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White Bread

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NEWS
February 5, 1988 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
Despite what you may hear, the amazing thing about "She's Having a Baby" is not that John Hughes has finally made a movie about grownups. First of all, he's already done that, in "Mr. Mom" and "Planes, Trains and Automobiles. " Second of all, the film's main characters, newlyweds Jake Briggs (Kevin Bacon) and Kristy Bainbridge (Elizabeth McGovern), though nominally adult, are teen- agers in their hearts. The chief suspense in the movie is whether they will eventually grow up. (They do.)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2002 | By LAUREN McCUTCHEON For the Daily News
Welcome home your little ghosts and goblins with this tasty Halloween sandwich. The folks at London Grill on Fairmount Avenue altered their recipe for their famous fish and chips - skipping the beer in the batter and adding festively ghoulish touches - to create a kid-friendly fish-witch, served on toasted white bread with a side of bloody tartar sauce. After all, you can't expect trick-or-treaters to live on candy alone. THE HALLOWEEN FISH-WITCH SANDWICH For the batter: 2 cups flour 2 teaspoons salt 2 eggs 1/2 cup club soda 1/2 cup water Mix flour and salt in bowl.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2003 | By LAUREN MCCUTCHEON For the Daily News
What happens when three Irish-American pals from Mayfair - including chef Kevin O'Kane, who did time at the swanky Happy Rooster and the posh Fountain - open up a sandwich shop on Main Street in Manayunk called Mixx on Main (4307 Main St.)? Some serious sandwiches, that's what. One of the most seriously flavorful is the Ham Bone, a hot club named after O'Kane's old boss, chef Martin Hamman of the Four Seasons. THE HAM BONE 2 tablespoons butter 3 slices white bread 5 slices American cheese 3 ounces thinly sliced turkey 3 ounces thinly sliced ham Black pepper Kosher salt 6 strips crispy bacon 1/2 avocado, deseeded and julienned In large saute pan, melt one tablespoon butter, add white bread, and top with cheese.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2002 | By LAUREN McCUTCHEON For the Daily News
Not everyone is lucky enough to be going back to school this week. Watching the little ones with their SpongeBob backpacks and No. 2 pencils get on yellow buses, we adults pine for the simple pleasures of the new school year. One of my fondest back-to-school memories: opening my Ziggy lunch box to find a sandwich, an apple, juice, a cookie - and a note from Mom written on a napkin. Once in a while, my mother would pack an extra-special treat: a half sandwich from our neighborhood deli.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2012 | Freelance
What's cooking? A classic sandwich selection — from turkey and cheese on white bread to a hearty Philly cheesesteak. A line can be found at Gus's for breakfast, too. They're family: Gus Katseftis and his wife, Joan, along with various family members, fed employees of the Daily News, Inquirer and philly.com for 21 years from Gus' spot next to the company's former headquarters at Broad and Callowhill streets. Convenient, yes, but what kept people coming back was the menu. Satisfied customers: "It's old-school," said Craig LaBan, Inquirer food critic and frequent Gus' customer.
NEWS
April 23, 2012 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
For a few hours Sunday, they agreed to miss some of the Flyers playoff game and held off on those "Honey-do" lists of household chores. Instead, the South Jersey Men's Club made nearly 400 peanut-butter-and-jelly sandwiches for a group of eaters they'll never meet - men and women wanted on outstanding bench warrants for nonviolent offenses. The sandwiches were just one slice of the rewards for hundreds of fugitives expected to turn themselves in over the next few days at an Atlantic City church as part of New Jersey's Fugitive Safe Surrender program.
NEWS
April 22, 2012 | By Darran Simon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For a few hours Sunday, they agreed to miss the Flyers playoff game and held off on those "Honey-do" lists of household chores. Instead, the South Jersey Men's Club made nearly 400 peanut butter-and-jelly sandwiches for a group of eaters they'll never meet - men and women with outstanding bench warrants for alleged nonviolent offenses. The sandwiches were just one slice of the rewards for hundreds of wanted people expected to turn themselves in over the next few days at an Atlantic City church as part of New Jersey's Fugitive Safe Surrender program.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2001 | By Thomas J. Brady INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fearing that a Canadian food giant might get too big a slice of the Philadelphia bread market, the U.S. Justice Department ordered the company yesterday to give up its right to sell Sunbeam products in the area. The department said the Toronto company, George Weston Ltd., could buy Bestfoods Baking Co. only if it disposed of Bestfoods' licenses to market Sunbeam locally. The $1.77 billion acquisition from Unilever NV was completed later yesterday. Bestfoods holds the licenses to produce and sell Sunbeam products in Philadelphia, South Jersey and parts of upstate New York.
NEWS
August 23, 1991 | by Kathy Sheehan, Daily News Staff Writer
It was daring: taking my 13-year-old godson to Hong's Chinese Restaurant off South Street when his restaurant experience was minimal and the last time he came to visit he would eat only canned Spaghetti-O's and sandwiches on white bread. He still insists on white bread, but was willing and eager on a recent visit to order off a restaurant menu listing foods he had never heard of before. Hong's is not your typical Chinese restaurant. It does not offer chicken fingers on pu-pu platters.
