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NEWS
July 30, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
The William Penn Foundation's new leader will leave Aug. 31 after six months on the job. Peter J. Degnan, who came to William Penn as managing director at the beginning of March from his post as vice dean of finance and administration at the Wharton School, has tendered his resignation, foundation leaders said Monday. There will be no search for a replacement. Laura Sparks, previously chief philanthropy officer, will step into the top job, being retitled executive director, when Degnan leaves.
NEWS
May 21, 1987 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania yesterday denounced Friday's issue of the Penn student newspaper for unbalanced and "inappropriate" reporting that it said gave a "negative impression" to 3,500 alumni who visited the Penn campus last weekend. "The Wharton School strongly believes in freedom of speech and of the press, but it also believes in news reporting that reflects all facets - the positive as well as the negative - of the university," said the school's officials in a statement released yesterday.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1990 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas P. Gerrity, an international business consultant who has served on the faculty at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has been selected as the new dean of the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Gerrity, 48, the president of CSC Consulting of Boston, a division of Computer Sciences Corp. of El Segundo, Calif., an information-technology specialist, is to assume the post July 1. He succeeds Russell Palmer, who announced last June that he would step down after seven years in the dean's post.
NEWS
October 29, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Herbert R. Northrup, 89, of Haverford, professor emeritus at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and a labor specialist who developed groundbreaking theories on race in the workplace, died of a stroke Monday at Bryn Mawr Hospital. In the 1960s, while chairing the department of industry at Wharton, Dr. Northrup edited The Negro and Employment Opportunity. The book concluded that economics, not civil rights, was the chief factor underlying racial tension in the United States.
NEWS
October 29, 1991
Bill O'Brien, Republican candidate in Philadelphia's Fourth Councilmanic District, makes us believe that there is life after Frank Rizzo's death for the city's GOP. This Manayunk lawyer and former staffer to the late Sen. John Heinz comes at you with a briefcase full of ideas for attacking city woes, an impressive record of community involvement and an obvious appetite for public service. In short, voters of this district could do much, much worse. Their dilemma, and ours in making an endorsement, is that Mr. O'Brien faces an even more impressive opponent in the Democratic nominee, investment broker Michael Nutter.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Business Radio Powered by the Wharton School " debuted Monday on SiriusXM Channel 111, where drivers and other hands-free listeners can hear scholars interview corporate bosses, comment on stocks and economic news, and offer the satellite station's subscribers how-to's on starting, running and selling companies. Wharton shows now broadcast 24/7, with an average of five hours live each workday - the organizers want to expand that to eight - plus playbacks on demand. Never mind that Bloomberg, CNBC, Fox Business , and other networks already offer business radio and relentlessly query Fortune 500 bosses, investors who own their companies, and disrupters who would replace them.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1987 | By Janet L. Fix, Inquirer Staff Writer
Although the new Steinberg Conference Center won't seat its first class of executives until January, on Russell E. Palmer's books it is an investment already reaping big returns. That explains why Palmer, dean of the Wharton School, sounded like an ebullient new father last week when discussing the $24 million addition, which was dedicated Friday on the Penn campus. "We're going to have 5,000 executives through here next year," Palmer said. "So, as far as corporate contractual space is concerned, we're sold out even before we open.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, like other fancy business colleges, is staffed by professors with comfortable salaries, global contacts and lucrative consulting arrangements, punctuated by the occasional wealthy alumnus visiting to brag how he (or she) got rich. At Wharton, there's also the occasional whiff of superstar glamour - from NBA star Earvin "Magic" Johnson , tennis great Andre Agassi , rapper Chris "Ludacris" Bridges , and, later this week, the actress Eva Longoria . The invitations to visit Wharton's West Philly campus have come from Wharton alumni K. Robert "Bobby" Turner ('84)
NEWS
January 17, 1999 | By Josh Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They didn't have fax machines, cell phones or personal computers when they founded the conference 25 years ago. They didn't have much money either - only about $5,000 to put on a half-day event in a classroom at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. But Merritt Brown, Benautrice Roland Jr. and two other Wharton students did have a dream - of leaving a legacy for future African American business students at Penn. "We wanted to give black students at Wharton, as well as prospective students, a sense that business success is an attainable goal," Brown said.
