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NEWS
May 21, 1987 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania yesterday denounced Friday's issue of the Penn student newspaper for unbalanced and "inappropriate" reporting that it said gave a "negative impression" to 3,500 alumni who visited the Penn campus last weekend. "The Wharton School strongly believes in freedom of speech and of the press, but it also believes in news reporting that reflects all facets - the positive as well as the negative - of the university," said the school's officials in a statement released yesterday.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1990 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas P. Gerrity, an international business consultant who has served on the faculty at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has been selected as the new dean of the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Gerrity, 48, the president of CSC Consulting of Boston, a division of Computer Sciences Corp. of El Segundo, Calif., an information-technology specialist, is to assume the post July 1. He succeeds Russell Palmer, who announced last June that he would step down after seven years in the dean's post.
NEWS
October 29, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Herbert R. Northrup, 89, of Haverford, professor emeritus at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and a labor specialist who developed groundbreaking theories on race in the workplace, died of a stroke Monday at Bryn Mawr Hospital. In the 1960s, while chairing the department of industry at Wharton, Dr. Northrup edited The Negro and Employment Opportunity. The book concluded that economics, not civil rights, was the chief factor underlying racial tension in the United States.
NEWS
October 29, 1991
Bill O'Brien, Republican candidate in Philadelphia's Fourth Councilmanic District, makes us believe that there is life after Frank Rizzo's death for the city's GOP. This Manayunk lawyer and former staffer to the late Sen. John Heinz comes at you with a briefcase full of ideas for attacking city woes, an impressive record of community involvement and an obvious appetite for public service. In short, voters of this district could do much, much worse. Their dilemma, and ours in making an endorsement, is that Mr. O'Brien faces an even more impressive opponent in the Democratic nominee, investment broker Michael Nutter.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Business Radio Powered by the Wharton School " debuted Monday on SiriusXM Channel 111, where drivers and other hands-free listeners can hear scholars interview corporate bosses, comment on stocks and economic news, and offer the satellite station's subscribers how-to's on starting, running and selling companies. Wharton shows now broadcast 24/7, with an average of five hours live each workday - the organizers want to expand that to eight - plus playbacks on demand. Never mind that Bloomberg, CNBC, Fox Business , and other networks already offer business radio and relentlessly query Fortune 500 bosses, investors who own their companies, and disrupters who would replace them.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1987 | By Janet L. Fix, Inquirer Staff Writer
Although the new Steinberg Conference Center won't seat its first class of executives until January, on Russell E. Palmer's books it is an investment already reaping big returns. That explains why Palmer, dean of the Wharton School, sounded like an ebullient new father last week when discussing the $24 million addition, which was dedicated Friday on the Penn campus. "We're going to have 5,000 executives through here next year," Palmer said. "So, as far as corporate contractual space is concerned, we're sold out even before we open.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, like other fancy business colleges, is staffed by professors with comfortable salaries, global contacts and lucrative consulting arrangements, punctuated by the occasional wealthy alumnus visiting to brag how he (or she) got rich. At Wharton, there's also the occasional whiff of superstar glamour - from NBA star Earvin "Magic" Johnson , tennis great Andre Agassi , rapper Chris "Ludacris" Bridges , and, later this week, the actress Eva Longoria . The invitations to visit Wharton's West Philly campus have come from Wharton alumni K. Robert "Bobby" Turner ('84)
NEWS
January 17, 1999 | By Josh Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They didn't have fax machines, cell phones or personal computers when they founded the conference 25 years ago. They didn't have much money either - only about $5,000 to put on a half-day event in a classroom at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. But Merritt Brown, Benautrice Roland Jr. and two other Wharton students did have a dream - of leaving a legacy for future African American business students at Penn. "We wanted to give black students at Wharton, as well as prospective students, a sense that business success is an attainable goal," Brown said.
NEWS
February 23, 1999 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Investigators yesterday released a composite drawing of the man they believe murdered Wharton School student Shannon Schieber last spring. The sketch was rendered with the help of a woman who was raped in Center City in August 1997. DNA tests that were completed last month linked the woman's attacker to a second rape that August and to Schieber's murder in May. Lt. Kenneth Coluzzi called the sketch "a very substantial step in the investigation. " The suspect is either "an extremely light-skinned black male or a very dark-complected or tan white male," about 25 years old with a thin build, who stands 5-foot-8 to 5-foot-10, said Coluzzi.
NEWS
October 7, 1998 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The deans of two of the University of Pennsylvania's most prestigious schools - law and business - announced independently yesterday that they will step down when the academic year ends in the summer of 1999. Colin S. Diver, 54, who has been dean at Penn's law school for a decade, said he had achieved the goals he set out for the school, and planned to return to teaching there full time. Thomas P. Gerrity, 57, dean of the Wharton School for eight years, said he wanted to spend more time with his family and explore more thoroughly some of his theories in the field of management.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 11, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Back in 2013, a Wharton School student group provoked indignation in India by uninviting then-Gujarat state official Narendra Modi to address its yearly Wharton India Economic Forum . At the time, the State Department was still reviewing Modi's role in Hindu-Muslim violence a decade earlier. Indian courts exonerated Modi, but he still could not get a visa to come here - or permission to address students by satellite. The Wharton students' uninvite provoked some big Indian companies to disinvite themselves from that year's India Forum, embarrassing the school as it recruited vigorously for students and corporate partners in the world's largest democracy.
