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White Heat

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
‘I'm a child of the Sixties," says acclaimed British screenwriter Paula Milne (The Politician's Wife, Night Watch), whose latest drama, White Heat, opens in that strange, turbulent, mythic decade. "There was between the 1950s and 1960s this huge, seismic change ... and I was a part of that," says Milne, 64. A six-episode ensemble piece premiering Wednesday on BBC America, White Heat is a bold, fabulously written (if at times overbearing) chronicle of the political and social changes which sweep through Britain beginning in the mid-1960s and which shaped — and in some cases, radically misshaped — a generation.
NEWS
September 23, 2011
Frank Driggs, 81, a music historian and producer who amassed a world-class archive of more than 100,000 jazz-related images, was found dead of natural causes at his Manhattan home Tuesday. A 1952 Princeton University graduate, Mr. Driggs became enamored with jazz and swing while listening to late-night broadcasts in the 1930s. He later joined Marshall Stearns, founder of the Rutgers University-based Institute of Jazz Studies, and began documenting jazz history. Mr. Driggs produced numerous recordings, including Columbia Records' Robert Johnson: The Complete Recordings . He received a Grammy for it in 1991.
NEWS
December 27, 1999 | By Teresa Leo
I used to call it like this: stun gun, flamethrower, harpoon, maimer. Whatever the charge, the scarred heart followed; I loved like an army at the brink of war - all battle plans and camouflage, shoot to kill, seizures. The romance: first tear gas, then morphine, nights of white heat, sutures, slash and burn, shock. But then, right at the end of the 20th century, in the year of the hostage, as if dropped by chopper, a bomb that didn't explode - you, conscientious objector, accident, rapture, and me, auto-aim and rapid-fire.
NEWS
May 4, 1988 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
"If you can't stand the heat, get out of the movie theater. " - Harry S. Truman OK, so that's not exactly what he said. But if the 33d president were around in '88, surely that's what he would say - scanning the day's Hollywood trades over his coffee and Kellogg's Snack Pack. There, in the Daily Variety and Hollywood Reporter logs of films in production and ready for release, can be counted not one, not two, not three, but four movies packing heat in their titles. They are: Dead Heat, which stars Treat Williams and Joe Piscopo as two dissimilar cops (one's dead, one's not)
LIVING
May 14, 2000 | By Alex Richmond, FOR THE INQUIRER
So what comes first? The idea for a nightspot that celebrates films from the 1930s and '40s, or finding a location that is almost a secret? Sometimes the best places hide in plain sight. Bar Noir, right smack in the middle of Center City, is tucked away like a memory, on 18th Street between Chestnut and Sansom. The facade is set back from the sidewalk, and to enter, one needs to descend a flight of stairs. David Carroll, co-owner and impresario of Bar Noir (along with Philadelphia lawyer Larry Berk)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1996 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last fall, David Bowie released an experimental record - the Brian Eno collaboration Outside - and tried to connect with alternative fans by touring with Nine Inch Nails. Trouble was, the kids didn't care. And Bowie's longtime loyalists weren't too pleased to hear arty amelodic indulgences in place of the hits they paid for. Time for a career adjustment: On Friday, Bowie returned to town for a fan-friendly show at the sold-out 2,300-capacity Electric Factory, one of four U.S. dates he's playing while working on a new album, Earthlings, in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1990 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The resurgence in mob movies signals a return to one of Hollywood's most reliable movie staples. Here's a list of some of the classic mob movies available on video. LITTLE CAESAR. Edward G. Robinson stars as the original scenery-chewing mob boss in this 1930 biography of a gangster modeled after Al Capone. A movie that set the standard for the mob movies to follow. PUBLIC ENEMY. A year later, in 1931, James Cagney had the title role in another story about the rise and fall of a brutal gangster.
NEWS
July 28, 2000
How is the Philadelphia sports scene like a night when the fog rolls in? Suddenly, you look up and the stars have disappeared. Over there, isn't that where Curt Schilling, the talented, talkative, if not always huggable pitcher, used to throw white heat for the Phillies? Now, he's gone - off to shine in the desert sky over Phoenix for a team called the Diamondbacks that didn't exist four years ago. Bitter it tastes, but the arriviste D-Backs, not the venerable Phils, are now the kind of winning, well-heeled outfit that Mr. Schilling has so volubly yearned to join.
NEWS
September 7, 1996 | By E. J. DIONNE JR
"New and improved" is the oldest and least-improved-upon catchphrase in American advertising. To be "modern," "up-to-date" and "forward-looking" is to come as close to sainthood as our secular and technological era permits. The old song may declare that it's hip to be square, but it's even hipper to be hip. That is why Clinton won the battle of the conventions. Dole emerged with an issue, his big tax cut. Clinton emerged with a theme. You're no doubt sick and tired of hearing Clinton talk about that bridge to the 21st century (assuming you've been listening)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1986 | By Richard Fuller, Special to The Inquirer
When you last dropped in on British agent Bernard Samson, in Berlin Game by Len Deighton, he was dealing with a wicket way beyond sticky. Deighton's Mexico Set (Ballantine, $4.50) is another sticky one, taking up the further adventures of Samson. But . . . if you read it first, you'll ruin the smashing conclusion of Berlin Game. Do yourself a favor if you like Deighton - and you should, because he's head of the spy/thriller class with Graham Greene and John le Carre - and pick up the earlier book first, then read this one. The tale skips back and forth between Mexico City and London and Berlin with armchair ease.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013
LAST FRIDAY, a few dozen people suddenly started following me on Twitter. "Cool," I thought. "All this writing is finally paying off. " I puffed my chest out, grateful that my eight novels and countless columns were earning me recognition where it counts - on Twitter. While silently thumbing my nose at those haughty book reviewers and the elitist snobs who run the New York Times best-sellers list, I began typing a tweet to thank the little people. "At long last, after years of hard work and sacrifice, I've arrived among the giants in my craft.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
‘I'm a child of the Sixties," says acclaimed British screenwriter Paula Milne (The Politician's Wife, Night Watch), whose latest drama, White Heat, opens in that strange, turbulent, mythic decade. "There was between the 1950s and 1960s this huge, seismic change ... and I was a part of that," says Milne, 64. A six-episode ensemble piece premiering Wednesday on BBC America, White Heat is a bold, fabulously written (if at times overbearing) chronicle of the political and social changes which sweep through Britain beginning in the mid-1960s and which shaped — and in some cases, radically misshaped — a generation.
