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FOOD
January 24, 2013
Mike Giammarino, whose Lombardi's Pizza on 18th Street was displaced in 2005 for the construction of the 10 Rittenhouse condos, found a corner spot in South Philly for his month-old revival, Gennaro's Tomato Pie. Giammarino - whose Lombardi's in New York is acknowledged as the oldest pizzeria in the United States - puts out old-school, well-done New York-style pizza. The signature white pizza has a sturdy yet lightweight crust that holds generous portions of fresh mozzarella and ricotta salata, bubbling and brown.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1986 | By MADELINE DAVIS, Daily News Finds Columnist
The Great Pizza Debate - thin crust vs. thick crust, white pizza vs. red, extra cheese vs. plain - is never ending. Into the fray steps a new pizza shop in Olde City that is offering gourmet pizza that is not only scrumptious, it's healthy, too. Chip Off the Old Block, at the corner of Third and Race, serves three kinds of pizza: Regular, with chunks of tomato; Veggie, with mushrooms, onions, green peppers and tomatoes; and Chips, vegetables, pepperoni...
NEWS
June 11, 1987 | By SAM GUGINO, Daily News Restaurant Critic
GRIFE'S, 5 South 2nd St. (925-0590) 1/2 (5/29/87) $$$ Perhaps the recent arrival of a liquor license will increase business and help sharpen the skills of the kitchen and dining room staff. Recommended dishes: cabbage soup ($1.75), white pizza ($3.95), New York strip steak with bourbon-sauteed onions ($13.95), and carrot cake ($2.75). MARSHALTON INN, Route 162, West Chester (691-4367); 1/2 (6/15/87) $$$$ This no-frills, authentic-looking inn takes dining by candelight seriously.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1987 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Louie Linguini, an Italian offspring of Rib-It, has made his debut. The opening took place last week at 104 Chestnut St., and Louie is already demonstrating that he can offer "real" food at fast-food prices. Louie's surrogate father is Paul Rimmier, the originator of the Rib-It restaurants. Rimmier is something like the old-time medicine man, but even better. He gives you all the fun, trappings and humorous hype, but unlike the medicine man, he also gives you the remedy. At Louie Linguini - just as at Rib-It - the remedy is a cure for the high cost of dining out. Lunchtime specials are as low as $2.95 for lasagna.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1987 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
The kids munched strombolis and Haagen-Dazs bars. Their parents filled out order sheets. And exhibitors in the balloon-filled room enjoyed the chance to bring their new products to the attention of Super Fresh store managers and other staff members. The occasion was Super Fresh's second annual Spring and Summer Sale, an event for chain employees that resembled a cross between a company picnic and a trade show, spread out in an exhibition hall of the Woodbine Inn in Pennsauken, N.J. Amid balloons and hamsters that raced each hour - courtesy of Hartz Mountain - there was serious business going on. "The vendors take orders here.
FOOD
September 16, 2010
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat:        Reader: I checked out Capasso's West Side Gravy and the place was deserted except for the lonely greeter. What's going on with that restaurant? C.L.: West Side Gravy was deserted the last time I passed by - on a Friday night - which isn't a good sign. Alex Capasso is an excellent chef, and I've yet to try his comfort food updates here. They may be outstanding. But there's something a bit cavernous and stark about this converted Woolworth's space that seems to be uninviting.
NEWS
July 16, 1987 | By MARIANNE COSTANTINOU, Daily News Nightlife Writer
The road beneath I-95 is bumpy with potholes and railroad tracks. At night, the warehouses are empty, the parking lots deserted. Shirtless men sit atop metal garbage cans. Past the Aramingo exit, straight on Richmond Street, left on Somerset. Now the brick row houses of Port Richmond, with the porcelain Madonnas in the windows. And finally, the reason for the pilgrimage: a modest storefront with a neon sign. THIS IS TACCONELLI'S PIZZERIA Tacconelli's. Anyone who's been in Philly for more than a few hours has heard of the family-run restaurant with the garlic-smothered, no-tomato-sauce "white pizza.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1987 | By Shelley Hall, Special to The Inquirer
Americans now prefer it to the hamburger. Government and industry calculations are that it is an $11 billion industry in the United States. And because it is available in such variety, meat eaters and vegetarians can enjoy it at the same table. It, of course, is pizza. By now, there probably isn't a burg in the United States that doesn't have at least one pizza parlor. In the cities, there are enough pizzerias to confound. And there are as many varieties of pizza as there are types of people who eat it. But where there is profusion, there is variation in quality.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1997 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
To Frank Borda, music, like food, is something you need to keep alive. He remembers being a little kid and wanting to be an opera star someday. But then, almost suddenly, he was 36 years old - and no stardom. What he did have was 10 years of music studies under his belt. He sang and had a huge collection of opera records and Mario Lanza memorabilia - plus a pizza business in South Philadelphia. The business was really going great. So great that it was becoming a bit of a problem.
FOOD
October 26, 1994 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Food Editor
With the recent opening of Cafe Giuseppe in Roxborough, it's now possible to go downtown by heading northwest. Downtown as in South Philadelphia, that is. Cafe Giuseppe's menu, friendliness, big portions, modest prices and casual atmosphere will put you in mind of downtown. The restaurant's young owners grew up there, and its chef has worked his way through the kitchens of Felicia's and Frankie's Seafood Italiano, among others. A commendable eagerness to please helps smooth over the new-restaurant rough spots - such as the empty tray dropped on a customer sitting behind us, and the need to ask for refills of water and bread.
