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Whistle Blower

BUSINESS
August 26, 2012 | By Andrew Tangel, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - They've called from pay phones. They've had furtive meetings at hotels and even a church. On internal government documents, they go by such code names as Mr. X. For the last year, whistle-blowers deep inside corporate America have been dishing dirt on their employers under a Securities and Exchange Commission program that could give them a cut of multimillion-dollar penalties won by financial regulators. A new bounty program has been an intel boon to the securities industry regulator, which has struggled to redeem itself after failing to stop Bernard Madoff's epic Ponzi scheme and rein in Wall Street before the 2008 financial crisis.
NEWS
August 3, 2012
NEWARK, N.J. - Jurors have awarded more than $1 million to a New Jersey state trooper who filed a whistle-blower lawsuit. The lawyer for retired Detective Sgt. 1st Class Brian Royster says that jurors in Essex County on Wednesday found that the State Police and Superintendent Col. Rick Fuentes violated the act, which aims to protect those who speak out. Royster, who is black, filed suit in 2005. The 48-year-old claimed that cases pending with the Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action unit were stalled without reason and troopers accused of misconduct had been allowed to retire instead of being disciplined.
NEWS
June 29, 2012 | By Matt Katz and Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Former state Attorney General Paula Dow, nominated to a judgeship in Burlington County, will face questions over a politically charged whistle-blower lawsuit at her confirmation hearing Thursday. The suit alleges that Dow dropped a corruption indictment against public officials because those accused had ties to Gov. Christie. The lead prosecutor on the case was then fired by a Dow deputy. Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Nicholas Scutari (D., Union), who will preside over Thursday's hearing, called allegations in the whistle-blower suit "explosive.
NEWS
June 15, 2012 | By WIlliam Bender, Daily News Staff Writer
OFFICER PAUL ZENAK thinks he's been asking too many questions. That's the only way he can make sense of it. Why else did Zenak — a decorated 21-year Philadelphia Police veteran and former Officer of the Year in his district — go from being what a sergeant described as an "outstanding" and "highly recommended" director of the Wissinoming Police Athletic League center to a cop with a tarnished reputation and two bizarre reprimands in his...
NEWS
May 28, 2012 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
At 3:30 p.m., Joseph D. Carruth jumps up from the couch at his Townsend, Del., home and heads to the garage. He speeds off on a Razor scooter with another scooter in tow. Just down the block, 8-year-old Brianna Carruth hops out of a yellow school bus. "Daddy!" the Brick Mills Elementary third grader in pink pants and curly pigtails yells as he greets her with open arms. The pair then race back home. "I win," Brianna says, as she heads inside for a snack. The after-school race has been a routine since Brianna started school.
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By Claudia Vargas, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A former Camden principal who last year received an $860,000 settlement from the school district must be reinstated in the district by July 2013, an arbitrator has ruled. In a whistle-blower lawsuit filed in Superior Court in 2007, Joseph Carruth said he was fired for publicly alleging that Camden school officials had pressured him to change test scores at Dr. Charles E. Brimm Medical Arts High School in 2005. The school district settled Carruth's civil lawsuit in November. Carruth, who earned $107,000 a year at the magnet school where he had been principal for two years, was terminated in 2006 on a recommendation by then-Superintendent Annette D. Knox.
NEWS
March 6, 2012
FRANCIS X. Dougherty, who was fired as the school district's deputy chief business officer after an investigation into who leaked information about the awarding of a $7.5-million no-bid surveillance-camera project, has filed a federal lawsuit contending that he was fired for being a whistle-blower. The suit, filed in U.S. District Court, contends that he was dumped for telling the FBI, state officials and the Inquirer about his allegation that former Schools Superintendent Arlene Ackerman improperly steered the contract to a minority firm in 2010, bypassing Security & Data Technologies Inc., which already had begun work on the project to install cameras in 19 city schools deemed dangerous.
NEWS
February 1, 2012 | By Robert Burns, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Federal investigators have concluded that Air Force officials at the military mortuary in Dover, Del., illegally punished four civilian workers for blowing the whistle on the mishandling of body parts of dead troops. The Office of Special Counsel said in a report released Tuesday that they had recommended the Air Force discipline the three officials who allegedly retaliated against the whistle-blowers. The three were not identified by name, but the report said one was an active-duty military member and the others were civilians.
NEWS
December 22, 2011 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
At least four priests, described by lawyers as "whistle-blowers," have come forward hoping to aid in the prosecution of current and former clergy members accused in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia sex-abuse scandal. However, an archdiocesan policy requiring them to notify church lawyers before talking to law enforcement could stifle the testimony they are willing to give, city prosecutors told a judge Wednesday. "They're muffling us," said Assistant District Attorney Patrick Blessington, paraphrasing the response he said he had heard from at least one priest.
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