NEWS
September 23, 2011
Frank Driggs, 81, a music historian and producer who amassed a world-class archive of more than 100,000 jazz-related images, was found dead of natural causes at his Manhattan home Tuesday. A 1952 Princeton University graduate, Mr. Driggs became enamored with jazz and swing while listening to late-night broadcasts in the 1930s. He later joined Marshall Stearns, founder of the Rutgers University-based Institute of Jazz Studies, and began documenting jazz history. Mr. Driggs produced numerous recordings, including Columbia Records' Robert Johnson: The Complete Recordings . He received a Grammy for it in 1991.
NEWS
March 18, 2010 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
Neil Young is one of those musicians whom people either love or hate, for pretty much the same reasons. (At least they're never neutral about him!) His voice is a baleful wail that goes well with his pining, often surrealistically wrought Americana rock songs about need and want, missteps and new directions. And, oh, does he like to shift gears as a guitar player, between a campfire-intimate, rustic-acoustic folk style and a ragged, howling at the winds, cranking and stomping electric approach that ebbs and flows like a stormy sea. If all that sounds good to you, may I draw your attention to "Neil Young Trunk Show: Scenes from a Concert," the latest in a long line of film portraits of the artist which he's again co-produced as one Bernard Shakey.
NEWS
March 22, 2007 | By James P. Pinkerton
Confession is good for the soul - even in Washington. How do I know? Because many there confess, albeit in the circuitous style of the Beltway. We all know of cases in which the malefactor just blurts out his guilt years after the crime; that seems to be what's happening, in stages, to O.J. Simpson. But Washingtonians, who excel in the sneaky arts of manipulation, confess in their own Machiavellian manner, with one eye on the camera and the other on the history books. The very obviousness of such confessions, paper or electronic, forces one to conclude that there's method in this self-incriminating madness.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2000 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Next to the white heat generated by a 14-year-old girl, the temperature of Rachmaninoff's passion feels kind of tepid. A comic look at two teen groupies who idolize an eccentric concert pianist, The World of Henry Orient (1964) stars Peter Sellers as the musician/playboy desired by all the females in New York. The teenagers are played by Tippy Walker, tossing the best haircut in Hollywood history, and Merrie Spaeth, a tightly curled blonde who catches on quicker than her pal that a teen crush is sometimes displaced feelings for one's own father.
NEWS
July 28, 2000
How is the Philadelphia sports scene like a night when the fog rolls in? Suddenly, you look up and the stars have disappeared. Over there, isn't that where Curt Schilling, the talented, talkative, if not always huggable pitcher, used to throw white heat for the Phillies? Now, he's gone - off to shine in the desert sky over Phoenix for a team called the Diamondbacks that didn't exist four years ago. Bitter it tastes, but the arriviste D-Backs, not the venerable Phils, are now the kind of winning, well-heeled outfit that Mr. Schilling has so volubly yearned to join.
LIVING
May 14, 2000 | By Alex Richmond, FOR THE INQUIRER
So what comes first? The idea for a nightspot that celebrates films from the 1930s and '40s, or finding a location that is almost a secret? Sometimes the best places hide in plain sight. Bar Noir, right smack in the middle of Center City, is tucked away like a memory, on 18th Street between Chestnut and Sansom. The facade is set back from the sidewalk, and to enter, one needs to descend a flight of stairs. David Carroll, co-owner and impresario of Bar Noir (along with Philadelphia lawyer Larry Berk)
NEWS
December 27, 1999 | By Teresa Leo
I used to call it like this: stun gun, flamethrower, harpoon, maimer. Whatever the charge, the scarred heart followed; I loved like an army at the brink of war - all battle plans and camouflage, shoot to kill, seizures. The romance: first tear gas, then morphine, nights of white heat, sutures, slash and burn, shock. But then, right at the end of the 20th century, in the year of the hostage, as if dropped by chopper, a bomb that didn't explode - you, conscientious objector, accident, rapture, and me, auto-aim and rapid-fire.
NEWS
July 25, 1999 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Forget Woodstock. This is Disneyland, a rock-and-roll theme park. To survive it, you need a map and a plan. There are 70 bands playing on stages that are 20 minutes apart, a trek through a heat-scorched midway of mud, dope, flesh, and $4 bottled water by Ogden, that company responsible for food at the Vet. Tuned out? There are 40 movies screening 24 hours a day, an extreme-sports park, nightly raves, and booths to play video games, get your e-mail, tattoo your triceps, or paint your breasts.
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