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Wheelchair

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NEWS
August 9, 1997 | JIM MacMILLAN/ DAILY NEWS
About 50 people in wheelchairs blocked the driveway at the Greyhound bus terminal in Center City yesterday to protest the company's failure to provide access for the handicapped to its buses. Police made no arrests.
NEWS
July 30, 2002
I have spinal muscular atrophy, which makes me wheelchair-bound. And I see a problem with wheelchair accessibility. First, in the School District of Philadelphia, the majority of the elementary schools seem to be without an elevator. That means students with disabilities have to find a different school to attend. I had to wait at least two months to attend my neighborhood school, Strawberry Mansion Middle/High School in North Philadelphia, in 2000. The school wasn't wheelchair accessible.
NEWS
January 9, 2003 | By Hannah McCullough
On Saturday, I intended to drive an old friend to the recycling center to be crushed. Our reliable companion had not lost its energy or mobility but was bored just sitting in the garage. Our friend, an $8,000 motorized wheelchair, very nearly became an innocent victim of our throwaway society. My mother, a stroke survivor with one leg and one arm, died July 23. The wheelchair had served her well, giving her daily independence and freedom, regularly and reliably, for five years.
NEWS
December 8, 1987 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, Daily News Staff Writer
SEPTA will remove seats from rail cars on its regional line to make room for people in wheelchairs as the result of a lawsuit against the transit authority. A federal judge yesterday ordered SEPTA to make rail cars wheelchair- accessible by March 1, but a SEPTA spokeswoman said the work was already under way. SEPTA agreed to the arrangement as the result of a suit filed in March 1986 by Disabled in Action and others. DIA president Steve Margolis said the agreement means wheelchair-bound people will be able to ride commuter trains "for the first time.
NEWS
April 12, 1989 | BY MARGARET GREENFIELD
Robin Palley's March 23 article about the experience of Jerry Rhoten, a Virginian in Philadelphia for medical treatment, reveals the positive attitudes and heroic achievements of this man and his doctors. However, it also shows a public attitude towards a human being so shocking that it is beyond belief! Every time I ride through Philadelphia, I am distressed at the environmental ugliness of a once-beautiful city. Now I am more than distressed at an equally ugly treatment of a man in the city of "Brotherly Love.
NEWS
April 18, 2009 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A man in a motorized wheelchair was killed and two dozen SEPTA bus passengers were shaken up in a grinding crash yesterday afternoon. SEPTA spokesman Richard Maloney said the crash happened about 4:15 p.m. on Eighth Street just south of Girard Avenue. Maloney said it appeared that the man was crossing Eighth from the west when a westbound 47 bus was turning left onto Eighth from Girard. The crash happened near the intersection, which has a hair salon on the southwest corner and a gas station on the southeast.
NEWS
July 27, 2011 | By Alia Conley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eileen Sabel's protest signs could be seen from all angles. She had a flier taped in front on her lap and three big signs fastened on the other sides of her wheelchair. Sabel, known as "Spitfire," wants wheelchair-accessible taxicabs. Monday night, when a bus she was riding broke down, she had to steer her powered wheelchair home in the rain. "I'm not a villain," said Sabel, 61, who lives in Germantown. "It's not fair. The word is dignity . " About 200 protesters from three groups gathered Tuesday morning outside the Convention Center to demand accessible taxicabs.
NEWS
January 14, 1986 | By Susan Caba, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA is seeking $12 million in damages from a Colorado manufacturing firm that SEPTA says failed to provide properly working wheelchair lifts for 150 buses. In a suit filed in U.S. District Court yesterday, the SEPTA accused the firm of breaching its contract to provide the buses, breaching warranties, negligence and misrepresentation. SEPTA is seeking $2 million in compensatory damages from Neoplan USA, of Lamar, Colo., and $10 million in punitive damages. A spokeswoman for Neoplan said the firm's officials had not seen the court papers and would have no comment on the lawsuit.
NEWS
September 25, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
A WHEELCHAIR-BOUND man allegedly stabbed an acquaintance five times in the leg when the victim refused to buy the man's Xbox early Sunday morning, Upper Darby police said yesterday The victim, 57, remains at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in serious condition, said Michael Chitwood, Upper Darby police superintendent. The same man who is charged in the stabbing, Andrew Hinson, was the subject of a segment on 6ABC this summer when he claimed his wheelchair was stolen from out front of his Upper Darby home.
NEWS
March 8, 1989 | By Scott Brodeur and Catherine Ross, Special to The Inquirer
A Municipal Court judge in Glassboro yesterday dismissed a motor vehicle charge against a woman in a motorized wheelchair who local police said was driving without lights. Judge Jay R. Powell threw out the charge, determining that the wheelchair was not a vehicle and not subject to the restrictions or requirements of a motor vehicle. For Monica Himes, 34, who suffers multiple sclerosis and has lived in Glassboro for seven years, the case marked another fight with borough officials that she has won. "This is an explicit example of how society does not allow the disabled to be visible," said Himes, who has brought several civil rights cases against the borough.
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NEWS
July 7, 2016 | By Robert Moran, STAFF WRITER
A woman was arrested after allegedly spraying Mace at a SEPTA bus driver and a passenger in a wheelchair Tuesday night in the city's Olney section. The incident occurred about 7:45 p.m. when a Route 47 bus was stopped in the 5600 block of North Fifth Street to allow the passenger in the wheelchair to board, said Transit Police Chief Thomas J. Nestel 3rd. The bus driver was assisting the wheelchair rider "when a woman boarded who was very agitated because she felt the driver had passed her by in mid-block," Nestel said.
