CollectionsWheelchair
IN THE NEWS

Wheelchair

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 9, 1997 | JIM MacMILLAN/ DAILY NEWS
About 50 people in wheelchairs blocked the driveway at the Greyhound bus terminal in Center City yesterday to protest the company's failure to provide access for the handicapped to its buses. Police made no arrests.
NEWS
July 30, 2002
I have spinal muscular atrophy, which makes me wheelchair-bound. And I see a problem with wheelchair accessibility. First, in the School District of Philadelphia, the majority of the elementary schools seem to be without an elevator. That means students with disabilities have to find a different school to attend. I had to wait at least two months to attend my neighborhood school, Strawberry Mansion Middle/High School in North Philadelphia, in 2000. The school wasn't wheelchair accessible.
NEWS
January 9, 2003 | By Hannah McCullough
On Saturday, I intended to drive an old friend to the recycling center to be crushed. Our reliable companion had not lost its energy or mobility but was bored just sitting in the garage. Our friend, an $8,000 motorized wheelchair, very nearly became an innocent victim of our throwaway society. My mother, a stroke survivor with one leg and one arm, died July 23. The wheelchair had served her well, giving her daily independence and freedom, regularly and reliably, for five years.
NEWS
December 8, 1987 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, Daily News Staff Writer
SEPTA will remove seats from rail cars on its regional line to make room for people in wheelchairs as the result of a lawsuit against the transit authority. A federal judge yesterday ordered SEPTA to make rail cars wheelchair- accessible by March 1, but a SEPTA spokeswoman said the work was already under way. SEPTA agreed to the arrangement as the result of a suit filed in March 1986 by Disabled in Action and others. DIA president Steve Margolis said the agreement means wheelchair-bound people will be able to ride commuter trains "for the first time.
NEWS
April 12, 1989 | BY MARGARET GREENFIELD
Robin Palley's March 23 article about the experience of Jerry Rhoten, a Virginian in Philadelphia for medical treatment, reveals the positive attitudes and heroic achievements of this man and his doctors. However, it also shows a public attitude towards a human being so shocking that it is beyond belief! Every time I ride through Philadelphia, I am distressed at the environmental ugliness of a once-beautiful city. Now I am more than distressed at an equally ugly treatment of a man in the city of "Brotherly Love.
NEWS
April 18, 2009 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A man in a motorized wheelchair was killed and two dozen SEPTA bus passengers were shaken up in a grinding crash yesterday afternoon. SEPTA spokesman Richard Maloney said the crash happened about 4:15 p.m. on Eighth Street just south of Girard Avenue. Maloney said it appeared that the man was crossing Eighth from the west when a westbound 47 bus was turning left onto Eighth from Girard. The crash happened near the intersection, which has a hair salon on the southwest corner and a gas station on the southeast.
NEWS
July 27, 2011 | By Alia Conley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eileen Sabel's protest signs could be seen from all angles. She had a flier taped in front on her lap and three big signs fastened on the other sides of her wheelchair. Sabel, known as "Spitfire," wants wheelchair-accessible taxicabs. Monday night, when a bus she was riding broke down, she had to steer her powered wheelchair home in the rain. "I'm not a villain," said Sabel, 61, who lives in Germantown. "It's not fair. The word is dignity . " About 200 protesters from three groups gathered Tuesday morning outside the Convention Center to demand accessible taxicabs.
NEWS
January 14, 1986 | By Susan Caba, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA is seeking $12 million in damages from a Colorado manufacturing firm that SEPTA says failed to provide properly working wheelchair lifts for 150 buses. In a suit filed in U.S. District Court yesterday, the SEPTA accused the firm of breaching its contract to provide the buses, breaching warranties, negligence and misrepresentation. SEPTA is seeking $2 million in compensatory damages from Neoplan USA, of Lamar, Colo., and $10 million in punitive damages. A spokeswoman for Neoplan said the firm's officials had not seen the court papers and would have no comment on the lawsuit.
NEWS
September 25, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
A WHEELCHAIR-BOUND man allegedly stabbed an acquaintance five times in the leg when the victim refused to buy the man's Xbox early Sunday morning, Upper Darby police said yesterday The victim, 57, remains at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in serious condition, said Michael Chitwood, Upper Darby police superintendent. The same man who is charged in the stabbing, Andrew Hinson, was the subject of a segment on 6ABC this summer when he claimed his wheelchair was stolen from out front of his Upper Darby home.
