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NEWS
July 28, 1986
Apparently even the law is no obstacle when the Reagan administration wants to help the Teamsters Union - the only major labor union to support Ronald Reagan's candidacy in 1980 and again in 1984. Federal law requires the government to remain neutral in contests between unions for the right to represent workers. That, however, didn't stop the White House last fall from helping the Teamsters win a close election to represent civilian employees at Fort Sill, Okla. Mitchell Daniels, political director for the White House, personally arranged for the Army to help the Teamsters.
NEWS
August 7, 1988 | Inquirer Washington Bureau
Tourist alert: If you're planning to say "cheese" in front of the White House this summer, forget it. Not only is the presidential mansion draped in plastic cloth, suggesting a creation by wrap-artist Christo, but also an 8-foot-high gray plywood fence obscures much of what is left of the view from Pennsylvania Avenue. Contractors are stripping the White House of 30-odd coats of paint it has accumulated since 1797. The porous Aquia Creek sandstone has been painted periodically since it was initially whitewashed, each coat on top of the other.
NEWS
January 28, 2000 | PHOTO CAPTION ASSOCIATED PRESS
Hot! Hot! Hot! there's more to running for president then just debating policy - you even have to do some very silly things. In the first installment of our weekly series, we find Al "What's it going to take to make me an Alpha Male?" Gore contributing to an Iowa potluck supper.
LIVING
July 13, 1986 | By Gary Haynes, Inquirer Graphic Arts Director
One of the most romanticized jobs in news photography is the assignment to cover the White House. As is sometimes the case, however, the romance differs from the reality. For reasons of security and politics, few unguarded moments of a President or his family are ever recorded on film. Almost all the pictures result from situations that are stage-managed and stopwatch-timed. Photographers have never had unlimited access to the President, but in recent years the proliferation of White House photographers, representing newspapers, magazines, television networks and independent stations as well as the photographers on the White House staff, has made shooting more difficult, even when the White House cooperates with a few minutes of the President's time.
NEWS
December 26, 1996 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
President Clinton and his family celebrated Christmas in the White House yesterday, with the President giving his wife a book that takes a nostalgic look at baseball, a spokesman said yesterday. Hillary Rodham Clinton, a longtime Chicago Cubs fan, received the gift of Mudville Diaries, a book of baseball memories collected by Mike Schacht, said the spokesman, Josh Silverman. Details of other gifts were not immediately available so as not to intrude on the Clintons' privacy, Silverman said.
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | By Jerry Markon and Peter Wallsten, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The White House and the nation's most prominent charities are embroiled in a tense, behind-the-scenes debate over President Obama's push to scale back the nearly century-old tax deduction on donations that the charities say is crucial for their financial health. In a series of recent meetings and calls, top White House aides have pressed nonprofit groups to line up behind the president's plan for reducing the federal deficit and averting the year-end fiscal cliff, according to people familiar with the talks.
NEWS
December 24, 2009 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
Three things to keep in mind should I ever be invited back to a White House holiday party: Uttering "Salahi" in line is like saying "bomb" on an airplane; know how to address the first lady before you're in the room with her; and don't blink - you won't get a second picture for a Christmas photo with the commander in chief. Last week, my wife and I arrived at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. about 15 minutes before a party's scheduled 7 p.m. start time. That commencement hour was the first difference we noted when comparing the current occupants to their predecessors - the Bushes' started, and ended earlier.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2000 | By Henri Sault, FOR THE INQUIRER
The mint will celebrate the 200th anniversary of the completion of the White House with a medal to be issued this winter. It will depict the building within a wreath topped by a banner with the dates 1800-2000. The reverse will carry portraits of John and Abigail Adams, the first presidential couple to live in the building. Their cameo portraits, with more garlands under them, will give the medal an old-fashioned charm. With the date 1800 prominently placed on the reverse, it will make it essential for the medal to appear before the end of December.
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BUSINESS
January 22, 2015 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Privacy advocates say they welcome the Obama administration's renewed emphasis on enhancing data security and protecting identity-theft victims, consumers who shop online, and children whose schools sell their personal information. But they are worried by details emerging from the White House - especially by drafts of a proposed federal data-breach law that would preempt stronger state laws. Breach disclosures mandated by states such as California are a main reason why Americans know about major data-security lapses in the first place.
NEWS
January 22, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - President Obama and Vice President Biden are expected in Philadelphia next week, where they are scheduled to speak at the House Democrats' policy retreat in Society Hill. The two-day gathering will bring the entire caucus to the city for two days of huddling about their strategy for the next two years. Obama will speak next Thursday and Biden the following day, the White House said. Politico first reported their plans. Local congressmen hope the event will also give them a chance to show off the city as Philadelphia pushes to host the 2016 Democratic National Convention.