NEWS
July 3, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
A purse snatcher stole about $600 from a 53-year-old woman in a wheelchair who was doing her laundry in West Philadelphia, police said Friday. About 1:15 p.m. June 24, the male suspect and a female accomplice arrived by car to the laundromat, at 5101 Walnut St., as seen on a surveillance video. After appearing to put money in a laundry machine, the accomplice left the laundromat. The man then snatched the victim's purse and fled back to the car, a light-colored sedan, where the woman was waiting.
BUSINESS
June 23, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
January's big snowstorm had Liam Dougherty feeling trapped in his apartment. A few days after the storm he wanted to meet his fiancée for a movie at a theater on 40th and Walnut Streets, less than a mile from his apartment, but Dougherty has a neuromuscular disorder, Friedreich's ataxia, and the wheels on a scooter he sometimes uses don't handle snow well. He needed a car that could accommodate his disabilities. Finding one for a five-minute drive took two to three hours. In Philadelphia, finding a car for hire, whether it's a cab or an Uber, can be a skyscraper-size hurdle for people with disabilities.
SPORTS
May 13, 2016 | Marcus Hayes, Daily News Columnist
#Prayfordominic FLETCHER COX does. He's been praying for Dominic since March 7, when he sent a Facebook video message: "I hope you feel better, man. We're praying for you. " The message arrived just hours before doctors operated on the Grade III anaplastic astrocytoma in Dominic's brain. It is a rare, recurring, malignant tumor that turned a 7-year-old sharpshooter into the other kid on Lenape Lane with a wheelchair. Dominic Liples' 5-year-old little brother, Ciarlo, was born with spina bifida.
NEWS
May 12, 2016 | By Ronnie Polaneczky
IT GOES WITHOUT saying that if your institution is named for Benjamin Franklin, you shouldn't engage in practices that would make America's founding Everyman puke with revulsion on his buckled shoes. So shame on the Franklin Institute for demanding admissions fees for personal-care attendants who must accompany their disabled clients to the museum. And - mwah! - a big, fat kiss to U.S. District Judge Gerald A. McHugh, who just ruled against the institute, which was sued for its nasty, petty, mean-spirited penny-pinching.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Ryan "Gooch" Nelson is a lucky man. At 30, the bluesy slide guitarist and his band Gooch and the Motion just signed with famed Philadelphia producer Joe Nicolo's new label, Blackbird, for a debut album ( Comin' Home ) that will have its release party at World Cafe Live on Thursday. Sure, Nelson is fortunate to have a singing style and guitar sound that's deeply reminiscent of his inspirations (Tom Waits, Duane Allman), as well as romantic and unique. But he's also a quadriplegic cancer survivor, so the act of, say, watching March Madness basketball with the windows open in his home in Woodstown, N.J., makes him feel just as lucky.
NEWS
December 28, 2015 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
The limp is barely noticeable when she wears sneakers that cushion the injured nerves in her left foot. At poolside, barefoot, it is more obvious. Memories of the dreadful accident on the Georgetown University campus will never disappear entirely. But almost five years after the five-story fall that shattered her body and her hopes of college swimming stardom, Michelle Konkoly still is working to be the best she can be. In September, the Montgomery County woman expects to be in Rio de Janeiro, competing again in swimming, but this time, she will be in the Paralympic Games.
NEWS
July 4, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first of an anticipated 150 wheelchair-accessible taxis was put into service in Philadelphia Thursday, the Philadelphia Parking Authority said. Starting with one now, PPA's goal is to have 61 wheelchair-friendly cabs on the street by the end of this year. The target date for 150 cabs is 2021. The authority started trying sell medallions for wheelchair cabs for $475,000 each last October, but was forced to dramatically cut the price when no buyers emerged amid the uncertainty created by competition from ride-share operators such as Uber and Lyft.
NEWS
July 4, 2015 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Parking Authority on Thursday unveiled the vanguard of a new fleet of wheelchair-accessible taxi cabs coming to the city. PPA plans to put 61 of the cabs in service by the end of 2015. The goal is for 150 to be on the road by 2021. According to the advocacy group Taxis for All Philadelphia, more than 128,800 Philadelphians have an ambulatory disability, but only seven of the 1,599 taxicabs in Philadelphia are wheelchair-accessible. An eighth was added Thursday. The new cab, the product of American Mobility Transportation of Morrisville, Bucks County, resembles a small minivan with a foldout rear ramp to permit access by a wheelchair user.
NEWS
July 3, 2015 | BY ANNIE PALMER, Daily News Staff Writer palmera@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
THE PHILADELPHIA Parking Authority rolled out the first in a fleet of 150 new wheelchair-accessible taxi vans yesterday morning. For those who use wheelchairs, the development was worth the two-hour wait they'd usually endure to hail an accessible cab, said Leah Smith, a volunteer with Taxis For All Philadelphia, which advocates for wheelchair-accessible taxis. The new taxi was introduced at a news conference called yesterday by Taxis For All Philadelphia and the PPA at the PPA's Taxicab and Limo Division in Southwest Philadelphia.
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