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White Men

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NEWS
November 1, 1989 | By Joseph P. Blake, Daily News Staff Writer
Four white men accused of beating two African Americans in alleged racially motivated attacks have been ordered to stand trial on charges ranging from ethnic intimidation to criminal conspiracy and weapons violations. Two of the men, Ronald Trunkwalter, 24, of Edgemont Street near Cambria, and Stephen Copeland, 26, of Richmond Street near Venango, had their bails reduced to $25,000 because Judge Louis G.F. Retacco found they did not actually participate in the attacks. Trunkwalter's bail had been $350,000, and Copeland's was $500,000.
NEWS
October 9, 1988 | By Lou Perfidio, Special to The Inquirer
The incident reports in the police station can be anticipated after any weekend. The accounts are familiar: Somebody drives through a stone wall after failing to make a sharp turn in the road. The patrol officer arrives and notices a strong odor of alcohol on the driver's breath. The hospital treats the driver's wounds and draws a blood sample. The results are returned and the driver is charged with drunken driving. The reports are variations on the same theme. Most times the drunken driver is arrested after an accident; others are arrested after a patrol officer sees the driver weaving in and out of traffic.
NEWS
June 7, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - The gap in life expectancy between black and white Americans is smaller than it has ever been, thanks largely to a decline in the number of deaths resulting from heart disease and HIV infection, a new analysis has found. The bad news is that the gap is still large: A black baby boy born today can expect to live 5.4 fewer years, on average, than his white counterpart, and a black baby girl will die 3.7 years earlier, on average, than her white counterpart. What's more, the narrowing of the gap between 2003 and 2008 is due in part to a troubling development among whites: They are more likely than in the past to die from overdoses of prescription medications like OxyContin and Vicodin, along with other unintentional poisonings.
NEWS
June 23, 1995 | by Gail Sheehy, New York Times
The Supreme Court's ruling limiting racial preferences in federal programs is one more sign that the nation is in a mood to roll back affirmative action. President Clinton already has laid out an early campaign strategy of offering "sympathy and understanding" to angry white men who resent such programs. A March Washington Post/ABC News poll showed that three out of four Americans favor cutting back. Even if affirmative action is rolled back, Democratic and Republican politicians should know that it won't cure the anxiety and anger of white men. Regardless of economic cycles, companies will continue to cut back management to be more productive, and the number of male-dominated blue-collar jobs will keep shrinking.
NEWS
April 13, 1995 | BY LINDA WRIGHT MOORE
In recent weeks, I've heard two words with increasing frequency. One is "fairness," as in "affirmative action just isn't fair to white men. " The other is "feelings" - as in "women and minorities who advance themselves based solely on gender and race just don't understand how awful it feels to be passed over and pushed aside - when one is white, male, better qualified and more deserving of a job, promotion or admission to the ...
NEWS
September 21, 1989 | By Edward Moran, Sheila Simmons and Kurt Heine, Daily News Staff Writers Staff writers Jack McGuire, Gloria Campisi and Darryl Lynette Figueroa contributed to this report
A carload of white men, seeking to avenge a girlfriend's necklace- snatching, randomly battered two black men yesterday at Kensington bus stops in what police said were racial attacks. Four whites seized by passing police officers after the second bus-stop beating were arraigned this morning on charges of assault, ethnic intimidation, recklessly endangering others, possessing instruments of crime and conspiracy. Bail set for the four ranged from $250,000 to $500,000. Police said the four whites, angered by the claim of one of their girlfriends that black men had snatched her necklace at a convenience store, drove down Kensington Avenue hours later and attacked two black who had nothing to do with the theft.
NEWS
April 22, 1992 | By GARY CORSERI
My friends and I are losers. We hold Ph.D. degrees in the humanities and we each have between 3 and 20 years of teaching experience. Some of us have awards and other honors. We all like teaching, and some of us love it. Yet we have been unable to find full-time, permanent employment in university teaching since the mid-1970s. My friends and I are white men in our thirties and forties. For years we have watched as less-qualified women were hired into positions that we could probably have filled with more distinction.
NEWS
September 24, 2010
RE THE SEPT. 16 article on City Councilwoman Maria Quiñones-Sánchez's mayoral potential: The councilwoman was quoted as saying, "Who's going to come to a meeting if you're going to be sitting around all white men?" This statement demonstrates either a clear lack of information or is intentionally misleading. Contrary to the councilwoman's statement, the Frankford Special Services District is a diverse organization. As I explained to reporter Catherine Lucey, our board has six members out of its nine-member capacity: Jim McCarthy, a white male.
NEWS
November 12, 1995 | By Donna St. George, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
For Brian Gilhooly, the path to the top was blocked. He had been a firefighter for 12 years, a high achiever, and he was sure he'd be promoted. For John Kelly, the big complaint was about his son's chances to go to a stellar high school. He was furious to learn there was a cap for whites. Last summer, these two middle-class white men from the southwest side of Chicago joined the national backlash against affirmative action, which has become an issue in Congress, on the presidential campaign trail, and in the legislatures of 16 states, including Pennsylvania.
