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NEWS
July 28, 1986
Apparently even the law is no obstacle when the Reagan administration wants to help the Teamsters Union - the only major labor union to support Ronald Reagan's candidacy in 1980 and again in 1984. Federal law requires the government to remain neutral in contests between unions for the right to represent workers. That, however, didn't stop the White House last fall from helping the Teamsters win a close election to represent civilian employees at Fort Sill, Okla. Mitchell Daniels, political director for the White House, personally arranged for the Army to help the Teamsters.
NEWS
August 7, 1988 | Inquirer Washington Bureau
Tourist alert: If you're planning to say "cheese" in front of the White House this summer, forget it. Not only is the presidential mansion draped in plastic cloth, suggesting a creation by wrap-artist Christo, but also an 8-foot-high gray plywood fence obscures much of what is left of the view from Pennsylvania Avenue. Contractors are stripping the White House of 30-odd coats of paint it has accumulated since 1797. The porous Aquia Creek sandstone has been painted periodically since it was initially whitewashed, each coat on top of the other.
NEWS
January 28, 2000 | PHOTO CAPTION ASSOCIATED PRESS
Hot! Hot! Hot! there's more to running for president then just debating policy - you even have to do some very silly things. In the first installment of our weekly series, we find Al "What's it going to take to make me an Alpha Male?" Gore contributing to an Iowa potluck supper.
LIVING
July 13, 1986 | By Gary Haynes, Inquirer Graphic Arts Director
One of the most romanticized jobs in news photography is the assignment to cover the White House. As is sometimes the case, however, the romance differs from the reality. For reasons of security and politics, few unguarded moments of a President or his family are ever recorded on film. Almost all the pictures result from situations that are stage-managed and stopwatch-timed. Photographers have never had unlimited access to the President, but in recent years the proliferation of White House photographers, representing newspapers, magazines, television networks and independent stations as well as the photographers on the White House staff, has made shooting more difficult, even when the White House cooperates with a few minutes of the President's time.
NEWS
December 26, 1996 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
President Clinton and his family celebrated Christmas in the White House yesterday, with the President giving his wife a book that takes a nostalgic look at baseball, a spokesman said yesterday. Hillary Rodham Clinton, a longtime Chicago Cubs fan, received the gift of Mudville Diaries, a book of baseball memories collected by Mike Schacht, said the spokesman, Josh Silverman. Details of other gifts were not immediately available so as not to intrude on the Clintons' privacy, Silverman said.
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | By Jerry Markon and Peter Wallsten, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The White House and the nation's most prominent charities are embroiled in a tense, behind-the-scenes debate over President Obama's push to scale back the nearly century-old tax deduction on donations that the charities say is crucial for their financial health. In a series of recent meetings and calls, top White House aides have pressed nonprofit groups to line up behind the president's plan for reducing the federal deficit and averting the year-end fiscal cliff, according to people familiar with the talks.
NEWS
December 24, 2009 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
Three things to keep in mind should I ever be invited back to a White House holiday party: Uttering "Salahi" in line is like saying "bomb" on an airplane; know how to address the first lady before you're in the room with her; and don't blink - you won't get a second picture for a Christmas photo with the commander in chief. Last week, my wife and I arrived at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. about 15 minutes before a party's scheduled 7 p.m. start time. That commencement hour was the first difference we noted when comparing the current occupants to their predecessors - the Bushes' started, and ended earlier.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2000 | By Henri Sault, FOR THE INQUIRER
The mint will celebrate the 200th anniversary of the completion of the White House with a medal to be issued this winter. It will depict the building within a wreath topped by a banner with the dates 1800-2000. The reverse will carry portraits of John and Abigail Adams, the first presidential couple to live in the building. Their cameo portraits, with more garlands under them, will give the medal an old-fashioned charm. With the date 1800 prominently placed on the reverse, it will make it essential for the medal to appear before the end of December.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
  LINDA RONSTADT   didn't make it to New York in April when she was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, but Parkinson's disease didn't stop her from going to the White House. Yesterday, President Obama hung a National Medal of Arts around her neck and revealed, "I had a little crush on her back in the day. " A military aide brought Ronstadt, 68, into the East Room by wheelchair, but she walked to the stage to receive her award as a citation was read honoring her "one-of-a-kind voice" that paved the way for generations of female artists.
