, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Josephine Cimino, 67, a retired editorial assistant at The Inquirer, died of Alzheimer's disease Monday, Aug. 29, at Voorhees Care & Rehabilitation Center. Ms. Cimino, known as "Josie," joined the newsroom staff in 1989, after 26 years with Western Union. She was hired by Karen Knoll Bergbauer, a former Western Union colleague who was the newsroom's office manager. "At the time, Western Union was closing and The Inquirer was hiring editorial assistants. Josie was my first choice," Bergbauer said.
NEWS
July 29, 2010
NEXT WEEK, our family is visiting London as part of our summer vacation. While my wife is showing the kids Big Ben, I'll be looking for royalty. But I'm not going to Buckingham Palace. Instead, I'm staking out the Western Union office at Lei- cester Square. Why there? Well, two months ago, I received an e-mail from a female friend with a most distressing story. She said she'd been robbed in the U.K. and asked that I quickly wire her some cash so she could pay her hotel bill and make her flight home.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2010 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
A slow-stewed legal mess finally hit the Common Pleas Court fan last week as a coalition of disgruntled restaurateurs, a neighborhood association, and a state representative filed a lawsuit in their quest to wrench a Pennsylvania-owned wine boutique out from the heart of Jose Garces' new BYOB. As an industry observer, I feel their competitive pain. The red-hot Iron Chef is the last restaurateur who needs a state-boosted advantage over his competitors, which is how the plaintiffs (with their costly liquor licenses, liability insurance, and triple markups)
NEWS
January 24, 2010 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
MIREBALAIS, Haiti - Luc Bouquet set foot in the United States for the first time in August 1988 and built himself a life that by any measure would be considered an immigrant's dream. But he has never felt at home in his adopted country. Born in Mirebalais, a small village in the Goat Mountains about 40 miles outside Port-au-Prince, Bouquet was essentially an orphan. After his mother died when he was 7, his father abandoned the family. Bouquet managed to get himself through high school, was sponsored to attend Johnson Bible College in Knoxville, Tenn.
NEWS
May 27, 2006 | Inquirer staff
One man pleaded guilty this week to charges of operating a business in Philadelphia that illegally transmitted money out of the country, federal authorities said yesterday. Another man was sentenced this week on similar charges. Seide Venord was sentenced Wednesday to 30 months in federal prison after being convicted in January of laundering more than $267,000 in what he believed was drug money through his business to the Dominican Republic. Venord ran Venord Multiple Services at 4922 N. Fifth St. and was a legitimate transmitter for Western Union, Vigo Remittance and Girosol Corp.
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