NEWS
March 8, 1989 | By Scott Brodeur and Catherine Ross, Special to The Inquirer
A Municipal Court judge in Glassboro yesterday dismissed a motor vehicle charge against a woman in a motorized wheelchair who local police said was driving without lights. Judge Jay R. Powell threw out the charge, determining that the wheelchair was not a vehicle and not subject to the restrictions or requirements of a motor vehicle. For Monica Himes, 34, who suffers multiple sclerosis and has lived in Glassboro for seven years, the case marked another fight with borough officials that she has won. "This is an explicit example of how society does not allow the disabled to be visible," said Himes, who has brought several civil rights cases against the borough.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
Four years ago, Patricia Crebase went out to the Broad Street Run to cheer for a friend competing in the 10-mile race. "I got out on the route extra early, and I saw the wheelchair athletes go by," she said. "I just had that moment of, well, it's put up or shut up. " Crebase, an underwriter from Philadelphia, will be competing in the Philadelphia Marathon on Sunday. It is her first full marathon. Crebase, 43, has MS, which was diagnosed in 1995, and she has been in a wheelchair for 10 years.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Uber, the ride-sharing company that matches riders with drivers by smartphone app, will now provide connections to wheelchair-accessible vehicles in Philadelphia, it said Monday. Uber has contracted with licensed paratransit drivers who have accessible vehicles, and customers can begin using the service immediately, Uber spokesman Taylor Bennett said Monday. The announcement came one day before a legislative committee is to meet in Harrisburg to consider legislation that would permit Uber and other ride-share services to operate in Philadelphia and around the state.
NEWS
September 22, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
The abstract expressionist painter Anthe Zacharias hasn't shown her work in 40 years. But she's never stopped creating it. "I even paint here," she says from her wheelchair outside Riverview Estates, an assisted-living facility in Riverton, Burlington County. At 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 25 - Zacharias' 80th birthday - a limited but eclectic selection of her paintings, watercolors, and sketches will be exhibited at YogaTree in downtown Riverton. The public is welcome. The artist's last gallery show was mounted in 1974 in Manhattan, where she was a rising talent in the 1950s and '60s.
NEWS
September 18, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 2007, Erica Barker went to a Haddonfield cafe to attend the first exhibit of her paintings. The show was especially meaningful because, born without use of her arms, she had worked only with pencils and brushes held between her teeth. "Painting," she told an Inquirer interviewer at the time, "probably kept me from going crazy. " On Monday, Sept. 15, Ms. Barker, 39, of Cherry Hill, who was born with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, died at home. The cause of death has not been determined, her brother, Tony, said.
NEWS
September 1, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
As the photo essay opens, a 44-year-old man with a shaved head lies shirtless on his back in bed. The merciless morning light reveals two prescription drug containers on the night table, a medical alert tag around his neck, and a catheter tube snaking out from under the sheets. The man is Fred Schwartz, who was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 1994. His nearly deadweight legs and steadily weakening left arm render mundane tasks - such as getting up in the morning - a challenge.
NEWS
August 17, 2014 | By Franziska Holzschuh, Inquirer Staff Writer
After Javier Barraza fell off a roof five years ago and broke his back, there were days he wished he was dead. "But you know what? Doing sports helped," he said while watching quad rugby Friday at the 34th National Veterans Wheelchair Games at the Convention Center. "It brings back a lot of self-confidence. And it helps from getting depressed. " The Special Forces veteran suffered some injuries while serving, but none were as life-changing as the one he sustained as a civilian.
NEWS
August 13, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some saw combat. Some did not. Some were wounded in war. Some were not. Yet all 650 men and women streaming into Philadelphia this week to race one another along the banks of the Schuylkill, or shoot targets, swing bats, swim, or compete for medals at rugby, table tennis, basketball, and soccer have served in the military. And - like Bruce Husted of Marlton, who was thrown from a motorcycle while on active duty in the Navy in 1978 - they all compete in wheelchairs. Their numbers promise to make the 2014 National Veterans Wheelchair Games, which begin Tuesday in Philadelphia and three South Jersey towns, the largest in the Olympic-style games' 34-year history.
NEWS
June 15, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia could have dozens of wheelchair-accessible taxicabs by the end of the year, thanks in part to a federal court order signed Friday. The order was a compromise between the Philadelphia Parking Authority and Disabled in Action of Pennsylvania, and was reached after a three-year court battle. The settlement is contingent on the Pennsylvania Independent Regulatory Review Commission's approving necessary regulations next week. In the five-page decision, U.S. District Judge C. Darnell Jones III states that the Parking Authority will have to issue 150 taxicab medallions in the next 10 years exclusively for wheelchair-accessible vehicles.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
James W. Staerk, 54, a longtime prosecutor for the Montgomery County District Attorney's Office, died of spinal muscular atrophy on Thursday, April 17, in Bluffton, S.C. Mr. Staerk grew up in Abington, where he lived until retiring to South Carolina in January. He worked for 27 years as an assistant district attorney in Montgomery County, where he led the forfeiture division and seized planes, cars, houses and other assets. Diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy at age 4, Mr. Staerk was a quadriplegic and spent his life in a wheelchair, but "figured out how to do almost everything," said his sister Kathleen Allison-Earle.
NEWS
February 10, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
SOME OF THE artwork in the basement art studio that Vicki Landers and Ray Deca run in Center City brims with the perspective of the disabled artists who created it. On one canvas, "PISS on pity" is the slogan beside the symbol of a person in a wheelchair. Another work pictures a woman sitting, head bowed, in a wheelchair, beside an image of the same woman standing, head held high, in a slinky, sexy gown. Artists Landers and Deca opened Independence EDGE Studio last weekend in the same space where the disability-advocacy group Liberty Resources has run an art studio since 2000.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|