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Wheelchair

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NEWS
August 9, 1997 | JIM MacMILLAN/ DAILY NEWS
About 50 people in wheelchairs blocked the driveway at the Greyhound bus terminal in Center City yesterday to protest the company's failure to provide access for the handicapped to its buses. Police made no arrests.
NEWS
July 30, 2002
I have spinal muscular atrophy, which makes me wheelchair-bound. And I see a problem with wheelchair accessibility. First, in the School District of Philadelphia, the majority of the elementary schools seem to be without an elevator. That means students with disabilities have to find a different school to attend. I had to wait at least two months to attend my neighborhood school, Strawberry Mansion Middle/High School in North Philadelphia, in 2000. The school wasn't wheelchair accessible.
NEWS
January 9, 2003 | By Hannah McCullough
On Saturday, I intended to drive an old friend to the recycling center to be crushed. Our reliable companion had not lost its energy or mobility but was bored just sitting in the garage. Our friend, an $8,000 motorized wheelchair, very nearly became an innocent victim of our throwaway society. My mother, a stroke survivor with one leg and one arm, died July 23. The wheelchair had served her well, giving her daily independence and freedom, regularly and reliably, for five years.
NEWS
December 8, 1987 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, Daily News Staff Writer
SEPTA will remove seats from rail cars on its regional line to make room for people in wheelchairs as the result of a lawsuit against the transit authority. A federal judge yesterday ordered SEPTA to make rail cars wheelchair- accessible by March 1, but a SEPTA spokeswoman said the work was already under way. SEPTA agreed to the arrangement as the result of a suit filed in March 1986 by Disabled in Action and others. DIA president Steve Margolis said the agreement means wheelchair-bound people will be able to ride commuter trains "for the first time.
NEWS
April 12, 1989 | BY MARGARET GREENFIELD
Robin Palley's March 23 article about the experience of Jerry Rhoten, a Virginian in Philadelphia for medical treatment, reveals the positive attitudes and heroic achievements of this man and his doctors. However, it also shows a public attitude towards a human being so shocking that it is beyond belief! Every time I ride through Philadelphia, I am distressed at the environmental ugliness of a once-beautiful city. Now I am more than distressed at an equally ugly treatment of a man in the city of "Brotherly Love.
NEWS
April 18, 2009 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A man in a motorized wheelchair was killed and two dozen SEPTA bus passengers were shaken up in a grinding crash yesterday afternoon. SEPTA spokesman Richard Maloney said the crash happened about 4:15 p.m. on Eighth Street just south of Girard Avenue. Maloney said it appeared that the man was crossing Eighth from the west when a westbound 47 bus was turning left onto Eighth from Girard. The crash happened near the intersection, which has a hair salon on the southwest corner and a gas station on the southeast.
NEWS
September 25, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
A WHEELCHAIR-BOUND man allegedly stabbed an acquaintance five times in the leg when the victim refused to buy the man's Xbox early Sunday morning, Upper Darby police said yesterday The victim, 57, remains at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in serious condition, said Michael Chitwood, Upper Darby police superintendent. The same man who is charged in the stabbing, Andrew Hinson, was the subject of a segment on 6ABC this summer when he claimed his wheelchair was stolen from out front of his Upper Darby home.
NEWS
July 27, 2011 | By Alia Conley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eileen Sabel's protest signs could be seen from all angles. She had a flier taped in front on her lap and three big signs fastened on the other sides of her wheelchair. Sabel, known as "Spitfire," wants wheelchair-accessible taxicabs. Monday night, when a bus she was riding broke down, she had to steer her powered wheelchair home in the rain. "I'm not a villain," said Sabel, 61, who lives in Germantown. "It's not fair. The word is dignity . " About 200 protesters from three groups gathered Tuesday morning outside the Convention Center to demand accessible taxicabs.
NEWS
January 14, 1986 | By Susan Caba, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA is seeking $12 million in damages from a Colorado manufacturing firm that SEPTA says failed to provide properly working wheelchair lifts for 150 buses. In a suit filed in U.S. District Court yesterday, the SEPTA accused the firm of breaching its contract to provide the buses, breaching warranties, negligence and misrepresentation. SEPTA is seeking $2 million in compensatory damages from Neoplan USA, of Lamar, Colo., and $10 million in punitive damages. A spokeswoman for Neoplan said the firm's officials had not seen the court papers and would have no comment on the lawsuit.
NEWS
March 8, 1989 | By Scott Brodeur and Catherine Ross, Special to The Inquirer
A Municipal Court judge in Glassboro yesterday dismissed a motor vehicle charge against a woman in a motorized wheelchair who local police said was driving without lights. Judge Jay R. Powell threw out the charge, determining that the wheelchair was not a vehicle and not subject to the restrictions or requirements of a motor vehicle. For Monica Himes, 34, who suffers multiple sclerosis and has lived in Glassboro for seven years, the case marked another fight with borough officials that she has won. "This is an explicit example of how society does not allow the disabled to be visible," said Himes, who has brought several civil rights cases against the borough.