NEWS
September 18, 1995 | By Rena Singer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As the number of officers on the borough's police force continues to dwindle, the number under investigation continues to increase. The borough last week launched its third investigation in the last month into the actions of a police officer, Mayor Jack Salamone said. The probe into actions of veteran officer Anthony Januzelli began after residents of the 800 block of Arch Street complained to the mayor's office. The residents maintain that Januzelli gave preferential treatment to two white men who harassed two black women in an early-morning incident Sept.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 14, 2015 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
THE NUMBERS that drive Philadelphia prison-reform advocate Patricia Vickers on her mission aren't the big abstract ones. Not 36,000, the shocking recent estimate of young black men in Philadelphia either behind bars or dead before their time. Not 1,500,000, the national tally of what academics now call "missing black men. " No, the digits that motivate the 66-year-old mom have been pounded with a sharp needle, black ink jabbed into the soft flesh under Vickers' right bicep - 20 digits that mark the birthdays of her four kids as well as her own. Vickers' stark tattoo serves as the tangible reminder of what's missing from her life . . . her three sons.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Rep. John Lewis, the civil rights leader who was beaten as he and others marched in 1965 from Selma to Montgomery, Ala., had already seen the film Selma three times. But he was invited to watch it again Friday - with President Obama at the White House. "I tell you, I cried some more," said Lewis, 74, who was teargassed and clubbed on the head by Alabama state troopers during the historic march that led to passage of the Voting Rights Act. His head bears the scars. "I saw death.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Oscar overlooks Adams, etc. Whelp, Thursday morning they announced the Oscar nominations. It was a great year for movies, artistically if not at the box office (down 5 percent), and not all the good stuff could get in. But when the dust settled, it was weird. And it was . . . white. And guy. As in white guy . We're sort of ticked that such Sideshow favorites as Amy Adams and Jennifer Aniston were snubbed. But it's nice to see Laura Dern recognized in the best supporting actress category for her work in Wild . . . . Also, The Lego Movie got bupkis.
NEWS
June 17, 2014
DIANE PETERS was looking for love in all the wrong places, or at least one wrong place. Peters, 44, is pretty, single, a social worker for a Center City medical nonprofit, happy even while wanting a counterpart - a committed, successful male. A Colorado native who never married or had kids, Peters tried the usual things. She asked friends if they knew "anyone" (meaning an eligible male), went to wine tastings, sporting events, church, some singles events, but couldn't connect with the man of her dreams.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
As if it weren't bad enough to lose your hair, a University of Pennsylvania researcher has added a medical reason to worry about what seems to be a cosmetic problem. She found a connection between baldness and prostate cancer in African American men. Other studies have examined whether bald men - mostly white bald men - are at higher risk. Some studies suggested a relationship, but the results are not clear-cut. Charnita Zeigler-Johnson, a Penn epidemiologist, decided to focus on African American men because they have a 50 to 60 percent higher risk of being diagnosed with cancer than white men and are twice as likely to die of it. The study compared 318 African American men with prostate cancer to 219 healthy African American controls.
NEWS
April 2, 2013 | BY CHARLOTTE AND HARRIET CHILDRESS, For the Daily News
IMAGINE if African-American men and boys were committing mass shootings month after month, year after year. Articles and interviews would flood the media, and we'd have political debates demanding that African-Americans be "held accountable. " But when the criminals and leaders are white men, race and gender become the elephant in the room. Nearly all the mass shootings in this country in recent years have been committed by white men and boys. Unlike other groups, white men are not used to being singled out. So we expect that many of them will protest that it is unfair if we talk about them.
NEWS
November 19, 2012 | Charles A. Gallagher, For the Inquirer
Charles A. Gallagher is chair of the department of sociology and criminal justice at La Salle University Whites are back in the news. They never really left, but the way whites as a demographic group are currently being discussed in the media has shifted from marketing niches or political collectives (soccer mom, Joe Sixpack, suburban voters) to a population that is now in an accelerating death spiral. Fox News' Bill O'Reilly recently explained how the rug had been pulled out from older white men like himself, as the nation becomes strikingly less white and more racially diverse.
NEWS
October 4, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Prostate cancer is especially tough on African Americans. They are about 50 percent more likely than white men to get the disease and twice as likely to die of it. The Prostate Cancer Foundation wants to help research institutions in Philadelphia take the lead in figuring out why, the foundation's founder and co-chair, Michael Milken, said Tuesday evening during the group's 10th annual fund-raiser in Philadelphia. Milken said he wonders, "What can we learn from this that would not only help them but will help all men on the planet?"
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
CHARLOTTE - For women, there was health care, abortion rights, and access to contraceptives. For gays, a celebration of the growing acceptance of same-sex marriage. Latinos got the keynoter, San Antonio Mayor Julián Castro, and President Obama's decision not to deport children of undocumented immigrants. The Democratic National Convention seemed to offer a little something for every important demographic group in the party's coalition. On Wednesday night, though, it reached out to Bubba.
NEWS
September 7, 2012
DEAR Mr. President: I'm not sure you'll get this. Rahm Emmanuel told us on Tuesday that you had quite a collection of mail from other Americans and that you made him read and digest the letters because they spoke of values you "fought for every day. " So, while I know you're busy just now, I'm writing on the off chance you've got a few free moments. Given the number of people who've fronted for you at the convention, I'm hoping you've had time to put up your feet. Speaking of those people, they were an interesting bunch.
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