NEWS
February 5, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gary Bromberg, 83, of Springfield, Montgomery County, a commercial insurance broker and an artist, died Saturday, Jan. 31, of multiple myeloma at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., Mr. Bromberg moved to the Wynnefield section of Philadelphia with his family when he was 5. He graduated from Overbrook High School and from Pennsylvania State University with the Class of 1953. While there, he pledged Beta Sigma Pi fraternity. Mr. Bromberg did further study at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School.
NEWS
February 5, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mark L. Gushner, 80, of Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., a former co-owner and operator of Boyd's Philadelphia, died Thursday, Jan. 29, of Parkinson's disease and a blood cancer at the Hospice of Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center. Mr. Gushner lived in Gladwyne before retiring to Florida in 2004. Starting in 1968, Mr. Gushner was instrumental in the expansion and success of Boyd's, the clothing store founded by his father and two uncles in 1938. Formerly at 1217 Market St., the store is now at 1818 Chestnut St. "My father worked there from the time he was in high school," said son Jimmy.
NEWS
January 25, 2015 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
At Harriton High School in Lower Merion, Joe Dillon avoided the party crowd. But after a girlfriend broke his heart, his buddies talked him into drinking. On the night of August 9, 1976, Dillon, then 21, was drunk when he decided to dive off a wall into the bay at Somers Point, N.J. He dove 13 feet - into what turned out to be 18 inches of water, shattering his fourth cervical vertebra into splinters. His head was attached to his body by only his spinal cord and ligaments. At the hospital, he was put into traction, and for the first six weeks, all he could do was wiggle his shoulders.
BUSINESS
January 1, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jumping on the interest generated by President Obama's new policy on Cuba, the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania said Tuesday that it would conduct a conference April 1 in New York City for companies and executives interested in doing business in the Caribbean nation. "This is going to be a really big change for the entire region, and a historic change for relations between the United States and Cuba," said Mukul Pandya, editor-in-chief of Knowledge@Wharton , who will host the Cuba Opportunity Summit.
NEWS
December 20, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former Philadelphia publishing company owner and his companion were struck and killed by a car Wednesday night while crossing the street near their new home in Deerfield Beach, Fla. The Broward County Sheriff's Office said Philip J. Kendall, 85, former president of Packard Press, and Francine Freedman, 80, had moved to the beachside community near Boca Raton this week. At 7:06 p.m., the two were crossing Ocean Drive at mid-block when a 2007 Lexus RX350 driven by Mark Lasman, 64, of Boca Raton, hit them, the Sheriff's Office said.
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
MICHELLE Simmons started selling drugs at age 13, sneaking weed from her family's stash. "I would take it to school and sell it for a dollar, so I could buy me some Now & Laters," the Germantown native said. "I went to jail in eighth grade. " Jail didn't stop her. By 18, she was driving up and down the East Coast transporting drugs. By her 20s, she was addicted to drugs and prostituting herself for as little as $5 a john to pay for her next high. Once, in Los Angeles, she got arrested so often along one "ho stroll" street that cops banned her and vowed to arrest her on sight if she returned.
NEWS
December 6, 2014 | By Joe Dolinsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jack C. Briscoe, 94, of Drexel Hill, a longtime Philadelphia lawyer and a professor of law at the University of Pennsylvania, died Monday, Dec. 1, of heart failure at the Sunrise of Granite Run senior living home in Media. Born in 1920 in Bradford, Pa., Mr. Briscoe was the son of an oil industry worker, Park H., and a homemaker, Gertrude. Mr. Briscoe graduated from Bradford High School in 1937 before attending the University of Pennsylvania. To help pay for the cost of tuition, Mr. Briscoe worked as a locomotive fireman on the Pennsylvania Railroad Seashore Line.
NEWS
December 5, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Irvin J. Borowsky, 90, of Philadelphia, a television-industry visionary, publisher, and philanthropist, died Tuesday, Nov. 25, of causes related to aging at his home. In 1948, Mr. Borowsky started TV Digest, a magazine that listed programs for the 50,000 area residents who at that time had TV sets. He built up the paid circulation to over 300,000 and extended a contract to Channel 6 guaranteeing that if it showed movies - a rarity on TV then - the publication would purchase advertising time on them.
NEWS
December 3, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The nonjury trial for a Delaware County woman accused in the stabbing death of her husband, a former University of Pennsylvania basketball player, began Monday with testimony from a close friend and police. Matthew White was the starting center on the 1979 Penn team that reached the NCAA Final Four. At issue is not whether Maria Garcia-Pellon killed White as he lay sleeping in bed at their Nether Providence home. She has admitted the killing to police. The question is whether she is not guilty by reason of insanity or guilty but mentally ill. "This defendant appreciated right from wrong the night she stabbed him," prosecutor Kathleen McGee said in her opening statements.
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