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BUSINESS
August 2, 1988 | By Janet L. Fix, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amid staff defections and sluggish business, Butcher & Singer Inc., one of the city's oldest brokerage firms, yesterday agreed to be acquired by Wheat, First Securities Inc. of Richmond. After a marathon weekend negotiating session, the two firms tentatively agreed to a deal in which Butcher & Singer's retail operation and Wheat, First will become subsidiaries of a new holding company, WBF Securities Inc. WBF Securities, in turn, will be owned by Wheat's existing parent company, WFS Financial Co. The deal does not mean the end to a familiar Philadelphia name.
NEWS
May 11, 2012 | By Nirmala George, Associated Press
NEW DELHI - In fields along a northern Indian highway, mountains of grain have turned black with mildew after getting soaked in the rain. The millions of tons of wheat rotting because India ran out of warehouse space to hold another bumper crop illustrate a core problem of the nation's food crisis: India can grow plenty of food but cannot store or transport it well enough to nourish its 1.2 billion people. Warehouses are overflowing and huge quantities of wheat and rice are stored in fields under tarpaulins and thin plastic sheets, risking decay.
FOOD
August 19, 1987 | By POLLY FISHER, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: When substituting whole wheat-flour for all-purpose flour in baking recipes, is it necessary to adjust the quantity of flour? - A.H. Dear A.H.: Generally, no. I usually substitute an equal amount of whole- wheat flour for all-purpose flour. Sometimes, depending on the type of whole-wheat flour you have, the result can be heavier than desired, in which case a slight reduction would be advisable. However, I've found that there's no standard rule and it depends very much on the recipe and the types of flour involved, so you'll have to experiment.
NEWS
June 19, 1997 | By Msgr. S.J. Adamo
'Do you remember?" asked Googie, "Do you remember the Lord's parable about the cockle and the wheat?" "I do. " "Well," he continued, "It's happening under our very noses!"
BUSINESS
August 1, 1988 | By Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
Butcher & Singer, Philadelphia's biggest independent brokerage firm, with roots going back to the Revolution, is selling out. The firm is being acquired by another closely held, family dominated firm, Wheat, First Securities of Richmond, Va. The terms were not disclosed. McBee Butcher, chairman and chief executive, said the firm was being sold to cut costs and boost efficiencies. "There are tremendous operating economies that can be achieved by combining two operations groups," Butcher said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2007 | staff
Q: I have been told for health reasons to move away from plain flour and eat things made of whole wheat. I'd like to know more about whole-wheat pasta. Do you cook it any differently than regular pasta? Are some whole-wheat pastas better than others? I would really appreciate it if you could send me some easy recipes using whole-wheat pasta. Thanks. - Trudy W. A: Trudy, we must hang out with the same crowd, since I have also been steered down the whole-wheat path for health reasons.
FOOD
December 12, 1993 | By Jim Burns, FOR THE INQUIRER
When my wife, Barbara, recently brought home a sackful of cinnamon rolls for breakfast, I was thrilled - so thrilled that I didn't wait until morning to devour the first one. Since I have a wheat intolerance, almost anything labeled "wheat free" sends me into ecstasy, and at times I bite first - before reading the label. This roll seemed like a life-changer for me - at last, a really tasty breakfast treat that I could enjoy with no ill effects. The only problem was that the next morning I woke up feeling groggy and suspected an onset of the flu, until I noticed just how cloudy my thinking was - a sure sign that either wheat or rye had gotten into my diet.
NEWS
August 13, 2004 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Diocese of Trenton has ruled that the First Communion of a girl with a digestive disorder is invalid because the host she received was not made of wheat. Her mother is calling on the Vatican to reverse its ban on wheatless Communion wafers, saying the Monmouth County girl's condition prevents her from consuming even a small amount of the grain. On May 2, Haley Waldman, 8, of Brielle, received what she and her family thought was her First Communion from a Roman Catholic priest.
NEWS
May 24, 1992 | By Tim Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The poppies, row on row, stand waist-high by the roadside east of town. The boll of each plant oozes a thick brown sap. A fat boy scrapes the sap off each boll into a burlap sack. The ooze is opium. At a mud fort in the mountains, the opium becomes heroin. And half the heroin coursing through the veins of American addicts comes from the poppy fields of Afghanistan. The Afghan crop now coming in could yield 200 tons of heroin. It is an especially bitter harvest for the United States.
NEWS
March 14, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ilon Silverman holds the slice of bread in both hands, looking down as if he were reading it. He closes his eyes and chews. "There's not a word to describe it," he finally says. A pause. "There's probably many words. " The elusive, nuanced flavor of pain au levain - naturally leavened bread - is the reason Silverman wakes up every day. It is 9 a.m. Wednesday. He has been at the small bakery in Avondale's new natural-foods market since 3:45. Clad in a houndstooth cap and flour-stained apron, Silverman talks almost religiously about his bread, calling it "intoxicating," "zen," and "earthy.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
April 3, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Marc Vetri, chef owner of Vetri, Osteria, Amis, Alla Spina, Pizzeria Vetri, and Lo Spiedo, recently was nominated for a James Beard award for best chef in the country. He recently discussed his new book Mastering Pasta (Ten Speed Press) at the Free Library of Philadelphia. Below is a condensed version of our conversation. When was the first time you made pasta? When did you know this is what you wanted to do? Wow. I don't even really remember. My father's family, they're from Italy.