NEWS
February 23, 1999 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Investigators yesterday released a composite drawing of the man they believe murdered Wharton School student Shannon Schieber last spring. The sketch was rendered with the help of a woman who was raped in Center City in August 1997. DNA tests that were completed last month linked the woman's attacker to a second rape that August and to Schieber's murder in May. Lt. Kenneth Coluzzi called the sketch "a very substantial step in the investigation. " The suspect is either "an extremely light-skinned black male or a very dark-complected or tan white male," about 25 years old with a thin build, who stands 5-foot-8 to 5-foot-10, said Coluzzi.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 30, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
The William Penn Foundation's new leader will leave Aug. 31 after six months on the job. Peter J. Degnan, who came to William Penn as managing director at the beginning of March from his post as vice dean of finance and administration at the Wharton School, has tendered his resignation, foundation leaders said Monday. There will be no search for a replacement. Laura Sparks, previously chief philanthropy officer, will step into the top job, being retitled executive director, when Degnan leaves.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edwin J. Poplawski, 88, of Springfield, Delaware County, a banker, World War II veteran, and community organizer, died Wednesday, July 9, of lung cancer at Vitas Hospice at Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital. Mr. Poplawski worked for 23 years at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia and another 23 years at the First Pennsylvania Bank before retiring as an assistant vice president in 1989. As part of his job, Mr. Poplawski created and launched technical designs in the areas of computer automation, advanced security functions, and data integrity and controls.
NEWS
July 3, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frank E. Greenberg, 81, formerly of Penn Valley, a Philadelphia lawyer and standout track and field official, died Sunday, June 29, at an assisted-living facility in Palm Harbor, Fla., of complications associated with Alzheimer's disease. He had been ill for several years, said his friend Stuart Gellman. Born in Philadelphia, he graduated from Overbrook High School in 1950, and earned an undergraduate degree from the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School of Business and a degree from Penn's Law School.
SPORTS
June 6, 2014 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
AFTER SUFFERING their seventh shutout in their previous 27 games and with everyone from your barber to a current coach questioning whether the Phillies are even a major league product, the drumbeat to replace Ruben Amaro Jr. as general manager is louder now than any sound emanating from the ballpark these days. Gone are the ebbs and flows of his six-season tenure as the GM, a tenure marked by league-shattering blockbuster trades in both directions, a tenure marked by dozens of minor leaguers being pushed from team to team like poker chips, most becoming little more than tips to a cocktail waitress.
SPORTS
June 2, 2014 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Andy Reid was fired by the Eagles after the 2012 season, he decided he wanted to get back to doing what he does best: coaching. Reid returned to Philadelphia on Saturday to appear on a panel with Atlanta Falcons general manager Thomas Dimitroff at the NFL's Career Development Symposium at Penn's Wharton School. The topic was managing key relationships, and the audience included 70 NFL assistant coaches and player-personnel executives aspiring for bigger jobs. Reid fielded a question about evaluating his shortcomings.
NEWS
May 9, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA & DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writers vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
JANA CURRIER helped her nephew pick out his engagement ring. "He chose the most perfect stone," Currier said last night as she choked back tears. "He was going to propose in June. They had it all planned out. "He was over the moon. " She spoke in the past tense because Zachary Woods will never get the chance to carry out that proposal. The man, whom his aunt described as "exceptional," died late Tuesday, hours after he was struck by a car in University City. "I can't tell you how many times I've said throughout his life that they don't make them any better than Zach," Currier said.
NEWS
May 1, 2014
  KATLYN GRASSO, 20, a Wharton School junior, is CEO and founder of GenHERation, an online leadership portal for high school girls. GenHERation provides girls with an opportunity to work with national corporations and nonprofits to become catalysts for social change. Grasso has raised about $25,000 from various Wharton grants and venture funds to start up GenHERation. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for GenHERation? A: I've always been passionate about helping girls achieve personally and professionally.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Business Radio Powered by the Wharton School " debuted Monday on SiriusXM Channel 111, where drivers and other hands-free listeners can hear scholars interview corporate bosses, comment on stocks and economic news, and offer the satellite station's subscribers how-to's on starting, running and selling companies. Wharton shows now broadcast 24/7, with an average of five hours live each workday - the organizers want to expand that to eight - plus playbacks on demand. Never mind that Bloomberg, CNBC, Fox Business , and other networks already offer business radio and relentlessly query Fortune 500 bosses, investors who own their companies, and disrupters who would replace them.
SPORTS
March 21, 2014 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Eagles cornerback Troy Vincent was named the NFL's executive vice president of football operations, a major promotion for the 43-year-old Pennsbury High School alumnus. In his new role, Vincent will oversee all of the league's football operations. Those include officiating, on-field discipline, and player personnel, among other areas. He will also be a nonvoting member of the league's competition committee. "We will emphasize clarity, consistency, and credibility to ensure the highest standards and best practices for our teams and fans," Vincent said in a statement.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
His colleagues marvel at Vram S. "Ned" Nedurian's efficiency and expertise. "He handles twice as many cases as any of the other attorneys," said John F.X. Reilly, a deputy Delaware County district attorney. But what is perhaps most remarkable about Nedurian is his age: 90. And on Friday, he was at the center of a closely guarded secret in the Delaware County District Attorney's Office. For weeks, colleagues had been planning his 50th work-anniversary celebration. Late Friday morning, 200 friends, attorneys, judges and coworkers jammed into the council meeting room to honor Nedurian, who thought he was there to attend a mandatory staff meeting.
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