NEWS
July 19, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
WILMINGTON - President Obama on Thursday offered American assistance in trying to determine what happened to a Malaysian airliner that broke apart under mysterious circumstances over what is essentially a combat zone in eastern Ukraine. Saying the incident appeared to be a "terrible tragedy," the president said the government's "first priority" is determining if any Americans were aboard. In brief remarks about the crash during an appearance in Wilmington, Obama offered his condolences to the families of the 295 passengers and crew on the plane, none of whom is believed to have survived.
NEWS
July 9, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia teacher LeShawna Coleman had some interesting lunch company Wednesday: President Obama. Coleman, a 13-year Philadelphia School District veteran, teacher coach, and English as a Second Language teacher, had expected to travel to Washington for a U.S. Department of Education event about teacher equity. (The Education Department introduced a program Monday to get more strong teachers in the nation's poorest schools.) But last week, she learned she was one of four teachers nationwide chosen to lunch with the president and Education Secretary Arne Duncan.
NEWS
June 20, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
For more than a year, Mideast analysts have warned about an al-Qaeda offshoot that was creating a virtual state in eastern Syria and western Iraq, where it trained European and American recruits. The Obama team failed to focus on this virulent threat to U.S. interests, either in Syria or Iraq. Now those jihadis - known as the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) - have jolted the region by pouring out of Syria, seizing Iraq's second-largest city, Mosul, and heading toward Baghdad "This is al-Qaeda 6.0," says Ryan Crocker, the former U.S. ambassador to Baghdad and Kabul, "and they will be stronger than they ever were in Afghanistan.
NEWS
June 19, 2014 | By Casey Fabris, Inquirer Staff Writer
Students on the EVX Team thought they had until the end of June to finish building their fuel-efficient Factory Five 818 electric blue race car. But then they found out they would have to get the project - one they have been working on their entire year at the Workshop School in West Philadelphia - finished about two weeks early. The high schoolers stayed late weekdays and even came in on Saturdays to get the job done. "It's kind of like a sports team, too," said Simon Hauger, creator and leader of the EVX Team.
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
On Tuesday, the utter failure of White House efforts on Syria became embarrassingly public. Lakdhar Brahimi, the U.N. special envoy who had brokered Syrian peace talks in Geneva, quit in frustration. U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon singled out Syrian government stonewalling as a key cause of failure. So much for administration hopes of finding a political solution. Also on Tuesday, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius made an undiplomatic public critique of President Obama's failure to use force as he had pledged if Assad used chemical weapons.
NEWS
May 12, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Here's the real Benghazi scandal: Republicans have turned the deaths of four brave Americans into a campaign tool to galvanize their base. Eight congressional investigations, along with an independent review board, have laid out the facts about the 2012 attack on the U.S. consulate. There have been 13 public hearings, the release of 25,000 pages of documents, and 50 briefings on the security failures that led to the deaths of Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans. None offered a shred of evidence that White House political considerations led to their deaths.
NEWS
May 8, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
TEACHER ANN LEANESS plans to have the time of her life today at the White House, where she is scheduled to meet Vice President Joe Biden and his wife, educator Jill Biden. "This is going to be a ton of fun," she said last night. Leaness, a 10th- and 12th-grade English teacher at Franklin Learning Center in Spring Garden, was one of 20 teachers selected nationwide to represent their school districts at the Teacher Appreciation Social at the White House. The event commemorates National Teacher Appreciation Week - May 5-10.
NEWS
May 2, 2014
As reports of colleges' failure to deal with sexual assault have drawn attention to campuses from Swarthmore to Berkeley and Penn State to Florida State, it's become clear that the problem afflicts higher education at large. The White House and others are beginning to respond accordingly. The first report of a White House task force on the issue this week noted the astonishing finding that, according to a 2007 report for the National Institute of Justice, nearly one in five female students suffers an attempted or actual sexual assault during college.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Julia Roberts on grief Julia Roberts , 46, is eloquent on her grief following the February death of her half-sister, Nancy Motes , of a drug overdose. "It's hour by hour some days, but you just keep looking ahead," Roberts tells the Wall Street Journal Magazine in her first public chat about Motes' death. Motes was the child of Roberts' mother Betty Lou 's second marriage, to Michael Motes . Roberts continues, "But [as with] any situation of challenge and despair, we must find a way, as a family.
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