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Whistle Blower

NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Cooper Health System in Camden has agreed to pay $12.6 million to settle a whistle-blower lawsuit alleging that it made improper payments to doctors in an effort to build its cardiology business, the U.S. attorney for the District of New Jersey said Thursday. From October 2004 through 2010, local doctors were paid $18,000 to attend four meetings of the Cooper Heart Institute Advisory Board in any given year under "consulting" and "compensation" agreements, in possible violation of antikickback laws, state and federal law enforcement officials contended.
NEWS
January 23, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia School District says in a court filing that former Superintendent Arlene C. Ackerman did not steer a no-bid contract for surveillance cameras to a small minority firm, which contradicted a report the School Reform Commission recently adopted that said she had. In a response filed Friday to a whistle-blower's suit in federal court, the district denied that Ackerman acted improperly and alleged that the whistle blower - Francis X....
SPORTS
January 19, 2013 | By Liz Clarke, Washington Post
Former teammate Floyd Landis has targeted not only Lance Armstrong but also three of Armstrong's closest associates - his longtime manager, his closest friend, and his deep-pocketed benefactor - in the whistle-blower lawsuit that has been under judicial seal for more than 21/2 years. And Landis reserves the right to add others to the qui tam suit, which claims that Armstrong and his associates defrauded the federal government by accepting roughly $30 million in sponsorship money to bankroll a U.S. Postal Service Pro Cycling team that was fueled by performance-enhancing drugs.
NEWS
January 16, 2013 | By Jeremy Roebuck, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania State University denied defamation and wrongful-termination claims Tuesday that were lodged by a former assistant football coach who testified against Jerry Sandusky. In filings in Centre County Court, the university asked a judge to throw out a state whistle-blower lawsuit brought by Mike McQueary, arguing that any damage he endured as a result of his role as a prosecution witness was not caused by Penn State. So far, McQueary has failed to provide any evidence suggesting that Penn State officials publicly questioned his character, university counsel Nancy Conrad wrote.
NEWS
January 16, 2013 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania State University denied defamation and wrongful-termination claims Tuesday that were lodged by a former assistant football coach who testified against Jerry Sandusky. In filings in Centre County Court, the university asked a judge to throw out a state whistle-blower lawsuit brought by Mike McQueary, arguing that any damage he endured as a result of his role as a prosecution witness was not caused by Penn State. So far, McQueary has failed to provide any evidence suggesting that Penn State officials publicly questioned his character, university counsel Nancy Conrad wrote.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2012 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Texas, Allen Jones determined that state employees were getting kickbacks from pharmaceutical companies, and his efforts resulted in his being named Whistle-blower of the Year and awarded about $20 million of the state's $158 million settlement. In Pennsylvania, where Jones was a commonwealth-paid investigator, he and his information were dismissed - twice, almost a decade apart. Jones had discovered malfeasance that was similar in both states, with the drug companies wanting state officials to help push higher-priced antipsychotic drugs to foster children, among other wards of the state, through taxpayer-funded Medicaid programs.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2012 | By Alan Fram, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - In 2010, the government threw Bradley Birkenfeld in prison for helping a former client at UBS AG hide his wealth from the Internal Revenue Service. Now, as part of the same case, the IRS has awarded the former banker $104 million for helping expose the widespread tax-evasion scheme by the Swiss banking behemoth. The dizzyingly abrupt turnabout in Birkenfeld's life leaves him with the largest government whistle-blower award ever to an individual, said Stephen M. Kohn, one of Birkenfeld's attorneys and executive director of the National Whistleblowers Center.
NEWS
September 11, 2012 | By John P. Martin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To hear his lawyer tell it, Rocco Martinez fancied himself a whistle-blower, a warrior against a scourge of so many Philadelphians: the heartless Parking Authority officer scribbling an undeserved ticket. But when Martinez secretly videotaped an officer allegedly offering to fix tickets last year, then threatened to make it public if the authority bosses didn't pay him, investigators saw something else. Extortion. On Monday, Martinez pleaded guilty to extorting $500 from Parking Authority Director Vince Fenerty.
BUSINESS
August 26, 2012 | By Andrew Tangel, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - They've called from pay phones. They've had furtive meetings at hotels and even a church. On internal government documents, they go by such code names as Mr. X. For the last year, whistle-blowers deep inside corporate America have been dishing dirt on their employers under a Securities and Exchange Commission program that could give them a cut of multimillion-dollar penalties won by financial regulators. A new bounty program has been an intel boon to the securities industry regulator, which has struggled to redeem itself after failing to stop Bernard Madoff's epic Ponzi scheme and rein in Wall Street before the 2008 financial crisis.
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