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NEWS
June 19, 2014
J ASON AND MARLO Dilks, of Queen Village, are husband-and-wife owners of Slice, which makes "Trenton-style" pizza in Center City, South Philly and Washington Township, N.J. The first location, at 10th and Federal streets, opened in 2007. Marlo, 32, runs the business side, designs menus and shops for fresh ingredients. Jason, 38, spends nights in Slice's locations overseeing customer service and quality control. I spoke with Marlo. Q: What led to Slice? A: My father was a butcher at 24th and Passyunk and then he opened a deli in Folcroft and another in South Philadelphia.
FOOD
January 24, 2013
Mike Giammarino, whose Lombardi's Pizza on 18th Street was displaced in 2005 for the construction of the 10 Rittenhouse condos, found a corner spot in South Philly for his month-old revival, Gennaro's Tomato Pie. Giammarino - whose Lombardi's in New York is acknowledged as the oldest pizzeria in the United States - puts out old-school, well-done New York-style pizza. The signature white pizza has a sturdy yet lightweight crust that holds generous portions of fresh mozzarella and ricotta salata, bubbling and brown.
FOOD
September 16, 2010
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat:        Reader: I checked out Capasso's West Side Gravy and the place was deserted except for the lonely greeter. What's going on with that restaurant? C.L.: West Side Gravy was deserted the last time I passed by - on a Friday night - which isn't a good sign. Alex Capasso is an excellent chef, and I've yet to try his comfort food updates here. They may be outstanding. But there's something a bit cavernous and stark about this converted Woolworth's space that seems to be uninviting.
NEWS
October 14, 2001 | By Sara Isadora Mancuso INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When he was a mariner in the Italian Navy, John Scotto learned to cook. In 1967, Scotto, who now lives in Cherry Hill, began transforming his mess-hall meals into Italian fast food, which is served in six of his family's restaurants throughout South Jersey and Philadelphia. Although there has been a steady stream of customers for 30 years, the Scottos faced opening their new Cherry Hill business, Scotto Pizza, on Sept. 24, only 13 days after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. "We thought, since everything is ready," said John Scotto Jr., a manager and cook, "Why not open?"
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1997 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
To Frank Borda, music, like food, is something you need to keep alive. He remembers being a little kid and wanting to be an opera star someday. But then, almost suddenly, he was 36 years old - and no stardom. What he did have was 10 years of music studies under his belt. He sang and had a huge collection of opera records and Mario Lanza memorabilia - plus a pizza business in South Philadelphia. The business was really going great. So great that it was becoming a bit of a problem.
FOOD
October 26, 1994 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Food Editor
With the recent opening of Cafe Giuseppe in Roxborough, it's now possible to go downtown by heading northwest. Downtown as in South Philadelphia, that is. Cafe Giuseppe's menu, friendliness, big portions, modest prices and casual atmosphere will put you in mind of downtown. The restaurant's young owners grew up there, and its chef has worked his way through the kitchens of Felicia's and Frankie's Seafood Italiano, among others. A commendable eagerness to please helps smooth over the new-restaurant rough spots - such as the empty tray dropped on a customer sitting behind us, and the need to ask for refills of water and bread.
FOOD
April 13, 1994 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Food Editor
The first night we visited Ristorante Gravina in Northeast Philadelphia, we were seated next to a family with five children. Everyone, kids included, was speaking Italian. A good sign. Even before we stepped inside the glass front door, Ristorante Gravina projected warmth. The restaurant's wood-burning oven is the first thing arriving customers see; a hint of garlic in the air offers a second greeting for the senses. The courteous welcome and attentive service that followed came as no surprise.
NEWS
July 3, 1992 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
New flower boxes were being eased into place the first night I visited Chattanooga's in Wayne. By the next night, they were already filled with blooms. The flower boxes are just one indicator of the changes afoot at 523 W. Lancaster Ave., known as Conestoga Crossing in a previous life. Inside, the menu has been facelifted by chef-owner, David C. Wentz, formerly executive chef at La Fourchette. La Fourchette isn't being cloned here. Wentz looked at his closest competitors on Lancaster Avenue (Taquet, Ristorante Primavera and L'Auberge)
NEWS
May 29, 1992 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
When was the last time you had a truly memorable dessert in an Italian restaurant? If it's been a while, look in on Solo Mio in Old City, which prides itself on its homemade ricotta cheesecakes and a ricotta-pasta pie. Solo Mio is the kind of place many restaurants try to be: friendly, budget- priced and so spotless that you'll notice. First-time customers are treated like regulars. The staff is well-informed about the menu. The pizzas, pasta dishes and desserts are made with skill and pride.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1991 | By the Mystery Muncher, Blue Plate Special to The Inquirer
Eat with your head, not over it. - The Muncher's Credo The Muncher's job looks simple: Every week, write up two places where the food is good, the tables are clean, and the prices are very low. There's a lot of searching and eating, searching and eating, to find two winners each week. Life becomes a blur: Pepperonispumonibolognacannolicalzonelomeinchowmeinhoagiehotdoggiecornedbeefonry eturkeyandafrenchfr. Pass the bicarb. Ah, but there is a joy to munching - no doubt about it. The sensation of soft rye with a hard crust, encasing a pile of slightly warm corned beef, coleslaw and Russian dressing.
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