NEWS
March 14, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ilon Silverman holds the slice of bread in both hands, looking down as if he were reading it. He closes his eyes and chews. "There's not a word to describe it," he finally says. A pause. "There's probably many words. " The elusive, nuanced flavor of pain au levain - naturally leavened bread - is the reason Silverman wakes up every day. It is 9 a.m. Wednesday. He has been at the small bakery in Avondale's new natural-foods market since 3:45. Clad in a houndstooth cap and flour-stained apron, Silverman talks almost religiously about his bread, calling it "intoxicating," "zen," and "earthy.
FOOD
January 3, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Michael Solomonov was cooking at Striped Bass a decade ago, his pastrami-spiced gravlax was something of a novelty. Today, though, the smoky, briny, spicy preparation is being applied to just about everything, from the brisket with pastrami jus at Sbraga to pastrami-smoked chioggia beets at Vedge. That's no coincidence. Flavors from the old-school Jewish deli - think rye bread, bagel toppings, and a schmear of schmaltz - are among the food trends expected to bubble to the top in 2014, according to forecasters.
FOOD
January 4, 2013 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
There's no diet, it seems, without sacrifice, and a roundup of the year's diet books shows that most of the trending approaches to weight loss eschew at least one or more category of food altogether. Paleo, wheat-/gluten-free, and plant-based-diet books are the hottest categories now, promising well-being in addition to roomier pants, if you are willing to limit yourself to either hunks of meat and coconut oil or millet salads. In a totally different camp are the whole-foods proponents, whose reasoned pleas for variety are starting to sound like a cultural consensus.
NEWS
May 31, 2012
2 tablespoons malt vinegar 3 tablespoons wheat beer such as Franziskaner or Schneider Original 1 teaspoon salt Black pepper to taste 1 shallot, minced 1 tablespoon minced chives 1/2 cup vegetable oil 1 tablespoon honey     1. Combine all ingredients in a glass jar with a tight-fitting lid. 2. Shake to blend, and use immediately or keep in the refrigerator for up to a week.   From chef Jeremy Nolen of Brauhaus Schmitz   Per serving: 176 calories, 3 grams carbohydrates, 3 grams sugar, 18 grams fat, no cholesterol, 388 milligrams sodium, no dietary fiber
NEWS
May 11, 2012 | By Nirmala George, Associated Press
NEW DELHI - In fields along a northern Indian highway, mountains of grain have turned black with mildew after getting soaked in the rain. The millions of tons of wheat rotting because India ran out of warehouse space to hold another bumper crop illustrate a core problem of the nation's food crisis: India can grow plenty of food but cannot store or transport it well enough to nourish its 1.2 billion people. Warehouses are overflowing and huge quantities of wheat and rice are stored in fields under tarpaulins and thin plastic sheets, risking decay.
NEWS
March 29, 2012
Kristall weiss: A filtered version of hefeweizen.   IF THAT DEFINITION doesn't just make your skin crawl, well, you are a cold, heartless turtle. Why would anyone intentionally take one of the world's most-treasured beer styles - a variety whose unique beauty is in its murky, unfiltered body - and intentionally "cleanse" it? It's as if a brewery imagined that it could improve a Czech pilsner recipe by removing the hops and adding corn or rice. Uhhh . . . on second thought, never mind.
FOOD
February 16, 2012
Take one bite of the featherweight pitas from Feders, and you'll understand why people travel to buy them. Imported from an Israeli company and baked throughout the day in a special pita oven, the wheat are as good as the white.   - Ashley Primis Pitas, 65 cents for one, $1.75 for three, Feders Fresh Produce & Flowers, 1822 Spring Garden St. (enter on 19th Street), 215-568-8010, federsfresh.com .
FOOD
November 3, 2011 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
Maybe digestible dreams do come true, because it's now possible, as a gluten-free eater, to get decent French bread in the Philadelphia area. "Good bread was always the first thing our customers have asked for," says Regina Petruzziello Mason, owner and recipe developer at Lansdale's Virago, which sells gluten-free baguettes, Danish, hoagie rolls, even Irish soda bread in its bakery and cafe. Celiacs and the gluten-intolerant used to be the beggars at the table, accepting whatever (wheatless)
NEWS
June 19, 2011
Keep your liquor cabinet's top shelf in the loop with these latest arrivals from the West Coast's craft spirit scene, the exceptional gin and silky smooth wheat whiskey from Dry Fly in Spokane, Wash. Recently named "Distiller of the Year" by the American Distilling Institute, and newly available in Pennsylvania, Dry Fly has come a long way since it was founded four years ago by two pals on a fishing trip who ditched their corporate jobs to make artisan booze from local ingredients.
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