NEWS
January 14, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
First impressions suggest the Republicans in control of Congress aren't ready to put aside partisanship and govern if it means making peace with President Obama, who is scheduled to meet with congressional leaders at the White House today. In a resounding rebuke of House Speaker John Boehner's past willingness to compromise with the president, 24 Republicans voted against his reelection last week. Due to a number of absences, Boehner (R., Ohio) didn't need their votes. Still, it marked only the fourth time since 1913 that a speaker was elected without a majority of the full House.
NEWS
January 10, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Coleen Christian Burke's fingerprints were all over the festive ornaments accenting America's most famous residence this past holiday season. From the East Room to the State Dining Room, Burke, of Washington Crossing, Bucks County, was part of a massive effort to spruce up the White House for the holidays. The project, she said, was both glamorous and exhausting. "It's a lot of blood, sweat, and glitter," she said last month. For at least 50 years, the rooms and offices at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue have been festooned with Christmas trees and other holiday symbols, generally at the first lady's direction.
NEWS
January 6, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chionque Mines, 22, was not sure how to react to the news that she'd been chosen to introduce President Obama at the recent White House College Opportunity Summit. It was the last week of classes at Goucher College, and the senior from North Philadelphia was trying to finish a paper for one class and prepare a presentation for another, and the summit was just three days away. "I didn't know if I should be excited or cry," Mines recalled. So the young woman summoned the grit, good humor, and smarts that have been attracting notice since she was a fifth grader at KIPP Philadelphia Charter School.
REAL_ESTATE
December 22, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Certain homes, like certain people, have an instant presence, a distinctiveness that's easier felt than explained. And on a Collingswood street that faces the town's expansive Knight Park, set on a rise, stands such a house. It was built in 1907 by Newton Baker Taylor Roney, who would later establish a legacy as a developer in Miami Beach with his Roney Plaza Hotel on Collins Avenue, a glamour destination early in the 20th century. The home Roney built in Collingswood, originally in the Victorian style, has gone on to become a haven for former Collingswood Mayor Michael Brennan and his wife, Jean, who treasure its legacy of longtime owners.
NEWS
December 3, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
PRESIDENT OBAMA has tapped Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey to co-chair a "Task Force on 21st Century Policing. " Ramsey and Mayor Nutter were with a large delegation of civil-rights leaders and big-city mayors and police chiefs at the White House yesterday to discuss strengthening the relationship between police departments and civilians in the wake of unrest triggered by a grand jury's decision last week not to indict a Ferguson, Mo.,...
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
BOCA RATON, Fla. - One veteran of many Republican Governors Association meetings called it "the peacock parade. " Heads turned as at least a half-dozen governors considered potential 2016 presidential candidates swept with their entourages through the colonnaded walks and polished palazzos of a luxury oceanside resort here Wednesday - including, of course, the outgoing chairman of the association, Gov. Christie. "You can see them all profiling," said Charles Breslin, a Philadelphia business consultant who has advised governors and their staffs on health-care issues and is attending the conference.
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
INADVERTENTLY just in time for Halloween, multimedia funnyman Harry Shearer is ringing America's doorbell with what he calls the "strangest, creepiest, funniest, spookiest" character he's ever played. Charles Montgomery Burns, the millionaire-boss-from-hell who Shearer has voiced on Fox's "The Simpsons" for the last 24 years? Hardly. Instead, the 70-year-old Shearer's six-part "Nixon's the One" series - which debuted for a U.S. audience this week on YouTube - tackles what the comedian and actor agreed is "the Great Dark Whale" of his baby-boomer generation: 37th president Richard Nixon, who resigned in disgrace 40 years ago. On Monday, Shearer hits Philadelphia's World Cafe Live for a special, interactive show that mixes clips of the series - which aired earlier this year in the United Kingdom - with tales of his half-century fascination with Nixon and a question-and-answer session.
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Leon Panetta has taken a lot of heat for publicly dumping on Barack Obama's foreign policy while the president is still in the White House. Where's his loyalty? the critics ask, as Panetta makes the publicity rounds for his new memoir, Worthy Fights , which says tough things about Obama's past policies on Syria and Iraq. Shouldn't Panetta, who served as CIA director and defense secretary during Obama's first term, have zipped his lip until his former boss left office? Absolutely not. Panetta - a child of Italian immigrants who believes deeply in America's promise - is trying to nudge Obama to adopt a more engaged style of governing; he rightly believes this is the only way Obama can break through the paralysis in Washington and exert more forceful foreign policy leadership in the future.
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