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NEWS
June 15, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia could have dozens of wheelchair-accessible taxicabs by the end of the year, thanks in part to a federal court order signed Friday. The order was a compromise between the Philadelphia Parking Authority and Disabled in Action of Pennsylvania, and was reached after a three-year court battle. The settlement is contingent on the Pennsylvania Independent Regulatory Review Commission's approving necessary regulations next week. In the five-page decision, U.S. District Judge C. Darnell Jones III states that the Parking Authority will have to issue 150 taxicab medallions in the next 10 years exclusively for wheelchair-accessible vehicles.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
James W. Staerk, 54, a longtime prosecutor for the Montgomery County District Attorney's Office, died of spinal muscular atrophy on Thursday, April 17, in Bluffton, S.C. Mr. Staerk grew up in Abington, where he lived until retiring to South Carolina in January. He worked for 27 years as an assistant district attorney in Montgomery County, where he led the forfeiture division and seized planes, cars, houses and other assets. Diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy at age 4, Mr. Staerk was a quadriplegic and spent his life in a wheelchair, but "figured out how to do almost everything," said his sister Kathleen Allison-Earle.
NEWS
February 10, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
SOME OF THE artwork in the basement art studio that Vicki Landers and Ray Deca run in Center City brims with the perspective of the disabled artists who created it. On one canvas, "PISS on pity" is the slogan beside the symbol of a person in a wheelchair. Another work pictures a woman sitting, head bowed, in a wheelchair, beside an image of the same woman standing, head held high, in a slinky, sexy gown. Artists Landers and Deca opened Independence EDGE Studio last weekend in the same space where the disability-advocacy group Liberty Resources has run an art studio since 2000.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
Lauren DeBruicker knows some people look at her and see her wheelchair first. They see the metal seat as a negative, something holding her back. She's wheelchair-bound , as the cliche goes. That's ridiculous, she said. " Bound . Like I've been tied to it by pirates or something," DeBruicker scoffed during a recent interview in her office at the city law firm of Duane Morris L.L.P., where she is a partner. More than 20 years after she lost the use of her legs and some of the movement in her arms, DeBruicker, 41, has a full, rewarding life and she wants other people to know it. She'll spread that message as an ambassador for Inglis, the nonprofit that helps people with disabilities live independently while providing 24-hour care to those who desire it. "There's a perception that people with disabilities don't work, don't play, don't have any fun," she said.
NEWS
January 15, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
THERE'S A SPECIAL place in hell for the people whose bureaucratic BS put Meredith Gill in the middle of busy John F. Kennedy Boulevard in a broken wheelchair. Gill, a quadriplegic, was crossing the boulevard earlier this month when her motorized wheelchair suddenly stopped. Luckily she had the green light, so she was able to lurch it back to life long enough to get to the sidewalk. By the time she got to her job at Hahnemann University Hospital, with her chair jolting to a stop every few feet, Gill was in tears.
NEWS
December 31, 2013 | BY DANA DIFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
FOR AS LONG as she can remember, 10-year-old Melissa Shang has battled Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, a form of muscular dystrophy. The incurable genetic disease damages nerves - causing debilitating muscle weakness and numbness - and requires Melissa to use a wheelchair or walker to get around. When she was 7, Melissa fell in love with American Girl dolls, the pricey must-have toy of young girls from coast to coast and beyond. She cajoles her college-student sister to play dolls with her on trips home.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
*  SUPER FUN NIGHT . 9:30 tonight, 6ABC. *  IRONSIDE . 10 tonight, NBC10. *  THE BRIDGE . 10 tonight, FX.me "HOUSE" MEETS "Law & Order" in the new "Ironside," which may be the least PC show NBC could have made about an African-American man in a wheelchair. And not just because the actor playing New York police Detective Robert Ironside, Blair Underwood, doesn't need that wheelchair off the set. Some actors who do have objected to seeing an opportunity once again go to the able-bodied.
NEWS
September 25, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
A WHEELCHAIR-BOUND man allegedly stabbed an acquaintance five times in the leg when the victim refused to buy the man's Xbox early Sunday morning, Upper Darby police said yesterday The victim, 57, remains at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in serious condition, said Michael Chitwood, Upper Darby police superintendent. The same man who is charged in the stabbing, Andrew Hinson, was the subject of a segment on 6ABC this summer when he claimed his wheelchair was stolen from out front of his Upper Darby home.
NEWS
August 25, 2013 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ed Galing cannot get enough. Enough attention. Enough praise. Enough love. Enough life. And if he hasn't had his fill at 96, he is unlikely to ever feel completely sated. "I love publicity," Galing said, with characteristic candor. "I'm famous!" In June, the mayor of Hatboro gave Galing a lifetime achievement award for his more than 16 years as poet laureate of the Montgomery County town. "It's like being in the Kennedy Center, and the president puts a medal around their neck," Galing said in his gravelly voice.
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