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White Collar Crime

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NEWS
February 27, 1986 | By Howard Manly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Raymond Lazinski was antsy. Forty-five days had passed, and he was still waiting for $2,000 owed to his small engineering and electronics firm in Glenside. Everything about the sale had appeared routine at first. Lazinski had checked credit references and had agreed to sell a personal home computer system to a man named William Wilson. Lazinski, president of Wyncote Instrumentation Co. Inc., said that he had installed the system at Wilson's office and that Wilson had promised to pay the bill within 45 days.
NEWS
April 24, 1989 | By JEFF GREENFIELD
Last week Washington put the finishing details on a plan to rescue America's battered savings and loan structure, at a cost to the taxpayers that will exceed $100 billion. By some estimates, most of that cost stems from unethical or flatly illegal behavior on the part of S&L executives all across the country. At roughly the same time, in New York City, a 28-year-old female investment banker was found near death in Central Park. A "wolf pack" of six thugs, between the ages of 13 and 17, had set upon her while she was jogging, and brutally raped and beat her. We know two things about these two stories: In a "cosmic" sense, the story of the S&Ls is much more important, much more consequential and will cause much more suffering - in the form of lost savings, higher costs and a weakening of America's underlying financial health.
NEWS
July 9, 2002 | By U.S. Sens. Joseph R. Biden Jr. and Orrin G. Hatch
One can hardly watch the nightly news or pick up a newspaper without reading new allegations of financial fraud. News outlets are littered with story after story, detailing investment scams that result in lost pension funds. Millions of Americans are left wondering who will protect their life savings, and how CEOs and CFOs can raid pensions and not be held criminally accountable. Yet, historically, we have always held white-collar criminals to a different, lower standard. With most crimes, we pass laws that serve to deter criminal behavior, to forewarn potential wrongdoers that we will not abide assaults on individuals or society.
NEWS
December 7, 1986
In response to the Nov. 23 Inquirer Magazine article "How the FBI nailed Billy Pflaumer," it seems to me that the FBI made a trade: one murderer, Frank Jock, for Billy Pflaumer, who committed a white-collar crime. It seems to me, a long-time employee of one of Mr. Pflaumer's businesses, that the FBI and Ron Cole, the prosecuter, had a personal dislike for Mr. Pflaumer and that they went to the extreme to satisfy their ego. Bernice Lewis Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2012 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
The lake was freezing. The bunks were rustic. The "amenities" included a community bathroom a hefty walk from those bunks. The wake-up call was the shrill blast of a bugle. But Camp Kennebec in North Belgrade, Maine, was a haven for generations of boys - many from Philly - who had a passionate attachment to a place where the word competition is often the first mentioned when reminiscing. Last month, 14 of those "boys," now 55-year-old men, got together for a long weekend reunion in Garrison, N.Y., of a camp that doesn't exist anymore - it closed in 1991 after 84 years as a secular Jewish camp, and the name now belongs to two other camps at the site.
NEWS
April 15, 2004 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With strongly worded commentary but no explanation, a Chester County Court judge yesterday reduced the sentence he gave last month to a "calculating con artist" who swindled 23 victims out of almost $2 million. Instead of 10 to 20 years in prison, Frank Thomas Fiascki, 48, of East Goshen Township, will serve eight to 16 years, according to an order signed by Chester County Court President Judge Howard F. Riley Jr. The change came in response to a routine motion for reconsideration filed on March 19 by Assistant Public Defender Joseph W. Dobson, Fiascki's attorney.
NEWS
July 17, 1986
In an era when the Pentagon shovels out millions for things like $600 toilet seats, U.S. Attorney Edward S.G. Dennis Jr. knows how to put a stop to it. On Tuesday he nailed another outfit specializing in grand theft from taxpayers via the Pentagon - a subsidiary of Litton Industries Inc. called Clifton Precision, Special Devices Division, operating out of Springfield, Delaware County. Mr. Dennis announced that Litton had pleaded guilty to all charges on a 321-count indictment spelling out how its Clifton Precision employees systematically stole $6.3 million between 1975 and 1984 by routinely inflating cost estimates on products it sold the Pentagon.
NEWS
November 24, 2012
Albert Kleiner, 51, a Philadelphia native who became a prosecutor in Arizona, died Sunday, Nov. 4, of melanoma at a hospice in Tucson. For the last nine years, Mr. Kleiner was an assistant attorney general in the Tucson office of the U.S. Justice Department, where he focused on white-collar crime. "Because he was principled and a person of integrity, he was constantly looking for an occupation where he could make a difference," said his brother, Michael. "He was adept at whatever he tried.
NEWS
September 26, 2006 | By RICHARD LAVINTHAL
AKEY TO distinguishing the severity of a crime is knowing how "high" the criminal was at the time. If the offense was committed by someone high up the corporate ladder, or if the crime scene is a corporate boardroom on a high floor of a skyscraper, you've got your more socially acceptable so-called "white-collar crime. " Nasty street criminals don't sport white collars. Nice men and women breaking the law from executive suites and boardrooms usually wear business suits. And their crimes are "carried out," never "committed.