FOOD
February 14, 1990 | By Bonnie Tandy Leblang and Carolyn Wyman, Special to the Daily News
WONDER LIGHT OATMEAL BREAD. $1.13 to $1.87 per 16-oz. loaf. CAROLYN: The only Wonder here is how this company was able to get away with calling this new bread oatmeal when it tastes so much like white - and not the most moist and flavorful white bread either. Better to eat half a sandwich made out of real oatmeal bread or a whole one made from those tiny, paper-thin sliced diet loafs by Arnold or Pepperidge Farm than a whole one made with these starchy slabs. BONNIE: I can hardly believe it's you, Carolyn.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2012 | Freelance
What's cooking? A classic sandwich selection — from turkey and cheese on white bread to a hearty Philly cheesesteak. A line can be found at Gus's for breakfast, too. They're family: Gus Katseftis and his wife, Joan, along with various family members, fed employees of the Daily News, Inquirer and philly.com for 21 years from Gus' spot next to the company's former headquarters at Broad and Callowhill streets. Convenient, yes, but what kept people coming back was the menu. Satisfied customers: "It's old-school," said Craig LaBan, Inquirer food critic and frequent Gus' customer.
NEWS
April 23, 2012 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
For a few hours Sunday, they agreed to miss some of the Flyers playoff game and held off on those "Honey-do" lists of household chores. Instead, the South Jersey Men's Club made nearly 400 peanut-butter-and-jelly sandwiches for a group of eaters they'll never meet - men and women wanted on outstanding bench warrants for nonviolent offenses. The sandwiches were just one slice of the rewards for hundreds of fugitives expected to turn themselves in over the next few days at an Atlantic City church as part of New Jersey's Fugitive Safe Surrender program.
NEWS
April 22, 2012 | By Darran Simon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For a few hours Sunday, they agreed to miss the Flyers playoff game and held off on those "Honey-do" lists of household chores. Instead, the South Jersey Men's Club made nearly 400 peanut butter-and-jelly sandwiches for a group of eaters they'll never meet - men and women with outstanding bench warrants for alleged nonviolent offenses. The sandwiches were just one slice of the rewards for hundreds of wanted people expected to turn themselves in over the next few days at an Atlantic City church as part of New Jersey's Fugitive Safe Surrender program.
SPORTS
March 27, 2012 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Sports Writer
THE NCAA Final Four consists of three teams seeded No. 2 or higher, and one seeded fourth. That said, you would think that among the more than five million brackets entered in CBSSports.com's tournament pool, a significant percentage would have a perfect Final Four. Think again. Apparently, a lot people go with the No. 1 seeds. According to the website, only 17,979 brackets - out of 5,136,592 - penciled in Ohio State (No. 2, East), Kansas (No. 2, Midwest), Kentucky (No. 1, South)
NEWS
March 26, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: For the last six months, I've had two attacks of small bowel obstruction caused by adhesions. I've been told that there's nothing I can do to prevent future attacks. Can you elaborate on this subject? Answer: Unfortunately, there's not much you can do to prevent the recurrence of those painful, pesky, periodic obstructions to one or more loops of bowel that make up the small intestine. Adhesions are areas of tough, fibrous scar tissue that develop in the abdomen as a result of prior surgery like an appendectomy or gall bladder removal.
NEWS
November 2, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
MASON, TEXAS - On a YouTube clip that has gone viral, Texas handgun instructor Crockett Keller defiantly tells Muslims and non-Christian Arabs he won't teach them how to handle a firearm. State officials see the ad as possible discrimination and may revoke his instructor license. Tens of thousands of YouTube viewers have watched the $175 ad for Keller's business in the small community of Mason that has won him a handful of admirers but that embarrassed locals say misrepresents their community.
TRAVEL
August 14, 2011 | By Bob Downing, AKRON BEACON JOURNAL
LINESVILLE, Pa. - Up close, a carp is pretty ugly. Fifty carp are really ugly. Hundreds of wall-to-wall carp with mouths agape are an unforgettable and very creepy sight. At Pymatuning Reservoir on the Ohio-Pennsylvania border, feeding the carp stale bread is a strangely compelling sight that draws hundreds of tourists daily. It's a feeding frenzy, a fishy mosh pit that never really ends. The fish create a grotesque, roiling scrum as they thrash ravenously after bread thrown into the water at the Pymatuning spillway, south of Linesville in northwest Pennsylvania's Pymatuning State Park.
NEWS
August 16, 2009 | By Gerald Eskenazi FOR THE INQUIRER
There are things we take for granted in this part of the country: To me, the bagel is first and foremost. It defines the East as significantly as a Philly cheesesteak. Yet, there I was, sailing along the Nile on a fancy cruise at breakfast time. I looked in the bread basket, and there they were: bagels. On the Nile? I knew they couldn't be good. And they weren't. They were white bread made round. I've been on a bagel quest ever since. My goal is to have a bagel in every foreign city I visit.
SPORTS
April 27, 2009 | By Kate Fagan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One couldn't help but wonder if this was the make that would stop the misses. After hitting the game-winning three-pointer, after delivering his Orlando Magic an 84-81 victory over the 76ers last night at the Wachovia Center, forward Hedo Turkoglu walked back to his bench, popping his jersey from his chest, raising the embroidered white letters of "Orlando" as if to say, "We're back. " Are they? Could Turkoglu's door-slamming, series-tying trey ignite an Orlando offense that, to this point, has appeared as ordinary as white bread?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2009
Here are several recipes that approach the traditional Easter meal from a slightly different direction. SCALOPPINI OF PORK LOIN STUFFED WITH GRANNY SMITH APPLES AND CHESTNUTS 1 pound pork loin, sliced 2 Granny Smith apples 1 shallot 1 cup peeled, cooked chestnuts 2 slices white bread 1/2 cup butter 1 sprig rosemary 2 leaves sage 1/4 cup heavy cream 1 egg 1 cup rich veal demi-glace Amaretto ...
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