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Whistle Blower

NEWS
June 15, 2012 | By WIlliam Bender, Daily News Staff Writer
OFFICER PAUL ZENAK thinks he's been asking too many questions. That's the only way he can make sense of it. Why else did Zenak — a decorated 21-year Philadelphia Police veteran and former Officer of the Year in his district — go from being what a sergeant described as an "outstanding" and "highly recommended" director of the Wissinoming Police Athletic League center to a cop with a tarnished reputation and two bizarre reprimands in his...
NEWS
May 28, 2012 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
At 3:30 p.m., Joseph D. Carruth jumps up from the couch at his Townsend, Del., home and heads to the garage. He speeds off on a Razor scooter with another scooter in tow. Just down the block, 8-year-old Brianna Carruth hops out of a yellow school bus. "Daddy!" the Brick Mills Elementary third grader in pink pants and curly pigtails yells as he greets her with open arms. The pair then race back home. "I win," Brianna says, as she heads inside for a snack. The after-school race has been a routine since Brianna started school.
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By Claudia Vargas, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A former Camden principal who last year received an $860,000 settlement from the school district must be reinstated in the district by July 2013, an arbitrator has ruled. In a whistle-blower lawsuit filed in Superior Court in 2007, Joseph Carruth said he was fired for publicly alleging that Camden school officials had pressured him to change test scores at Dr. Charles E. Brimm Medical Arts High School in 2005. The school district settled Carruth's civil lawsuit in November. Carruth, who earned $107,000 a year at the magnet school where he had been principal for two years, was terminated in 2006 on a recommendation by then-Superintendent Annette D. Knox.
NEWS
March 6, 2012
FRANCIS X. Dougherty, who was fired as the school district's deputy chief business officer after an investigation into who leaked information about the awarding of a $7.5-million no-bid surveillance-camera project, has filed a federal lawsuit contending that he was fired for being a whistle-blower. The suit, filed in U.S. District Court, contends that he was dumped for telling the FBI, state officials and the Inquirer about his allegation that former Schools Superintendent Arlene Ackerman improperly steered the contract to a minority firm in 2010, bypassing Security & Data Technologies Inc., which already had begun work on the project to install cameras in 19 city schools deemed dangerous.
NEWS
February 1, 2012 | By Robert Burns, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Federal investigators have concluded that Air Force officials at the military mortuary in Dover, Del., illegally punished four civilian workers for blowing the whistle on the mishandling of body parts of dead troops. The Office of Special Counsel said in a report released Tuesday that they had recommended the Air Force discipline the three officials who allegedly retaliated against the whistle-blowers. The three were not identified by name, but the report said one was an active-duty military member and the others were civilians.
NEWS
December 22, 2011 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
At least four priests, described by lawyers as "whistle-blowers," have come forward hoping to aid in the prosecution of current and former clergy members accused in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia sex-abuse scandal. However, an archdiocesan policy requiring them to notify church lawyers before talking to law enforcement could stifle the testimony they are willing to give, city prosecutors told a judge Wednesday. "They're muffling us," said Assistant District Attorney Patrick Blessington, paraphrasing the response he said he had heard from at least one priest.
NEWS
December 16, 2011 | By Brian Bennett, Tribune Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - When U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning walks into a military court Friday in Maryland, his many supporters and detractors will get their first glimpse of the soft-spoken Oklahoma native since his arrest in Iraq 19 months ago. Manning is the only person charged with unauthorized release of more than half a million classified U.S. military reports and diplomatic cables from around the globe, as well as a 2007 video of a deadly U.S. helicopter attack...
NEWS
October 26, 2011
An Oklahoma man was sentenced to two years in prison for lying to Philadelphia-based antitrust officials about a price-fixing scheme by a former employer and other auto filter manufacturers, Zane David Memeger, the United States Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, said today. Two years after Champion Laboratories Inc. fired him in 2006 for falsifying travel vouchers, William G. Burch, 52, of Tulsa, filed a whistle-blower lawsuit against Champion and five competitors, alleging that they had conspired to fix prices.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2011 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former executive with a pharmaceutical distributors trade group alleges in a federal whistle-blower lawsuit that 13 drug companies manipulated price data to reduce the amounts they owed federal and state governments for the taxpayer-funded Medicaid program that serves the poor. The number of companies named as defendants has fluctuated. The original filing accused 30 companies. The fourth and most recent version of the complaint, unsealed this week in Philadelphia, accused 13 companies: Allergan, Amgen, AstraZeneca, Biogen, Bradley, Cephalon, Eisai, Genzyme, Mallinckrodt, NovoNordisk, Reliant, Sunovion, and Upsher-Smith.
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