NEWS
January 13, 1994 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Charles J. Taggart, 68, of Clifton Heights, a former Philadelphia policeman and federal investigator known for his skill in fighting white-collar crime and for his "big heart," died Sunday at Lankenau Hospital. "He was like a leader in the office, teaching new agents and giving them the training they needed to investigate white-collar crime," said George Hallett, regional inspector general with the General Services Administration. "He was respected throughout the country because of his knowledge of white-collar crime.
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NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he abruptly resigned from the state House last month, Joe Hackett said he was returning to an $85,290-a-year job with the Delaware County District Attorney's Office after a five-year leave of absence. However, in response to an Inquirer request, the county's open-record office said Tuesday that it had no record that Hackett applied for an extended leave beyond the one granted for his first two years in office under the labor contract between the Fraternal Order of Police and the county.
NEWS
July 20, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
A study by two Philadelphia researchers has found that crime in the immediate area of SugarHouse Casino in Philadelphia's Fishtown section has not increased since the casino opened 2010. The study, by Lallen T. Johnson, assistant professor of criminal justice at Drexel University, and Jerry H. Ratcliffe, chair of Temple University's department of criminal justice, says crime rates in Fishtown were largely unaffected by the arrival of SugarHouse in the 1000 block of North Delaware Avenue in September 2010.
NEWS
February 12, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA While serving 12 years in state prison for armed robbery and assault, Phillip Eric Weems renounced his violent past and wrote a book detailing the more enlightened path he planned to pursue upon his release. "White-collar crime is one of the most sophisticated rackets of illegal activity today," he said in his jailhouse manuscript. "Unlimited amounts of money can be made virtually overnight, and the parties involved usually face minimal and/or no consequences at all. " Weems was right about one thing.
NEWS
February 12, 2014 | BY ASHLEY KUHN, Daily News Staff Writer kuhna@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
A PHILADELPHIA man will serve more than 10 years in a federal lockup for his role as the mastermind and leader in an elaborate check-cashing scheme, U.S. District Judge Juan R. Sanchez ruled yesterday. Phillip Eric Weems, 36, was sentenced to 10 years, 1 month in prison for forging and counterfeiting checks totaling $1.2 million with the help of 70 accomplices. Weems' organization defrauded and attempted to defraud more than 50 victims, including banks, check-cashing companies and dog breeders, officials said.
NEWS
July 17, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
FBI divers searched the murky waters of the Schuylkill for hours Monday, looking for evidence under the Falls Bridge. It could not be learned what the Underwater Search and Evidence Response Team was looking for, but the agents were not looking for a body or human remains, according to a law enforcement official familiar with the investigation. A Philadelphia police officer secured a perimeter around the sidewalk and grass as about a dozen FBI agents set up a command post beside the bridge's railing off Kelly Drive.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
He has defended Wall Street hedge fund and bond fraudsters, a corporate finance chief accused of raiding his own company, a U.S. defense secretary turned alleged bank predator, and the messianic leader of a global cult. New York lawyer Charles A. Stillman speaks of these clients affectionately, even the ones who were found guilty and sent to prison. For example: Ex- Tyco chief financial officer Mark Swartz , who did hard time after directors testified he pocketed $50 million in unauthorized pay, was "one of the finest men I have met in my entire life," Stillman told me from the porch of his vacation home in the Berkshire Mountains.
NEWS
November 24, 2012
Albert Kleiner, 51, a Philadelphia native who became a prosecutor in Arizona, died Sunday, Nov. 4, of melanoma at a hospice in Tucson. For the last nine years, Mr. Kleiner was an assistant attorney general in the Tucson office of the U.S. Justice Department, where he focused on white-collar crime. "Because he was principled and a person of integrity, he was constantly looking for an occupation where he could make a difference," said his brother, Michael. "He was adept at whatever he tried.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2012 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
The lake was freezing. The bunks were rustic. The "amenities" included a community bathroom a hefty walk from those bunks. The wake-up call was the shrill blast of a bugle. But Camp Kennebec in North Belgrade, Maine, was a haven for generations of boys - many from Philly - who had a passionate attachment to a place where the word competition is often the first mentioned when reminiscing. Last month, 14 of those "boys," now 55-year-old men, got together for a long weekend reunion in Garrison, N.Y., of a camp that doesn't exist anymore - it closed in 1991 after 84 years as a secular Jewish camp, and the name now belongs to two other camps at the site.
NEWS
July 28, 2012 | Associated Press
TRENTON - New Jersey's economic development agency has tapped as its new chief executive officer a top aide to Gov. Christie and former longtime federal prosecutor who was once embroiled in a controversy over a $46,000 loan she got from Christie when he was a U.S. attorney. The board of the Economic Development Authority on Wednesday selected Michele Brown for the $225,000 job as part of a restructuring. CEO Caren Franzini announced she would step down on Sept. 30 after 21 years to pursue opportunity in the private sector.
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